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Opinion

  • The issue of guaranteeing religious freedom emerged this month in a bill that sailed through the General Assembly and was vetoed last week by Gov. Steve Beshear.

    We certainly are proponents of religious freedom and supporters of those rights as enumerated in the U.S. and state constitutions, but to us this seems sort of like the below-the-radar constitutional amendment on hunting that the voters swallowed last November:

    Why are our elected leaders spending time on something esoteric and unnecessary?

  • Among the many lessons of loyalty parents are required to sear into the souls of their children, right up there with God, country, family, the flag and, oh, apple pie, is what would appear to be the loftiest love of all: loyalty to your team. These are lessons that include recognizing primary colors, memorizing pithy songs, grasping base humor and understanding unfettered usages for gerunds and participles.

  • As the process moves forward toward creating countywide curbside garbage and recycling for residents, we want to be sure that all those responsible for making these decisions are reading from the same and appropriate page.

    Certainly, we are encouraged and buoyed to learn that the members of Shelby County Fiscal Court and the Shelbyville City Council are being proactive and working together on this issue. A joint effort on a contract only could help both bodies effectively represent their constituents by providing the best possible rate.

  • As almost everyone around here will tell him – and by his own admission, he appears to understand – Shawn Pickens has a big job ahead of him.

    In taking over as the new director of Shelby County Parks & Recreation, Mr. Pickens not only inherits a complicated and growing task of managing resources and manpower to meet an ever-growing need and opportunity, but he also steps into the boots and sneakers of a man who spent has spent his life building that system, Clay Cottongim.

  • Today to you is the first day of spring, arriving on the calendar if not exactly aligned with the forecast this week of lows perhaps near the teens. Just when the daffodils start to feel welcome, they get smacked with snow, ice and more petal-numbing temperatures. Maybe this is the confernal equinox.

    But I’m not here to talk about the weather, no matter how easily that topic has been known to consume dead air, recourse dragging dinner conversations and fill the blank pages of uninspired typists. But those aren’t me.

  • Two men died recently who were a credit to their families, their community and their country.

    I recall a defining moment about each man, one of which I witnessed and the other that was related to me.

    Roy Lyons was an easy man to know. He loved to play golf, visit with friends at the local coffee cup and attend the Upper Room Bible class. He also taught Sunday school at one time. But what I remember most about him was his service to this nation as a highly decorated U. S. Marine.

  • It is time Shelby Countians unite behind a common cause. Let our voices ring as one on this singular issue of great importance. We are often divided by our national and state politics. We are even on opposite sides on many local issues.

    But we cannot let our differences and even apathy hold us back anymore. We must rally behind this common goal: Save our Post Offices!

    Why? Because it’s important. This is not an abstract debate. We’re not talking about obscure data with minute percentage tweaks that really don’t affect anyone at any level.

  • Members of Young Leaders Institute experienced Education Day last month, when they visited Collins High School, Simpsonville Elementary, and Cornerstone Christian Academy.

    At Collins they heard testimonies from students about how they are ready for the future because they have met or are on track to meet their BIG Goals. Josh Rice made it clear that “very unique opportunities in Shelby County Public Schools have helped me become college and career ready.” He named Student Technology Leadership Program, Technology Student Association and Project Lead The Way.

  • At about 5:45 last Wednesday morning, I saw a photograph of the flames.

    They were bright and beautiful in their red, orange and gold deadliness, these flames. They were growing and scary and mesmerizing.

    Joseph Vance, guitarist extraordinaire and downtown resident, awakened by the fearsome smell of smoke, went into the cold March morning and saw downtown Shelbyville on fire.

  • We have sympathy for the residents of the Hunter’s Pointe development just south of Simpsonville.

    First, two companies come along and say they’re going to build mega-sized outlet malls nearby – one of them in some of their backyards – and now the approval of those projects have been followed by the East Kentucky Power Coopeerative, which may build a substation and/or power towers for lines in or near those same homes.

  • Even the most optimistic among us is fretting now about what will happen to the fire-gashed hole on the southwest side of Main Street in Shelbyville’s business district.

    Public officials were as distraught as residents of the four-block incineration were relieved Wednesday morning, following the horrible blaze that erupted. And both groups had real validation for those feelings.

    Four men escaped the blaze, thanks to good work by landlords and aggressive police officer Kelly Malone, who deserves our praise as well.

  • Perhaps you’ve heard the old joke about the woman who received a call from her bank informing her that she had overdrawn her account. “That’s impossible,” responded the obviously offended woman. “I can’t be overdrawn – I still have checks!”

  • I have sat around long enough without making a public statement about this issue. If you don't believe that it is actually happening by now, then the reason you won't accept it is one or all of the following:

    1.    You have some monetary gain, through maybe your stock, or a similar situation, so you just continue to say that it is all a bunch of hogwash.

  • The higher math being taught at our schools these days isn’t in the classrooms of honors and Advance Placement courses but, rather, in the public gatherings of the Shelby County Board of Education.

  • In the nearly 221 years that Shelby County has been recording official history, there are two words of excellence that we can’t find in the index: Academy Award.

    For all the wonderful artists, actors and thespians who have trod the boards in Shelby County and gone on to bigger and better things, none has appeared on of those brief but incredibly esteemed lists of actors who have gone home with the gold statuette they call Oscar.

    But now maybe we can add those words to our lore, even if we have to put an * beside it.

  • As a child I sometimes heard adults talk about a place called the “poor house.”

    I didn’t know what it was or where it was, although I envisioned it somewhere near Waddy, which seemed like a place across the universe to a kid who grew up near Simpsonville.

    The poor house was amorphous, but it was also scary. It sounded dark and forbidding and where kids wouldn’t be welcome.

  • We are seeing encouraging signals that Shelby County Fiscal Court and the Shelbyville City Council are on the verge of accomplishing something magnificent and wonderful, even if it is at least a decade overdue:

    Officials of the county and city appear moving toward establishing curbside pickup of garbage and recycling for all residents.

    We don’t mean to be presumptuous, because no ordinance has been drafted or presented. A misstep or politics or fear could emerge, and the public again could be left holding its own trash bags.

  • Dr. Benjamin Rush was the chief medical counsel to Thomas Jefferson and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Dr. Rush is also famous for advocating a medical treatment that proved to be incredibly disastrous. He advocated bleeding the patient as a cure for a wide range of illnesses.

  • I do not like to publicly attack others on their letters to the editor, but since Eugene Maynard has made a career of doing just that, a past letter of mine included, I feel I am justified to “do to him what he has done to me.” Maynard’s rant (“The Presidential gun-grab,” My Word, Jan. 30) is nothing more than a rant.

    In doing a little research on the Internet, I found Sen. Rand Paul’s untruthful scare letter sent to supporters in which the senator and Eugene Maynard give out the same misinformation.

  • We aren’t certain just yet if we want to embrace the downhill snowball that the legalization of industrial hemp has become, but all this discussion and rapid movement by our elected leaders certainly have our undivided attention.

    That state Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) was able to push his bill to accommodate hemp through the state Senate in just a couple of weeks of the session is remarkable. That he had an all-star lineup of Republican endorsements is impressive.