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Opinion

  • Duanne Puckett may have retired last week from her role in publicizing Shelby County Public Schools – sort of her second retirement after leaving the leadership position of this newspaper in 1998 – but she won’t be retiring from the role of a lifetime.

    That’s because Ms. Puckett, for all her accomplishments – she is a member of the University of Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame, among dozens of other stellar achievements – is a role model.

  • I have been publicly attacked by Rudy M. Wiesemann, whose paycheck has always been provided by the chemical industry, just in case you haven't already figured that out (My Word, “No need to save the planet,” May 1).

  • We have a new hero, and he’s only a junior at Collins High School. His legend wasn’t built on a playing field or stage, like so many of his classmates, but he certainly is a star in our minds.

    That’s because we think he sets a refreshing example of how adults in positions of authority should handle themselves in moments of public scrutiny.

  • Another WHAS Crusade for Children has come and gone – 60 of them now – and the generosity of Shelby Countians contributed significantly to the more than $6 million collected this year.

    Most of that comes, of course, from fire departments around the county who open their arms and set their clocks by the collection schedule for this annual telethon to help disabled and underserved children.

  • “Life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it, without knowing what's going to happen next.”Gilda Radner

    The tornado that struck Moore, Okla., -- and those that followed in other nearby towns – remind us again that life is uncertain. I find it nearly impossible to comprehend the pain and loss those people are enduring today, especially the parents of the lost children.

  • Dozens of Shelbyville residents crowded our city hall last November calling on Mayor Tom Hardesty and the city council to consider passage of a simple, anti-discrimination fairness ordinance. The proposed law would prohibit discrimination in employment, housing or public accommodations based upon a person's actual or perceived race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age (over 40), disability, familial status, sexual orientation or gender identity.

  • Little boys and girls grow up imagining the big moment in their dream lives. For some that means hitting the game-winning home run, making the half-court shot as the buzzer sounds, playing solo in Carnegie Hall, recording a hit single or even delivering a moving speech in the halls of government.

    They stand in back yards, on playgrounds, on a balcony above a hallway, in front of the mirrors in their bedrooms. Some may hold hair brushes for microphones, hit rocks with a chipped bat or bank in a shot on a wooden backboard attached to a barn.

  • Mine was a Memorial weekend to remember, but not for the altruistic and patriotic reasons – although any father of a Marine, which I am, holds service and sacrifice with immeasurable respect – but because we made a lot of memories around our place.

    During my youth, Memorial Day was the holiday when we would visit the gravesite of my maternal grandfather, whom I can’t remember from my infancy but whose medals from World War I have been for decades part of the decor in my mother’s bedroom.

  • Sometimes mathematical problems can be a bit complex, and we have observed that the members of the Shelby County School Board have found a few equations they can’t quite solve. Certainly, there are several variables in each, but there’s an operation or algorithm that apparently is quite difficult to decipher.

  • We read the reports, and you likely are as amazed as are we. Shelby County’s high school students have earned millions of dollars of scholarships and awards that not only underscore their hard work and academic excellence but also reinforce the careers that some seem entrenched to pursue.

  • If Rudy Wiesemann was vying for the irony award with his My Word ("No need to save the planet,” May 1), he should win it hands down. Because after grandly stating that he could not let "unreferenced misstatements go unrefuted," and that he "prefer[s] to rely on facts to expose errors, myths, [and] mistakes," he then proceeds to lay out paragraph after paragraph of unreferenced misstatements, logical errors, easily debunked myths and outright mistakes.

  • Give me a “S.” Give me a “C.” Hip, Hip, Hooray, Shelby County!

    We’ve learned that Shelby County’s most exuberant, tireless and faithful cheerleader has announced her retirement. Shelby County’s strongest advocate, Duanne Puckett, is retiring this month from her role as Public Relations Coordinator for Shelby County Public Schools.  Leaving the role of the face and often the handshake of Shelby County’s education system marks the close of just one chapter in Duanne’s lifetime of service to this community.

  • We understand that expansion of the Medicaid plan as part of the Affordable Care Act is seen as a political football, a topic to be kicked back and forth across a field of ideology with not a whole lot of regard for the players involved.

    We also admit that we don’t have the sufficient grasp of either the process or economics to reinforce the decision last week by Gov. Steve Beshear to expand the rolls and open up the possibility that perhaps 300,000 more Kentuckians can have access to health insurance.

  • We were pleased to see that the Shelby County Board of Education will hear this week a formal proposal to provide teachers a pay raise in the coming fiscal year.

    Teachers are under fire continually – as is our educational system in general, it would seem – and many of them are taking those bullets for barely enough money to make a decent living.

  • I was heartened to hear members of the Shelbyville City Council may make adult-provided or adult-present minors' use of illegal substances a city as well as a county and state penalty (“Adult hosts of teen parties may be fined,” May 20). This I hope you will pass.

    However, I encourage you to change the minimum fine to $1000 for the first offense, with multiples of that for later offenses. Here is why.

  • When I visited the Education Center @ Cropper on May 2, I chatted with a junior, Jose Menendez, about the online algebra course he was taking. He switched gears and reminded me that we first met when he was a student at Painted Stone Elementary. He vividly remembered the history lesson I shared about the Painted Stone settlement and even the rock painted red that I brought with me.

    “You’re ‘Miss Bug,’ right?” he asked.

    He was right.

  • Tell the truth: If you are a parent, you thought twice about sending your child to school on Tuesday morning.

    You looked at the satellite images of the approaching weather system that had laid waste to miles and miles of homes in Oklahoma. You looked at the darkening skies in the west. You thought about families whose children were huddled in a school not built to withstand the right cross from nature’s most fearsome force.

  • A steamy Sunday afternoon in early August, 1963. Crosley Field, the old baseball park in Cincinnati, and the Pirates are in town to play the Reds in that long lost treasure called the “Sunday doubleheader.”

  • We were dismayed last week when there was a meeting of Shelby County Fiscal Court that did not include mention of the decision by the group’s Legislative Committee to step away from the prospect of creating curbside garbage and recycling pickup for residents.

    Surely the magistrates realize that, based on new legislation passed this spring in the General Assembly, they will become responsible for signing off on the budget of the county’s 109 Board, the entity that is responsible for garbage and recycling in the county.