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Opinion

  • Let’s begin with a cliche: Age is simply a number. Or another: You’re only as old as you feel.

    Or, as Mitch Albom suggested in his quirky The Time Keeper: If we didn’t measure time, would we know that it was passing?

    Those are thoughts at the top of my quickly crowding cranium because I recently had one of those landmark birthdays that give us pause and has us studying the mirror and dreading the horizon – and chanting it’s only a number, it’s only a number.

  • About three months have passed since the body of teenager Jackleen Lane was found in a remote, private area of Clear Creek in Shelbyville, and we continue to get the impression that many would wish that our questions about how she came to be there would be buried along with her remains.

  • Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer said last week that he expects farmers in the state to be producing industrial hemp by next spring.

    My, has that economic engine turned quickly and driven this machine, which would provide a new, indigenous cash crop for our state, to market with very little delay.

  • If a picture is worth a thousand words, video evidence must warrant a book. It's a book the Obama administration recommended to members of Congress and the American people last week as the president and those in his circle made the plea for military strikes against the Syrian government in the wake of gas attacks they allegedly carried out on citizens of that country.

  • For the record, the Shelbyville-Shelby County Parks Board did all they could to make the women's gym a reality and keep it up and going. It bothers me that people do not ever give at least a little credit when credit is due.

    For those that do not know the whole story of Curves and the FAC Women's Gym, this is what really took place. I as parks director, in 2012, was approached by an individual and told that the owner of Curves was planning to close it in December. The individual asked if we would take it over and move the equipment to the FAC.

  • The Affordable Care Act – love it, hate it or don’t know much about it – will become part of our world and our lives next month.

    The adoption of national health-care reform, an effort to provide medical insurance to Americans who can’t afford it or don’t have access to it and to ensure that coverage is not denied to others because of age or pre-existing conditions, is not embraced by everyone, we understand.

  • Every year when the calendar strikes Sept. 11, the memories of that awful day 12 years ago come blasting back to the forefront of our consciousness.

    There is nothing that can change the images of airplanes flying into skyscrapers and the Pentagon or the understanding that evil forces wanted to destroy Americans and upset our way of life. It was indescribably horrible and unfathomably confounding. Why would citizens of another country want to sacrifice their lives to create terror and panic?

  • Wow, have you looked through the hundreds upon hundreds of winners from Shelby County who brought home ribbons from the Kentucky State Fair?

    A list culled from those posted by fair organizers is so voluminous that it takes several editions and pages of the newspapers just to provide the basic info. That process continues this week and into next as the names roll and roll.

    Grand champions, sweepstakes winners, reserve champions and enough ribbons to cover all the walls of a large room were handed out.

  • We are trusting that the maddeningly long and purposefully political process of realigning our state’s legislative and judicial districts truly is complete. Our leaders say it is. But they said so in 2011, as well, when they were supposed to have this done in the first place.

  • Wen we learned last week that Shelby County Public Schools Superintendent James Neihof planned to ask the school board to approve a .5 of a cent compensating rate on tax increases, our first reaction was that this was an astounding accomplishment in this day of expanding educational needs and contracting resources.

  • When I was a little boy, my favorite book was The Giving Tree, by Shel Silverstein. Perhaps like most children, I was always saddened by the slow disappearance of the tree into the insatiable worldly desires of the young boy. The apples and branches and trunk all find their way into the black hole of the boy’s ambition.

    “I want money, a house, a boat.” Take from my body, the tree says. I am told that the story is a parable for the selfless giving of a parent, a friend, a Christ, a God who is willing to sacrifice in the name of love and affection.

  • Having spent, like many boys and girls in Shelby County’s history, my formative years in keen observation of cows, I am continually amazed by the devotion families have to them, how delicately they treat them and care for them. Sometimes I have to wonder if some among us of have converted to Hindu, so revered are their bovine gods and goddesses. At least cows aren’t allowed to roam the streets anywhere this side of New Delhi.

  • Despite The Sentinel News’ reporting that the Shelby County Judicial Center employees have fallen out of grace with the Centenary United Methodist Church next door (Church: No more park,” June 28), we believed the relationship was a good one. We were very grateful and appreciative of the church’s generosity in offering convenient and safe reserved parking spots for full-time state employees. No such thought was given by the powers that be who supervised the planning of the new judicial center.  

  • The brouhaha that came to light last week about a pageant contestant from Shelby County who was disqualified from competing for the state Little Miss title because she was too old is a sad moment for an innocent little girl. We feel sorry for her and wish that she not have experienced that disappointment. It’s a sad moment from society when a clerical error by an adult – although no one will take responsibility for that mistake – can take away a child’s beautiful smile.

  • We were pleased to read that Citizens Union Bank has emerged from the oversight of state banking examiners and has steadied its course for the future.

    CUB this year is marking 125 years as part of Shelby County, and we certainly think this good news adds candles to that celebratory cake.

    The volatile real estate market of a few years ago and the aggressive investment in Shelby County by a hometown bank came together to create some dicey days for CUB. We, too, were saddened that bank examination became part of the process of sorting out those problems.

  • I wish to throw my support firmly behind Chuck Souder’s article (“The Founders’ Declaration of ‘In-Dependence,’” June 28),pertaining to the American Founders’ “dependence upon God” and the idea they taught Americans should be “grateful and accountable to God.” Sometimes, atheists like to selectively quote the Founders, as if the Founders were atheists, which they were not. Souder has the strength of history on his side.

    Washington: Farewell Address to the American People,1796:

  • Ten years after I graduated from college, I felt like I had a dual life. On one hand, I was a husband and new father. On the other hand, I was a salesman with a $14 million, 5-state territory.

    The two parts of my life battled each other. I performed the job from my car and was the classic "road warrior." It was not uncommon for me to leave on a Monday morning and spend the majority of the week calling the other portion of my life from a hotel telephone.

  • As one who attended the Shelbyville City Council’s public hearing on curbside trash and recycling, it was disheartening to see the turnout and hear the spin put on the subject. In my opinion the spin was at best misleading and worst self-serving (“Curbside trash, recycling talk draws small crowd,” July 31).

  • A communications gap last week among employees of Norfolk Southern Railroad that frustrated residents and officials in Shelby County was testament to a much larger problem than some blocked crossings that railroaded commuters on the first day of the school year.