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Opinion

  • Memo to Commonwealth Attorney Laura Donnell: Open the grand jury testimony in the shooting death of Trey Williams.

    The family of Mr. Williams, the teenager who died tragically in a confrontation with Shelbyville Police Officers in November 2011, is seeking the records as part of the fact-finding in their lawsuit against the police department and specifically against Suzanna Marcum, the officer who fired those three fatal shots.

  • We were glad to hear last week of the plans of real estate broker Lee Webb and his church, Christ Community Church, in the purchase of Governors Square. This can be nothing but good news for Shelbyville.

    Although this parcel technically is outside the city’s limits this is a welcome step in developing the city’s long-range plans for a spiffy and inviting East End.

  • If you don’t believe that the Lord works in mysterious ways – or even that the Lord is the lord – then I offer this testimony:

    This morning at my house an air conditioner surgeon is scheduled to make his or her fourth trip to triage our injured unit. That happens. We all have experienced problems with our units.

    But our H/VAC has been on some level of hiatus since, oh, July 15.

    That’s three weeks in the middle of summer with little or no cool air circulating.

  • Good job by the Shelbyville City Council last week when it conducted an open meeting to review its plans to adopt a citywide curbside and recycling program.

    That was the penultimate appropriate step, to answer questions from and disseminate information to the public about those plans. Next would be the ultimate decision: to pass an ordinance enacting the collection of trash and recyclables from all residences.

  • There used to be a time, before Daylight Savings Time pushed our summer sunsets until almost bedtime, before schools started with the dog days of August and before lights from the mixing center contaminated our horizons, when I was lured all over the county by a phenomenon in the heavens.

  • Back-to-school time is when parents are frenzied with making sure their students’ clothes for the coming year are the correct size and shape, that the appropriate number and color of folders/notebooks/journals have been acquired and labeled and that pencils – and students – are sharpened and prepared for those first classes next Wednesday.

  • The little girl with pigtails and big black eyes rushes onto the stage, smiling and even giggling. She pauses at the right moment, confronts the spotlight and sings in duet a short, sweet song in French, ignoring an audience overflowing assigned seats and every other element of her first stage performance except her role.

    She is 6 years old. She is fearless. She is calm. She amazes.

    How can one so young respond with such aplomb in such a fearsome situation?

  • Hard work won't kill you, for I did my share of that. Born on July 24, 1911. as the only girl in the family of Thomas D. and Minnie K Lewis, I had three older brothers to put up with. This meant I had to clean up after them, help cook their meals and wash their dishes.

  • We were dismayed last week to hear about Yum! Brands new strategic move with Kentucky Fried Chicken – or KFC, if you prefer.

    In case you missed the announcement, Yum! is planning to test a “fast casual” restaurant aimed at a younger audience as a possible spinoff chain, with healthier chicken recipes (even no bones) and side dishes, which we applaud, but with one key item missing from its menu:

    Colonel Harland Sanders himself.

  • One of the summer’s big events, the Shelbyville Horse Show, is only a week away, but the fun news is that our community’s celebration of that event gets off to a broader start with the Shelbyville Horse Show Jubilee, which arrives this week for its 3-day run.

    We love the horse show and its magical way of putting a fine dressing on the Saddlebred competitors in Shelby County, but we love the Jubilee for putting a nice bow on the populace at large and making this event relevant to everyone.

  • The volatile issue of pay for substitute teachers in Shelby County – which has become as big a debate for its emotion as it has for its fiscal prudence – appears to be nearing a reasonable conclusion.

    We don’t expect that all sides are perfectly happy with the decision last week by the Shelby County School Board, but we believe the due diligence of the process is encouraging and fulfills a moral obligation to all parties involved: the most experienced substitute teachers and we taxpayers who fund their checks.

  • What a wonderful sight to behold: Heavy equipment tearing down the decrepit and unsightly Wesley Apartments brick by ugly brick.

    You may recall that we had called for the immediate removal of these abandoned and dangerous eyesores at the corner of KY 55 and U.S. 60 even as a new CVS store was being constructed next door.

  • There are many metaphors to describe the idea that something big is coming. Sleeping dogs. Sleeping giants. Runaway trains. Quiet volcanoes. Rechargeable batteries….wait, what?

    Well, admittedly rechargeable batteries don’t have the poetic value of the others, but the idea remains. Rechargeable batteries are energy accumulators. When recharging, they are gearing up for the work they must perform in the future. When recharging, they are preparing for the moment when they can transfer their stored energy. When recharging, they are building and growing.

  • I have been following with great interest how the United States government has approached three great embarrassments: Julian Assange, Bradley Manning, and Edward Snowden. No one disputes that what those men revealed was true. Yet Americans are divided (in what percentages, I do not know) as to whether these are traitors or heroes.

  • We’re glad that there will be a race in 2014 for Kentucky’s seat in the United States Senate.

    We were fearing that the perceived walkover that incumbent Republican Mitch McConnell is approaching was about to become a reality, that Sen. McConnell would get 6 more years by default.

    But now that the actor and the Miss America have withdrawn from consideration, Alison Lundergan Grimes, our secretary of state, has stepped forward to carry the banner for the Democrats.

  • There has been a lot of activity surrounding the much-needed new interchange for KY 55 at Interstate 64, and we’re not talking about the ongoing and constant bustle of construction.

    This interchange – whose status was pushed forward for immediate repair because its decades-old design had left an unacceptably short and imminently dangerous merge/acceleration lane eastbound – continues to be a tempest of debate and demands for help, despite the fact that construction is not even halfway completed.

  • This was supposed to be about my July 4th and a unique opportunity to watch celebratory bombs bursting in air over the harbor area of an American city far older than the Declaration of Independence, which would be Beaufort, S.C., founded circa 1711.

    But given the deluge I left with those of you at home, given all the efforts to produce and ignite fireworks that had to be shelved day after day and finally for more than a week or two, understanding the holiday cabin fever that beset you, that would have seemed a bit self-serving.

  • Shelbyville City Council member Mike Zoeller made a really good point during a recent council meeting, a point we would encourage him to make again – only louder.

    When discussing the federal Fair Housing Law that the city council was about to sign so that it could move forward with its plans to acquire a grant so that the historic Blue Gables property on Main Street could be purchased and restored, Mr. Zoeller asked this:

  • We have to commend the East Kentucky Power Cooperative for its good judgment.

    The company announced last week that it was in negotiations to acquire property north of Interstate 64 to construct its new substation at Simpsonville, a facility required because of expected demand for the Outlet Shoppes of Louisville.

    The placement of that substation, which will link high-voltage lines from a substation near KY 55 in Shelbyville, had been the point of much consternation for officials and residents.