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Opinion

  • Smiling students – or at least half awake students – boarded buses and piled out of cars this morning for the first day of school after a long and restful summer break.

    And while it may seem very early to be back in school, we must remember that they’ve been out since well before June 1, and there are three two-week breaks coming this school year – one in October, another in December and again in April.

  • Our community is fortunate. We have a public school system filled with incredibly engaged students in grades pre-K through 12 and a team of professional teachers and administrators who strive daily to provide an excellent education to benefit this community for generations to come.

    A vital component of the progress of our district – and thus our community – is the leadership provided by the men and women who make up the Shelby County Board of Education.

  • Members of the 5 Counties Friends of NRA recently attended the annual Kentucky Friends of NRA Workshop, and Fund Committee Meeting. Chair Tony Wheatley and Treasurer Larry Mott represented the local Friends of NRA committee.

    At the workshop, the state Friends of NRA recognized many committees for their huge success in 2016. First, they were awarded the Friends of NRA’s “Kentucky Breakout Award” which recognizes those committees that have broken out of their usual efforts by reaching an extraordinary result.

  • Losing our human rights

    The recent railroading of our now infamous Governor Matt Bevin and Kentucky’s Congress on Saturday, Jan. 7, pushing seven highly controversial pieces of legislature down our throats, has left me and thousands of others furious.

  • The Shelbyville City Council decided last week to draft an ordinance for review on making the council race a non-partisan affair.

    Having long wondered what Republican and Democrats have to do with our small town politics, we could not be more pleased and more behind this effort.

    And once information was shared comparing other municipalities, especially those similar to Shelbyville, it seems the move is a no-brainer.

  • Back from the grave.

    That’s what I thought when Dr. Michael Kommor of Baptist Health spoke the two words “divine intervention” in our meeting in his office on Dec. 5.

    He said, in effect, “Mr. Matthews, there’s no medical reason why you’re here today. And while I would like to take the credit, your recovery transcends my medical skills and experience.”

    It was Dr. Kommor who had called in Hosparus in mid-November when it appeared that my time on earth was short…very short.

  • Find compassion, respect for each other

    It is frustrating and saddening to see in letters to this paper the anger and disrespect with which some people view others across the political divide.

    I believe that the vast preponderance of Americans on both sides of the political spectrum are people of good will who want the best for our country.

    I like and trust those people that I know personally who did not vote as I did for president.

  • Every January since 2009 The Sentinel-News has established a blueprint for the coming year to help focus on ideas, concepts and circumstances that deserve – or require – our attention.

    Every year since 2010, we have issued a report card to review how well the community has responded to those goals. Sometimes new issues rush in and steal our momentum – like our unplanned but huge response to a growing heroin issue – but generally we have at the end of the year developed a grade for how we have fared as a community.

  • I opened the E-mail with an almost, “oh, no” feeling.

    After all, it was the Sunday morning after Thanksgiving, and if a parent was emailing a teacher and I was copied, chances are someone was angry.

    I was wrong. Yet at first, I didn’t know it.

    She began with how things had gone so wrong for so many years. Her words dripped with sadness and regret. I felt it.

  • With apologies to Clement Moore:

    Twas midnight on Christmas, and all through the land.

    The party was roaring, there was plenty of bourbon on hand.

    The children were restless, Christmas dancing in their heads.

    There was so much noise, they barely could stay in their beds.

    And I in my best Eddie Bauer and Mom in her new rabbit wrap

    Were just sitting in our corner, asking our server for a nightcap.

    When outside by the parking lot, we heard a big ol’ noise.

  • It turns out I hate oak trees.

    Sure they grow big and full, provide tons of shade and are a very hearty hardwood that makes for great furniture, floors and even firewood.

    But they are also the bane of my existence come late fall and into winter.

    I have two giant oak trees in my front yard and for three, or maybe two-and-a-half, seasons they are wonderful.

  • For more than 30 years Glenn and Dennis Moore have been servicing Shelby County.

    Now ready to take some time off, the Moores are planning to put their feet and rest a while, a well-deserved rest too.

    And while their decision to retire and close the shop is a loss for the driving public of Shelby County, we still marvel at the time they put in making sure our cars were running and safe.

  • We were pleased to see the Shelby County Fiscal Court move forward last week and pass an alcohol ordinance that included Sunday package sales.

    The court saw the ability to expand our services while upholding the will of the people after residents in Shelby County overwhelmingly voted to make the county wet earlier this year.

    Now, just because we are in favor of the new expanded alcohol sales and adding them on Sunday doesn’t mean we want to see a liquor store on every corner… and we won’t.

  • Over the last several decades Black Friday has been known to bring out the worst in people.

    We’ve all seen it – shoppers trampled, pushed, shoved, cursed at and fighting over a cheap TV or the must-have holiday toy of the season.

    It’s the saddest display of what a consumer driven society can do to people.

    And while shoppers can be difficult to deal with throughout the holiday season, one troubling trend we’ve seen across the commonwealth, and even nationwide, is the rudeness going both ways.

  • Saturday was a big day – and not just because of the instant classic that the universities of Kentucky and Louisville turned in on the football field – it was the day the Martin clan decided to go out and get the season’s Christmas tree.

    I love Christmas – the tree, decorating, the lights, everything and especially with young children.

  • If the Shelbyville City Council has the opportunity to help a local business succeed and no other businesses or individuals would be harmed or displaced because of it, should it not take that option?

    That obvious answer to that question is yes, especially when they annexed and helped put laws in place for that business so it could get started.

    But the council seems to have mixed feelings on helping Jeptha Creed Distillery be able to reach its full potential.

  •  I find myself in a bit of Christmas quandary this week.

    See, the plan in our house this year was to try to instill the Christmas spirit in our 7-year-old son.

    And I don’t mean a big tree – we’ve covered that – more lights and few extra trips to see Santa.

    No, we have that part covered.

    Our kids love Christmas, and they could not be more excited for it to get here. If I’ve heard “I wish today was Christmas morning!” once, I’ve heard it 50 times.

  • What could have been a scary situation was handled calmly, coolly and with the upmost care Saturday when store personnel and county officials quickly handled a potential bomb scare at Walmart in Shelbyville.

    A store employee had noticed a suspicious suitcase sitting outside the Tire and Lube center of the store and alerted store management, who then calmly evacuated the store.

    From there our county officials took over, calling in a bomb squad from Lexington.

  • Apple pie, homemade ice cream, hamburgers and American flags, houses and families nationwide will be decked out in their Red, White and Blue best this weekend to celebrate the 4th of July.

    Barbecues will dot the landscape in the afternoon and early evening before an overabundance of colors takes over our night sky.

  • As senators from Kentucky, we’ve been fortunate to meet the many farmers who help make our state work. Agriculture is a vital part of Kentucky’s economy, and we’ve learned from Kentucky’s farmers that one way to keep our state’s agricultural sector growing is to explore new, viable cash crops for the state. This is why we’ve put our support behind expanding industrial hemp research.