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Opinion

  • Fairness is the Christian way

     

    In the article about the City Council’s non-action on the proposed Fairness Ordinance, one councilman was quoted as saying, “This is a very Christian community whether you want to recognize that or not.”

    I do recognize that we are a Christian community. In my opinion, our belief in Christian values compels us to support a Fairness Ordinance and is precisely the reason such an ordinance must be enacted.

     

     

  • After reading Pastor [Dave] Charlton’s column [The inevitability of a Fairness Ordinance, Aug. 15 in the Faith section] it appears many Christians would disagree with the Pastor.

    While we agree that no citizen of this nation should be discriminated against for their lifestyles, in most situations, this ordinance or law would bring many other factors into being that is unfavorable.

  • College football season kicks off this week and with that comes a lot of chatter about who is number one.

    Alabama and Florida State are drawing the most attention from the pundits, but there are dark horses.

    Some experts like Georgia, UCLA or Big 12 titan Oklahoma, but there is one that everyone is overlooking, in fact many never think of it.

    Shelby County, Kentucky is making a strong claim for Number 1.

  • Impressed by interns

     

    Dear Editor:

    Time and time again we hear about how the younger generation doesn’t have the same values and goals in life as they use to.  Well, we are here to tell you that we don’t agree at all. 

  • As the time to collect signatures slips away, we think it’s important to remind our community what a vote to make our county wet would mean.

    First and foremost, signing the petition does not make the county’s change to wet a “done deal” as some seem to think.

    Instead, it only gives the opportunity for the people to decide.

    Secondly, this decision is solely an economic one, it has very little to do with drinking.

  • School is underway once again and we’re off to a great start. We have clear goals for this school year both in the state’s accountability system and in our local strategic plan. These goals carry on the momentum with which we ended last school year. State test scores from last year are beginning to be reported, and the news about our college and career readiness measures is positive.

  • Joseph Ellis in his book “Founding Brothers” nailed it when he said, “It seems safe to say that some sort of representative government based on the principle of popular sovereignty and some form of market economy fueled by the energies of individual citizens have become the commonly accepted ingredients for natural success throughout the world.”

    How more succinctly could he put it? What is so hard to understand? What is wrong with being FREE to choose your own destiny?

  • Continued outlet mall traffic worries

     

    To Shelby County Road department, our magistrate, KY Hwy district 5 and Simpsonville government,

    This is my second letter concerning the outlet mall traffic; someone is going to be injured over this bad planning.

  • In the April edition of Readers Digest there is an article by David Brooks, an op-ed columnist for the New York Times entitled “The Stem and the Flower.”

  • I would like to thank Linda Ethington for her compassionate letter (Animal Rights, Page A4, July 16) concerning the plight of chained dogs, and to let her know that there are people fighting for this cause.

    On July 28th from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Dogs Deserve Better (DDB) founder Tamira Thayne chained herself to a doghouse on the Capitol steps in Frankfort to bring attention to the plight of chained and penned dogs. Representatives from Speak Out and Rescue (SOAR) and the Franklin County Humane Society joined her.

  • A recent encounter with some local medical professionals has left me wondering how, and why, there is a facility in Shelbyville known as a “hospital.”  After dealing with my father’s passing in January 2014, my mother had two questionable mammograms this spring, which lead her doctor to prescribe a needle biopsy, or a stereotactic biopsy.  The procedure was scheduled for June 23, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. at Shelbyville’s Jewish Hospital.

  • This back and forth between the Shelbyville City Council and the Shelby County chapter of Kentuckians for the Commonwealth needs to end.

    At this point, both sides are getting tired of hearing the other speak and we’re all just spinning wheels.

    The most recent dialogue – we won’t really call it a conversation because neither side seems to be listening at this point – seemed to leave both council members and visitors exasperated.

  • A few weeks ago, a large crowd of family and friends turned out to celebrate the landmark birthday of a man whose landmark enterprise helped to feed a generation of you.

    This man in 1967 set up shop at the far eastern extreme of Shelbyville, where he began to cook up burgers and rings to feed the McDonald’s-less, fast-food-craving young masses of Shelby County, which he accomplished to an amazing level of success.

    That restaurant was Burger Queen, and its king was LaMar Nutt.

  • As a new school year gets underway today, we want to take the time to congratulate all those involved.

    It’s no easy feat to get 11 schools, each with their own set of employees, cafeterias, maintenance crews and more, ready each year.

    It’s not easy for teachers to get those classrooms and lesson plans ready to stimulate young minds and get them prepared to face the rigors and tests ahead in the new school year.

  • The Shelbyville American Legion Post 37 baseball team wrapped up its fifth state title on Friday, earning a trip to the regional tournament later this week in Ashboro, N.C.

    This squad put together one of the best seasons in Shelby County history going 25-1 in the regular season and steam rolling the state tournament.

    What makes it even more impressive is that manager Jim Wiley continues to man the helm of a team that he’s led for 30 years.

  • Country road bicyclists

  • There’s a running commercial for a credit card company that asks the question, “What’s in your wallet?” The implication of the question is that the credit card you choose to carry says something significant about you.

    Of course, the intention of the ad is to convince us that a discerning individual wants to make sure they are carrying this company’s credit card.  Though I do not completely buy the sales pitch of this commercial, I have come to realize that what we choose to carry through our daily life says something about us.

  • Our normally sleepy, quiet community got quite the wake-up this past week.

    While the Shelbyville Horse Show normally perks up the area, it was even bigger and better than normal this year as it celebrated its 25th anniversary.

    One of the top shows in the country, the annual showcase of Saddlebreds brings in dozens of former World Champions as they prepare for the Kentucky State Fair World Championship, which begins next week.

  • This is from an article in the Wall St. Journal on July 19 entitled “This Way Up” featuring 18-year-old Dakota Blazier who will forgo a college degree in favor of a blue-collar career. He will join the 70 percent of Americans 25-and-older without college degrees.

  • We usually avoid state or national commentary preferring to stay focused on our backyard, but sometimes issues affect us all and we feel the need to call attention to these two stories that recently came across our desk.