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Opinion

  • In 1923 Ataturk told the new country he forged from the Ottoman Empire, “No matter how great they are, political and military victories cannot endure unless they are crowned by economic triumphs.”

    Truer words were never spoken.

    If we survive the multitude of messes we’re in — the conflict between Russia and her former satellites, the surging power of the Islamic terrorists, our impossible national debt, and an oppressive and dictorial government — will we turn back to the economic system that built this country?

  • Tonight my family experienced the most beautiful form of humbleness in an act so simple yet so grand I cant stop smiling about it even now, hours later.

    I have come to a point in my life where I can no longer bear to watch the news anymore, so much destruction, so much hate, so many bad things happening, it just makes me sad and gives me a sense of defeat for our world. 

    So my husband and I decided we had to share our experience tonight [Sunday], to remind others, including ourselves, of the good that still remains.

  • In 2009 our community formed a Human Rights Commission, one that could answer for the people if they felt they had been wronged.

    The commission, a joint effort by Shelby County Fiscal Court, Shelbyville City Council and Simpsonville City Commission, is a wonderful asset to our community.

    In theory, the commission is here to ensure that we as a community maintain our civil standards – that we all are protected and able to enjoy our inherent rights as a person.

  • Jessica Collins has received yet another form of recognition for her ministry A Place to Sleep.

    Collins, who has been recognized across the state and nation for her work, was recently named one of two Bell Award Youth Service Honor Recipient by WLKY.

    The Bell Awards program recognizes individuals who have demonstrated the true “spirit of Louisville” through selfless volunteer efforts and seeks to inspire all residents to engage in community service.

    Although it is recognized for work in the Louisville area, we proudly call Collins our own.

  • Healthy school lunches for healthy kids

     

    Dear Editor,

    With the new school year, parents’ attention is turning to school lunches.

    Traditionally, USDA had used the National School Lunch Program as a dumping ground for surplus meat and dairy commodities. Children consumed animal fat and sugary drinks, to the point where one-third have became overweight or obese. Their early dietary flaws became lifelong addictions, raising their risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

  • Praise for S.A.I.L. program

     

    I would like to commend every member of the Shelby County School Board for choosing to fund S.A.I.L. this summer.

  • When Mitchell Howard Payne entered Southside Elementary in 1957 as a second-grader, he was among the first blacks to integrate the Shelbyville school system.

    I usually sat or lined up beside him because students were often in alphabetical order in those days. That was a blessing because we have remained friends all these many years. When the 1957 building was demolished over the summer, we reflected on our experiences.

  • The weather report for this weekend show temperatures in the mid-70s with lows dipping into the upper 40s – perfect fall weather to be outside.

    What better way to spend a weekend than at a community festival?

    This year’s schedule is already packed with community celebrations every weekend this month ranging from Simpsonville to Finchville to Shelbyville and back.

  • At the end of August we learned that Shelby County Public Schools would go a second straight year without raising its property tax rate.

    And we must say, we find that pretty amazing.

    Most districts around the state have approved an increase of some degree, and many taking the full four percent they are allowed without going to a public vote.

  • The book “Our Founding Brotherhood” is about six men who were the moving spirit of the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights and our Constitution. They decided that the issue of slavery should not even be put on the table. They were right. I’m convinced they knew in their hearts slavery was doomed because it was morally wrong and it made no economic sense. Adam Smith pointed this out in 1750, but they would never have gotten it passed with slavery an issue.

  • Agrees with invocations

     

    Regarding My Word/Linda Allewalt, “Why secular invocation is important,” [July 30th 2014 issue of The Sentinel-News].

    Like most other citizens, this author sees no more importance in secular invocation than one would in a commercial for a fast food chain. By definition – invocation is any sort of speech – i.e., a public address, hail, salute, lecture or pronouncement.

  • Often viewed as simply the unofficial ending to summer, Labor Day generally arrives with maybe a barbeque, one last pool party and, of course, the return of college football.

    But we applaud the communities of Martinsville and Waddy for reminding us that Labor Day should provide us with a reason to come together.

    A celebration of our American workforce, we all too often just see it as a day of rest – which since we all work we all should enjoy – but forget about the celebration part.

  • As our community continues to discuss issues that affect us, it’s important to remember that we are not working in a vacuum here in Shelby County.

    According to a report on the Washington Post a man last week was kicked out of a town meeting in Winter Garden, Fla., for failing to stand during the opening prayer and Pledge of Allegiance.

    Of course, we too have had individuals choose not to stand during invocations at our local meetings, although we do not recall them not standing during the pledge.

  • In the same vein of economic spurring, we congratulate Diageo and the Bulleit Bourbon Co. for its grand groundbreaking last week, making it the first distillery to begin it’s operation in Shelby County.

    We can’t wait for the new $115 million facility to be completed on Benson Pike, putting Shelby County in place to join Franklin, Anderson, Woodford and Nelson counties on the Bourbon Trail.

  • In one of his presentations to the [Shelbyville] City Council on the issue of prayer in government, Rich Lane warned of the slippery slope that always lurks nearby when religion and government mix.

    The city council meeting on August 7th was an absolute prime example of Mr. Lane’s warning.

  • People around the world have been chanting “No Justice, No Peace” after Michael Brown was executed by Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, MO. 

    I myself have been chanting “No Justice, No Peace” throughout the streets of Ferguson.  We want justice, but how do we get it?    The evident incompetence of the local police, mayor, and governor has made it impossible to keep the peace.  Protesters continue to march and the media continues to make revisions to their stories of what actually took place rather than the truth. 

  • Fairness is the Christian way

     

    In the article about the City Council’s non-action on the proposed Fairness Ordinance, one councilman was quoted as saying, “This is a very Christian community whether you want to recognize that or not.”

    I do recognize that we are a Christian community. In my opinion, our belief in Christian values compels us to support a Fairness Ordinance and is precisely the reason such an ordinance must be enacted.

     

     

  • After reading Pastor [Dave] Charlton’s column [The inevitability of a Fairness Ordinance, Aug. 15 in the Faith section] it appears many Christians would disagree with the Pastor.

    While we agree that no citizen of this nation should be discriminated against for their lifestyles, in most situations, this ordinance or law would bring many other factors into being that is unfavorable.

  • College football season kicks off this week and with that comes a lot of chatter about who is number one.

    Alabama and Florida State are drawing the most attention from the pundits, but there are dark horses.

    Some experts like Georgia, UCLA or Big 12 titan Oklahoma, but there is one that everyone is overlooking, in fact many never think of it.

    Shelby County, Kentucky is making a strong claim for Number 1.

  • Impressed by interns

     

    Dear Editor:

    Time and time again we hear about how the younger generation doesn’t have the same values and goals in life as they use to.  Well, we are here to tell you that we don’t agree at all.