• Guns, NRA not to blame

    The letter by Becky Simpson (“How do we stop these senseless deaths” on page A4 of the Feb. 28 issue of The Sentinel-News) contains 15 questions, some of which I can answer.

  • Here we are, right smack dab in the middle of National Sunshine Week, and the Kentucky Legislature is as cloudy as the weather.
    Sunshine Week, March 11-17, celebrates transparency in government and promotes Sunshine Laws in place so citizens can know what their government is doing by highlighting the importance of open records, meetings and freedom of information.
    The same day the Kentucky House of Representatives recognized House Resolution 220, in honor of Sunshine Week, House Bill 200 was received in the Senate Committee of Appropriations and Revenue.

  • In Oct. 2010, The Sentinel-News published my letter entitled “GOP Surges Past 10,000.” To summarize, I provided a brief history of the demographics of both population and voter registration of Shelby County since 1982.

    I also predicted “it’s not unreasonable to envision the two parties flipping before the end of this decade.” That flip from Democrat to Republican majority in Shelby County will occur in 2018.

  • Thanks for sharing the music

    I am writing on behalf of the First Presbyterian Church, members of the music departments of Shelby County schools and for all the students who have received musical instruments through our Musical Instrument Program to express our sincere appreciation for the support The Sentinel-News has provided for the program over the years.

    We began this program in 2003 and on Dec. 12, 2017, we experienced an event which I believe is worth noting – the donation of the 100th instrument.

  • While shoppers have been scouring Main Street and the outlet mall for the perfect gifts, Shelby County has been scrambling to close the year with a boom.

    Just this month we’ll have discussion of a new proposed distillery along Interstate 64 in Waddy, the Shelby County Board of Education is looking into the purchase of the Jefferson Community and Technical Shelby Campus, and Main Street in Shelbyville is bursting with new opportunities.

  • Concerned with pension reform proposal

    I am deeply concerned about the pension reform framework recently made public.

    These proposals challenge the contract rights of members, lower the standard of living of employees now and in retirement, and will worsen the cash-flow crisis in the state employee pension plan.

  • About 80 years ago Shelby County, along with the nation and the world, stopped to watch the court proceedings on Main Street in Shelbyville.

    The Garr brothers were standing trial for the alleged murder of Brig. Gen. Henry Denhardt, and everyone waited to see the verdict of what appeared to be revenge for the alleged murder of the Garr’s sister, Verna.

    And back in the Shelby County Courthouse this weekend, visitors watched the trial unfold again.

  • “Good Land, Good Living, Good People” is Shelby County’s motto. I know that motto is at least 60 years old, and, I believe, the late Briggs Lawson originated it.

    My apologies if I have the attribution wrong, and many thanks to the person(s) who will soon set me straight if I do.

    I do know the former marketing specialist, civic leader and haberdasher used the slogan in his ads and letters about this community he loved and held such great pride in.

  • In today’s issue we’ve tried to find ways to help you spruce up your holidays. From the table to the decorations to our community, we want to help you make this season your best.

    But for it to be the best, it will take more than a new dish for Thanksgiving, more than stylish new decorations for your mantle or your tree and certainly more than the hottest new toy under your Christmas tree.

    What will it take to make this year the best? How about we spread that cheer like never before?

  • VA not quite underfunded

    Breathe Ken, Breathe…

    I wish my good friend Ken Pratt would slow down a bit.

  • Every day, 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 years old, and up to 85 percent of them are living with at least one serious illness.

    That translates to millions of adults living with chronic diseases that may shorten their life expectancy and dramatically impact their quality of life.

    Without a coordinated care plan, many patients are caught in the revolving door of emergency rooms and doctors’ offices, incurring millions of dollars in unnecessary health care costs, not to mention creating needless stress for both patients and their family caregivers.

  • Thousands roamed the street in Shelbyville Saturday, waiting to bask in the glow.

    The city’s annual Celebration of Lights culminated with the pop of the holiday season’s red, green, orange and blue bulbs.

    Downtown Shelbyville is now awash in color and Simpsonville will soon join this weekend, marking Shelby County as one of the first communities in the state to dive head first into the holidays.

  • Thanks for first responders’ event

    I would like to thank Shelbyville First Baptist Church for putting on a great program for Shelby County.

    Sept. 8-10 they had a complete program for first responders in Shelby County. This weekend was a fantastic experience not only for first responders but also for all citizens.

  • Recently, a Facebook group commemorated the life of my high school homeroom teacher. She welcomed groups of teenagers for years at SCHS.

    I remember going to her when I had clothing that was dysfunctional and needed safety pins or a needle and thread. She often baked cookies for her homeroom and always had a smile. The comments beneath the obituary came from generations of people who had warm thoughts and sincere empathy for her family.

  • Successful summer reading program


    Letter to the Editor

    I would like to thank all of the Shelby County children and youth, along with their parents, grandparents and caregivers, who participated in our “Build a Better World” summer reading program for 2017. We had more than 1,300 children and youth sign up for the summer reading program, with almost 800 completing the program. Well done!

  • Most people get mail every day, Monday through Saturday. But what happens when the mail comes later than we expect?

    We found out a few years ago, when the Postmaster General had to take away overnight First-Class and Periodicals mail from most of the nation. That caused a problem for a lot of consumers and businesses. Now we may be facing a new slowdown, if Congress doesn’t do something very soon.

    Who needs the mail, some people ask? We have the Internet now.

  • Well that was fun!

    The build up was immense, the hype beyond anything even the sporting world could produce.

    But the solar eclipse lived up to its billing as one of the greatest celestial shows on earth.

    Maybe Shelby County wasn’t in the path of totality and maybe it’s didn’t get dark enough to fool our bats into coming out and our chickens into going in to roost.

    It turns out about 5 percent of the sun is still a lot of light.

  • Stunned by starlings


    Many of us enjoy walking around our lovely neighborhood of Country Manor. However, around 8:30 every evening we are disgusted by the swarms of thousands of starlings in the unmowed/unkept property located at the north end.

    Compound the noise with the nasty odor of their waste that is also evident, and it's quite repulsive AND unhealthy.

  • I have an annual guy’s camping weekend each August, and this year it just so happened to be this past weekend.

    It’s a lot of fun. We build a campfire and cook over open flames, we stay up late telling stories and then we hit the water on Saturday in a couple of rented pontoon boats and mostly act like we’re still in our 20s.

  • Facebook has been flooded recently with people taking photos of and waxing poetic about the old water tower in downtown Shelbyville.

    As crews started working on taking it down over the weekend – and work will continue this weekend – we heard more and more people lament its removal.

    We, too, were sad to see it go, but changes are necessary.

    Water company manager Tom Doyle said last week that it would cost more than $300,000 just to bring it up to current safety standards.