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Opinion

  • As senators from Kentucky, we’ve been fortunate to meet the many farmers who help make our state work. Agriculture is a vital part of Kentucky’s economy, and we’ve learned from Kentucky’s farmers that one way to keep our state’s agricultural sector growing is to explore new, viable cash crops for the state. This is why we’ve put our support behind expanding industrial hemp research.

  • “The Greatest of All Time”

    Dear Editor:

    My brother and I went to Louisville last Friday to watch Muhammad Ali’s casket pass by. I will never forget that day. An overwhelming feeling of love and peace pervaded; everyone united in their grief and respect for “The Greatest of All Time.”

  • Former NFL player and coach Herman Edwards can often be found giving opinions on ESPN during football season, and if you go back and listen you can see that Edwards is not very fond of social media platforms, especially Twitter.

    Edwards – who often times is brought in to discuss the moral high ground of decisions along with the X’s and O’s of the game – has a favorite quote when it comes to the instant response time of Tweets: “Don’t hit send.”

  •  Conserving all our natural resources

    Dear Editor:

    With the 47th annual observance of Earth Day, this is a great time to explore more effective ways of slowing climate change and conserving Earth’s natural resources for future generations.

  •  The Shelby County Fiscal Court’s decision to take on the work to let the people vote on the county’s wet/dry/moist status should be met with great applause.

    The idea of allowing package liquor sales in the county is not a new one, but this is the first time the county has lent its full support to the cause.

    Last week the court approved setting aside $15,000 to help attain the signatures needed to get the decision put on the ballot.

  • Republicans all across Kentucky will hold presidential caucuses on March 5 to choose their preferred nominee for president. The caucus is the only chance Kentucky Republicans have to vote for the presidential nominee. There will still be a May 17 primary election for other races, such as State Representative and Shelbyville City Council.

  • Congress needs to work together, not against each other

    Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky), Sen. Rand Paul (R-Kentucky) and numerous other senators may have forgotten their “Oath of Office”, when they said they would not even consider a Supreme Court Judge nomination by the current President.  Their Oath of Office is as follows:

  • At what point do we realize that we have already cut to the quick in education?

    The bleeding will not stop, and the newest band-aid will likely need to be applied on our community college system.

    Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget calls for spending cut of 4.5 percent for postsecondary education institutions for the remainder of this fiscal year followed by a whopping 9 percent cut included in budget.

  • Working to find the right answers for our city

    This week I received a note in the mail to our restaurant, Bell House. It was not signed and had no return address. The letter stated that they would not be back in our restaurant and would not vote for me in the next election.

      First of all I appreciate the letter and do respect the one who wrote it, even though they didn’t have the decency to sign it.

  • For the past several months a small Southern Indiana community has been a part of the national news because of an HIV epidemic.

    Scott County, Ind., has a little more than half the population of Shelby County, and Scottsburg, the county seat, is a little less than half the size of Shelbyville.

    In Scott County the leading issue has been Opana, an opiod used for severe pain.

    Users will melt the pills to shoot up for a quicker, more intense high.

  • Political correctness has taken several big hits lately, and it’s about time.

    Those who pursue this ideology thrive on intimidation, which frequently causes its victims to surrender because they adopt a “go along to get along” attitude.

    Some of the “buzz words” that infect the political correctness approach include identity, gender-neutral, diverse, inclusive, workplace harassment, dead white males, racism, sexism, privileged, hate speech, prayer in schools, affirmative action, respecting our differences and much more.

  • Charter schools hurt public education

    Dear Editor:

    It never ceases to amaze me the silly bills some legislatures want to get passed with false information.

    Take the one about starting charter schools. You cannot improve education by taking money out of a system to start a new system. This will just weaken the current system more.

    Privatizing schools in other states has not worked. It’s true some schools are not up to par but that could be corrected by putting more money into the school system.

  • While the Simpsonville City Commission handles the day-to-day issues of the city, it’s shown time and time again that it has at least one eye focused squarely on the future.

    And that has never been more evident than at Thursday’s meeting.

    City commissioners, Mayor Steve Eden and staff discussed the budget, salt for the roads for this week’s winter weather, road projects and hiring an attorney to help with the possible addition of a high speed Internet franchise agreement.

  • Helping the city’s premier event

    After reading the Wednesday, Jan. 20 editorial “What We Think: Dividing up the tourism tax so we all get a bite” in The Sentinel-Newsregarding the use of the tourism taxes, please consider helping with the expenses of the one event that showcases all of Shelbyville and Shelby County –The Shelbyville Horse Show.

    This show is supported by the community, but never breaks even with the expenses.

  • More than six months ago Shelby County lost one of its major auto dealers when the Jeff Wyler Group closed the doors on its Chevrolet Buick GMC dealership on the west end of Shelbyville.

    Located on Taylorsville Road the site had long since been an auto dealer, welcoming patrons into Shelbyville on one of our busiest roads.

    Now the lot still sits empty, begging for another dealership to meet our needs.

  • Fed up in Hi Point

    It appears that once again the City of Shelbyville is penalizing citizens who meet their obligations of payment, while the city has not met their obligation to manage and collect. The Mayor [Tom Hardesty] and the city council have made it a habit to require Hi Point Village, Phase 1 residents to pay extra on their yearly bond assessment when faced with a deficit.

  • We are happy to see two new developments planned for the east side of Shelbyville on Mount Eden Road.

    As a main entrance to our county seat, our zoning commission has approved a solid plan for those looking to build here, and we believe some expansion on the east side is certainly warranted.

    Although more would be needed to create a perfect balance between the east and west sides of the city, and even the county, we see this as a solid start.

  • Making a statement

    As we enjoyed our Christmas with above average temperatures, all the folks I came into contact with remarked how happy they were with the warm weather, particularly after the last two brutally cold winters. I then thought maybe this global warming nonsense might be true. Wouldn’t it be great to grow food later in the year and feed the hungry? But alas, like every other Liberal Democrat promise, it was short-lived.

  • On Jan. 1, the city of Shelbyville’s tourism tax kicked in, meaning an extra 3 percent tax has been added to restaurants, lunch counters and certain items from grocery and convenient stores.

    Now that it is in place, we can stop the discussion about whether we want the new tax or if it is warranted, and instead focus on where the money can be spent.

  • Shelby County Public Schools’ strategic plan centers on personalized learning for students through a digital conversion. This simply means that we seek to accelerate student learning by tailoring the instructional environment – what, when, how and where students learn – to address the individual needs, skills and interests of each student.

    In this model, students take ownership of their own learning and develop deep relationships with other like-minded learners.