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Opinion

  • Praise for S.A.I.L. program

     

    I would like to commend every member of the Shelby County School Board for choosing to fund S.A.I.L. this summer.

  • When Mitchell Howard Payne entered Southside Elementary in 1957 as a second-grader, he was among the first blacks to integrate the Shelbyville school system.

    I usually sat or lined up beside him because students were often in alphabetical order in those days. That was a blessing because we have remained friends all these many years. When the 1957 building was demolished over the summer, we reflected on our experiences.

  • The weather report for this weekend show temperatures in the mid-70s with lows dipping into the upper 40s – perfect fall weather to be outside.

    What better way to spend a weekend than at a community festival?

    This year’s schedule is already packed with community celebrations every weekend this month ranging from Simpsonville to Finchville to Shelbyville and back.

  • At the end of August we learned that Shelby County Public Schools would go a second straight year without raising its property tax rate.

    And we must say, we find that pretty amazing.

    Most districts around the state have approved an increase of some degree, and many taking the full four percent they are allowed without going to a public vote.

  • The book “Our Founding Brotherhood” is about six men who were the moving spirit of the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights and our Constitution. They decided that the issue of slavery should not even be put on the table. They were right. I’m convinced they knew in their hearts slavery was doomed because it was morally wrong and it made no economic sense. Adam Smith pointed this out in 1750, but they would never have gotten it passed with slavery an issue.

  • Agrees with invocations

     

    Regarding My Word/Linda Allewalt, “Why secular invocation is important,” [July 30th 2014 issue of The Sentinel-News].

    Like most other citizens, this author sees no more importance in secular invocation than one would in a commercial for a fast food chain. By definition – invocation is any sort of speech – i.e., a public address, hail, salute, lecture or pronouncement.

  • Often viewed as simply the unofficial ending to summer, Labor Day generally arrives with maybe a barbeque, one last pool party and, of course, the return of college football.

    But we applaud the communities of Martinsville and Waddy for reminding us that Labor Day should provide us with a reason to come together.

    A celebration of our American workforce, we all too often just see it as a day of rest – which since we all work we all should enjoy – but forget about the celebration part.

  • As our community continues to discuss issues that affect us, it’s important to remember that we are not working in a vacuum here in Shelby County.

    According to a report on the Washington Post a man last week was kicked out of a town meeting in Winter Garden, Fla., for failing to stand during the opening prayer and Pledge of Allegiance.

    Of course, we too have had individuals choose not to stand during invocations at our local meetings, although we do not recall them not standing during the pledge.

  • In the same vein of economic spurring, we congratulate Diageo and the Bulleit Bourbon Co. for its grand groundbreaking last week, making it the first distillery to begin it’s operation in Shelby County.

    We can’t wait for the new $115 million facility to be completed on Benson Pike, putting Shelby County in place to join Franklin, Anderson, Woodford and Nelson counties on the Bourbon Trail.

  • In one of his presentations to the [Shelbyville] City Council on the issue of prayer in government, Rich Lane warned of the slippery slope that always lurks nearby when religion and government mix.

    The city council meeting on August 7th was an absolute prime example of Mr. Lane’s warning.

  • People around the world have been chanting “No Justice, No Peace” after Michael Brown was executed by Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, MO. 

    I myself have been chanting “No Justice, No Peace” throughout the streets of Ferguson.  We want justice, but how do we get it?    The evident incompetence of the local police, mayor, and governor has made it impossible to keep the peace.  Protesters continue to march and the media continues to make revisions to their stories of what actually took place rather than the truth. 

  • Fairness is the Christian way

     

    In the article about the City Council’s non-action on the proposed Fairness Ordinance, one councilman was quoted as saying, “This is a very Christian community whether you want to recognize that or not.”

    I do recognize that we are a Christian community. In my opinion, our belief in Christian values compels us to support a Fairness Ordinance and is precisely the reason such an ordinance must be enacted.

     

     

  • After reading Pastor [Dave] Charlton’s column [The inevitability of a Fairness Ordinance, Aug. 15 in the Faith section] it appears many Christians would disagree with the Pastor.

    While we agree that no citizen of this nation should be discriminated against for their lifestyles, in most situations, this ordinance or law would bring many other factors into being that is unfavorable.

  • College football season kicks off this week and with that comes a lot of chatter about who is number one.

    Alabama and Florida State are drawing the most attention from the pundits, but there are dark horses.

    Some experts like Georgia, UCLA or Big 12 titan Oklahoma, but there is one that everyone is overlooking, in fact many never think of it.

    Shelby County, Kentucky is making a strong claim for Number 1.

  • Impressed by interns

     

    Dear Editor:

    Time and time again we hear about how the younger generation doesn’t have the same values and goals in life as they use to.  Well, we are here to tell you that we don’t agree at all. 

  • As the time to collect signatures slips away, we think it’s important to remind our community what a vote to make our county wet would mean.

    First and foremost, signing the petition does not make the county’s change to wet a “done deal” as some seem to think.

    Instead, it only gives the opportunity for the people to decide.

    Secondly, this decision is solely an economic one, it has very little to do with drinking.

  • School is underway once again and we’re off to a great start. We have clear goals for this school year both in the state’s accountability system and in our local strategic plan. These goals carry on the momentum with which we ended last school year. State test scores from last year are beginning to be reported, and the news about our college and career readiness measures is positive.

  • Joseph Ellis in his book “Founding Brothers” nailed it when he said, “It seems safe to say that some sort of representative government based on the principle of popular sovereignty and some form of market economy fueled by the energies of individual citizens have become the commonly accepted ingredients for natural success throughout the world.”

    How more succinctly could he put it? What is so hard to understand? What is wrong with being FREE to choose your own destiny?

  • Continued outlet mall traffic worries

     

    To Shelby County Road department, our magistrate, KY Hwy district 5 and Simpsonville government,

    This is my second letter concerning the outlet mall traffic; someone is going to be injured over this bad planning.

  • In the April edition of Readers Digest there is an article by David Brooks, an op-ed columnist for the New York Times entitled “The Stem and the Flower.”