.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • I’ve heard local and state officials say – off the record, of course – the only thing Kentucky has going for it is cheap energy.

    The Alpha Natural Resources Co. says they may close 11 coal mines in West Virginia and lay off 1,100 workers. They found out they can ship coal by sea from the country of Columbia up the east coast for about half the cost of shipping it by rail from Kentucky. What’s more, they say it is easier to get out the ground and burns more efficiently. As if we didn’t have enough to worry about.

  • Stop avoiding Fairness Ordinance issue

     

    Dear Sentinel-News,

     

    It is both surprising and disturbing that just before an election year, our Shelby County officials from Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty to the [Shelby County] Human Rights Commission – formed in 2009 in Shelby County – are avoiding and postponing action on the Fairness Ordinance which other communities have passed.

  • Last week we all found out about a Great-horned Owl that was trapped in the steeple of Centenary United Methodist Church.

    It seems the owl was chasing a pigeon when it became trapped in the tower.

    Lucky for the great bird, the church was beginning a renovation project on the tower and the crew from Thoroughbred Contractors is a pretty honest and ethical group.

    The crew spotted the bird, made sure it had some food and water, and then called in a raptor rescue group to help get the beast out.

  • Two of the first dominoes for a proposed downtown city center in Shelbyville fell on Thursday as Shelby County Public Schools joined the Ohio Valley Education Cooperative with a tentative financial commitment.

    The two groups are still waiting for financial commitments from the Shelbyville City Council, Shelby County Fiscal Court and Shelby County Industrial Foundation before they will move forward, but this is as close as we have been to seeing the concept become a reality.

  • Questioning McConnell’s absences

     

    Mitch McConnell has been too busy to attend meetings of the Senate Agriculture Committee for the last four-plus years -- too busy kowtowing to his rich cronies like the Koch brothers and other Washington-area power brokers.

    Mitch doesn’t seem to recognize that agriculture is one of Kentucky’s signature industries and that the state is still working to recover from the loss of what was once its major crop, tobacco.

  • Last weekend the city of Louisville started its ReSurfaced event.

    Behind still-standing facades of three buildings on Louisville’s Main Street, a party pops up on Thursdays through Sundays through the last Sunday in October. There are food trucks, drink service, and live music and plenty of young adults and families enjoying the atmosphere.

    The annual fall event takes advantage of the cool temperatures, a vacant city lot and people’s penchant for eating, drinking and congregating in an outdoor setting. Call it tailgating without the football game.

  • Last week a group of workers from a Texas Roadhouse corporate office descended on the 200 block of 8th Street to help do some minor renovations at the Open Door of Hope men’s shelter.

    Shelbyville resident Kristal Baird led the group, but the amazing part is Baird was the only Shelby County person in the working crew.

    After Baird mentioned working at the facility with another organization, the Texas Roadhouse group jumped at the chance to help.

  • In 1923 Ataturk told the new country he forged from the Ottoman Empire, “No matter how great they are, political and military victories cannot endure unless they are crowned by economic triumphs.”

    Truer words were never spoken.

    If we survive the multitude of messes we’re in — the conflict between Russia and her former satellites, the surging power of the Islamic terrorists, our impossible national debt, and an oppressive and dictorial government — will we turn back to the economic system that built this country?

  • Tonight my family experienced the most beautiful form of humbleness in an act so simple yet so grand I cant stop smiling about it even now, hours later.

    I have come to a point in my life where I can no longer bear to watch the news anymore, so much destruction, so much hate, so many bad things happening, it just makes me sad and gives me a sense of defeat for our world. 

    So my husband and I decided we had to share our experience tonight [Sunday], to remind others, including ourselves, of the good that still remains.

  • In 2009 our community formed a Human Rights Commission, one that could answer for the people if they felt they had been wronged.

    The commission, a joint effort by Shelby County Fiscal Court, Shelbyville City Council and Simpsonville City Commission, is a wonderful asset to our community.

    In theory, the commission is here to ensure that we as a community maintain our civil standards – that we all are protected and able to enjoy our inherent rights as a person.

  • Jessica Collins has received yet another form of recognition for her ministry A Place to Sleep.

    Collins, who has been recognized across the state and nation for her work, was recently named one of two Bell Award Youth Service Honor Recipient by WLKY.

    The Bell Awards program recognizes individuals who have demonstrated the true “spirit of Louisville” through selfless volunteer efforts and seeks to inspire all residents to engage in community service.

    Although it is recognized for work in the Louisville area, we proudly call Collins our own.

  • Healthy school lunches for healthy kids

     

    Dear Editor,

    With the new school year, parents’ attention is turning to school lunches.

    Traditionally, USDA had used the National School Lunch Program as a dumping ground for surplus meat and dairy commodities. Children consumed animal fat and sugary drinks, to the point where one-third have became overweight or obese. Their early dietary flaws became lifelong addictions, raising their risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

  • Praise for S.A.I.L. program

     

    I would like to commend every member of the Shelby County School Board for choosing to fund S.A.I.L. this summer.

  • When Mitchell Howard Payne entered Southside Elementary in 1957 as a second-grader, he was among the first blacks to integrate the Shelbyville school system.

    I usually sat or lined up beside him because students were often in alphabetical order in those days. That was a blessing because we have remained friends all these many years. When the 1957 building was demolished over the summer, we reflected on our experiences.

  • The weather report for this weekend show temperatures in the mid-70s with lows dipping into the upper 40s – perfect fall weather to be outside.

    What better way to spend a weekend than at a community festival?

    This year’s schedule is already packed with community celebrations every weekend this month ranging from Simpsonville to Finchville to Shelbyville and back.

  • At the end of August we learned that Shelby County Public Schools would go a second straight year without raising its property tax rate.

    And we must say, we find that pretty amazing.

    Most districts around the state have approved an increase of some degree, and many taking the full four percent they are allowed without going to a public vote.

  • The book “Our Founding Brotherhood” is about six men who were the moving spirit of the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights and our Constitution. They decided that the issue of slavery should not even be put on the table. They were right. I’m convinced they knew in their hearts slavery was doomed because it was morally wrong and it made no economic sense. Adam Smith pointed this out in 1750, but they would never have gotten it passed with slavery an issue.

  • Agrees with invocations

     

    Regarding My Word/Linda Allewalt, “Why secular invocation is important,” [July 30th 2014 issue of The Sentinel-News].

    Like most other citizens, this author sees no more importance in secular invocation than one would in a commercial for a fast food chain. By definition – invocation is any sort of speech – i.e., a public address, hail, salute, lecture or pronouncement.

  • Often viewed as simply the unofficial ending to summer, Labor Day generally arrives with maybe a barbeque, one last pool party and, of course, the return of college football.

    But we applaud the communities of Martinsville and Waddy for reminding us that Labor Day should provide us with a reason to come together.

    A celebration of our American workforce, we all too often just see it as a day of rest – which since we all work we all should enjoy – but forget about the celebration part.