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Features

  • Fannie Miller is an angel, at least according to national adoption officials.

    Though she couldn’t make it to the ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, Miller, a resident of Pleasureville, was among 140 people from all 50 states honored for their work in the adoption process.

    Kathleen Strottman, executive director of the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute, said Miller was chosen for the honor because of her dedication to adoption and positive child welfare practices.

  • The Finchville Festival, held Saturday and Sunday, was well attended by a crowd who got to enjoy beautiful weather along with good food, friends and a great deal of browsing through a ton of items for sale.

  • Shelbyville native Ruby Lewis is about to embark on her latest venture, co-starring in the national tour of the Queen musical We Will Rock You, which opens later this month.  

    Lewis will play Scaramouche alongside Brian Justin Crum, who was cast in the lead role of Galileo.

  • The weather was perfect for the 24th annual Simpsonville Fall Festival on Saturday.

    A large crowd flocked to the city park and lined up along U.S. 60 for the annual parade in festivities that ran from sunup until after dark.

    There was the traditional Purnell’s Sausage breakfast to get the day under way, more games and rides for kids in a new area designed for them. The parade featured a focus on educators in Shelby County who will serve as grand marshals.

  • Several weeks ago I had a call from Howard Gibbons of Wind Hill Farm, a Thoroughbred-breeding farm in Shelby County. Having read several of my military columns, he inquired if I had ever served with his uncle, a Navy vice admiral. I had not.

    However, while the Navy, especially in wartime, includes several hundred admirals on its rolls, his inquiry was not unreasonable.

  • “He really packed them in,” Linda Mahone, administrative assistant at Shelby County Library, said of an appearance Thursday by so-called ghost hunter Tommy Jones.

    Malone said that what surprised her about Jones’ presentation – which was only supposed to be an hour long but was almost twice that long because of tremendous public interest – was that the crowd was so diverse and asked so many questions.

  • When the Long Run Massacre and Floyd’s Defeat re-enactment begins today, it will mark the 15th year of the historical event, and Kathy Cummings has seen each one of them.

    Cummings, who is now the president of the Painted Stone Settlers, Inc., has been with the group since it started.

  • GRAEFENBURG – “It started in a small space, set aside in the basement,” Stephanie Sorrell said.

    Hand-made sets and props were pulled out on Sunday mornings. A handful of parents and church members gathered with the children of Graefenburg Baptist Church to sing a few songs and share a lesson. Hosanna House was launched from humble beginnings.

    “Children and families showed up!” she said. “They had fun. They invited their friends.”

  • Can you afford on Sunday not to visit and celebrate appreciating your grandparents? Do you remember what special yummy treats they kept in stock for you to enjoy eating when you visited?

    Well if you have grown up now, the tasty treat is still there, but it may have changed form. The really good grandparents “still bear fruit in old age. They stay fresh and green” (Psalm 92:14).

  • The recent disappearance of a small, unremarkable little monument in front of a Simpsonville church has some residents there raising eyebrows – and cain.

    When workers constructing the eastern end of the city’s downtown sidewalk project removed a 3-foot-tall monument that has stood for years in front of Simpsonville Christian Church, phones began to ring around town, particularly that of longtime church member Jake Smith.

  • From livestock to farm equipment to vegetables and crafts, Shelby County did itself proud in the Kentucky State Fair this year, especially the young people, said people who move in those circles.

    “It’s a joy to see young people take such an interest in agriculture,” said Ray Tucker, chair of the A&M Association that puts on the Shelby County Fair.

    “I am so proud of them.”

  • The capabilities of the World Wide Web to extend the horizons of research continue to amaze. In writing about the Pacific campaigns of World War II, I described my fellow officer Don Beck as follows:

  • The auditorium at the Whitney M, Young Jr. Job Corps campus held nearly a packed house Friday as about 300 friends and family members from all over the nation turned out for commencement exercises for the center's 27 graduates.

  • Jeanne Kemper of Bagdad has been so busy cooking and baking for the past month that she has been going nonstop, getting her 45 entries ready to enter in the Kentucky State Fair.

    And as usual, she really cleaned up after all the cooking, earning 33 ribbons in the honey cookery and bread categories – 21 were blue ribbons – as well as the sweepstakes prize for each of those categories.

    But this year – her 28th for competing in the state fair – she said something strange happened that really shocked her.

  • On Thursday night, Steven Lee Cook will do something he has done hundreds of times. He will walk onto a stage, grab a microphone, stare into the lights-hidden faces of thousands and unleash The Voice. He will break into a song you likely have heard and maybe even loved, and he will perform with only one knee-knocking difference from all those other stages and microphones: Cook is now 60 years old, and he hasn’t been part of a big-time performance in two decades, since, well, his voice was his life.

  • Shelby County trainers, riders, breeders and owners have had a hand in dozens of World Champions during the Kentucky State Fair World’s Championship Horse Show, and on Sunday when the 2013 show begins, county representatives will not only be competing for titles but selecting the winners as well.

    For the fourth time, Kim and Fran Crumpler will step into the show ring as judges for the World’s Championship show. The Crumplers, Kim said, take the judging as an honor.

  • Much to the dismay of friends and co-workers, Debbie Lee isn’t entering any of her award-winning cakes in the Kentucky State Fair this year.

    After taking the 2012 Cake Sweepstakes Prize, Lee has set aside cake baking this summer.

    “This summer has seemed a little odd, since I’m not baking cakes,” Lee said.

    She will be back with her needlepoint, though, having won the 2012 Needlepoint Sweepstakes as well. But there is a good reason she has curtailed her cooking.

  • Young visitors to Red Orchard Park on Saturday left no stone unturned in their quest for the perfect way to adorn their new "pets" with colorful stripes, dots and even a pair of bobble eyes.

    "His name is going to be Rocky," said 5-year-old Maggie Martinez, proudly holding up her rock pet for the group of about 10 children to inspect.

    The children, accompanied by parents and, in many cases, grandparents, attended a rock-painting activity at the Miller Education Center, sponsored by Clear Creek Trailblazers.

  • A client recently taught me a helpful little verse:

    Feel your feelings,

    and talk them out.

    Believe your beliefs,

    and act them out.

    I can think of three ways we often violate this helpful little guideline:

  • MOUNT EDEN – This 70-year-old pastor cocked his rifle, aimed and missed.

    Undeterred, he cocked it again, aimed and broke into a huge grin when the BB ricocheted off his mailbox on Cat Ridge Road.

    The preacher is Roy “Junie” Temple Jr., who during last week’s 127 Yard Sale bought something he said he had wanted since he was a child but had never purchased: a BB gun.

    To be specific, a Daisy BB gun that he found for sale at one of the churches along U.S. 127 in Franklin County.

    It cost him all of $5.