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Features

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      Plant and seed catalogs will be jamming the mailbox any day now.  I always feel like January ushers in a clean slate for the garden: optimism abounds among the fresh ideas and new goals; and promises never to repeat a crop-busting mistake are sharp in my memory.

    Sometimes the slate stays clean; sometimes it doesn’t.  Either way the next couple of months can be used to plan and prepare for the next growing season.

  • Morry Wakefield grew up on a farm where he had several unusual pets, including pigs, goats and calves. “Harry” may be his strangest pet to date.

    Harry is a squirrel Wakefield rescued after it fell from a tree during the winds Hurricane Ike brought to the area in mid-September. The squirrel had apparently dropped about 20 feet to the driveway.

    “I was getting ready to leave, and I saw a baby squirrel on the driveway going around in circles,” Wakefield said. “It looked up at me like 'please help me.'”

  • This December has been a cold one thus far.   I don’t mind a gloomy day here or there, I actually find them some what restorative.  Too many in a row, though, can be sort of depressing. 

    We all say we want winter interest, but sometimes we forget about it once spring rolls around and we get excited about a new season.

    Have you selected things that will capture your eye in January?  Look out the window and tell yourself what you see and then take some notes.

  • The big red tom fanned out his tail and dropped his wings, exposing his white flight feathers for the benefit of visitors -- or more likely, the hen turkeys clucking away nearby.

    Little did he know his showing off would get him nowhere, and his strutting days were numbered.

  • Information was gathered from previous years of The Shelby Sentinel, The Shelby News and The Sentinel-News. You can reach the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com.

    If anyone has an old photo that they would like to run with this column bring it and the information into The Sentinel-News office or e-mail it to the writer at sharonw@sentinelnews.com. We are also looking for mystery photos. If you have a picture you can't identify, send it in and we'll ask our readers for help.

    10 years ago, 1998

  • About six months ago, when I decided to write a column for the anniversary of the 1929 Market Crash, I had no idea how timely it might be.

    Oct. 29, 1929. 79 years ago today, was engraved in the public mind as "Black Tuesday." The next day, The New York Times reported:

  • No need to wait on putting the roses to bed this year.

  • Whether real or fake, there's something magical about a Christmas tree, its lights and ornaments recalling joyful memories of past holidays.

    There are plenty of options to suit all tree-buyers, with cut Frasier firs and white pines, along with live Norway spruce, white pine, and even a few blue spruce ball and burlaps.

    Tough choices must be made.

  • The battalion sprang to life. This would be my first experience in battle, seeking out the Japanese on the island of Bougainville in the fall of 1943.

    Small patrols moved out and were soon swallowed by the dense jungle.  The battalion in seven files, each preceded by scouts and a team of machete-wielding Marines followed them.

  • Raymond Williams, a captain with Shelbyville Fire and Rescue, hurried in to the Amber Oaks Assisted Living Community on Wednesday. But there was no emergency.He was there to celebrate his great uncle George Stone's 98th birthday.

    Stone has lived in Shelby County all of his life. He grew up in Finchville, working on a tobacco farm with his dad. Compared to today's economic struggles, Williams said Stone has seen worse.

    "He [Stone] grew up in tough times," Williams said. "He went through the Great Depression."

  • Live or live-cut...that is the question for this year's holiday tradition of decorating an evergreen indoors for Christmas.

    You may think that you are being a better environmental steward by purchasing a live tree, but that's not necessarily true.

    Live-cut Christmas trees are a 100 percent renewable resource that is reusable, recyclable and biodegradable.  They are an American product, farms employ approximately 100,000 people each year; and one acre of planted Christmas trees provides the daily oxygen requirement for 18 people. 

  •  Thanks to the supporting fires provided by Marine aircraft, artillery, as well as the mortars and machine guns of my heavy weapons company, the First Battalion's Jungle Attack on Bougainville on Nov. 8, 1943 had been a success.

    Casualties had been few, and we were picked up by Naval landing craft and returned to the beachhead.

  • 2 1/2 out of 5 stars

    Twilight

    Rated PG-13

    Directed by Catherine Hardwicke

    Based on novel by: Stephenie Meyer

    Starring: Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson

     

    Judging by the $70.6M the film made in its crushing box office debut, it appears Twilight fans were out in full force over the weekend.

  •  In my last column, about the Great Depression, I wrote that, upon being commissioned in the regular U. S. Marine Corps in 1937, "My future was assured."

    I had in mind my economic future, for the seeds of war were already germinating in the Far East and in Europe.  Many of the 81 second lieutenants, who joined me for Marine officer training in Philadelphia that year would not survive World War II.

  • 10 years of the Depression

    This is the second in a series about life during and after the Great Depression.

    When my parents moved to Longview, Wash., in the autumn of 1933, I entered the University of Washington in Seattle.

    Quarterly tuition was only $25, and I was able to work for my room and board as a houseboy in a fraternity house. I lived in the basement with the other houseboy, Falconer Smith, who later earned a doctorate in biology and worked on the atomic bomb project.

  • I spoke with Jo-Ann van den Berg-Ohms from Van Engelen Bulb Company the other day. Her family has been in the Dutch bulb business for five generations, so I trust her advice when it comes to bulbs.

    She noted that bulbs are best planted once soil temperatures cool to about 55 degrees, so she tells people to wait and plant bulbs until we have had at least two weeks of sweater weather. If it is too cool outside without a jacket then it's just right for planting bulbs.

  • "Over the River and Into the Woods," which opens at the Shelby County Community Theatre on Friday, is the directorial debut of Shelby County native Mark Burks.

    The play is about a young man, Nickey, who is adored by his grandparents. When Nickey gets a promotion, the prospect of his moving ignites a series of hilarious events.

    Michael Catapano, a teen new to the Shelby County Theatre, plays the part of Nickey. He is from New York and has a "great Italian-New York accent," Burks said.

  • Disc Jockey Matt Holladay will host a Halloween costume party, All Hallows Rave, tonight at Gallrein Farms.

    About 300 people are expected to attend, starting at 7 p.m.

    Holladay, a native of New Albany, Ind., who moved to Shelbyville area about eight years, said he took his lifelong interest in music to the next level, becoming a DJ.

    "I've always had an interest in music," he said. "I fell in love with dance music and wanted to be able to make a career out of making people feel the way I did when I first heard dance music...alive and vibrant."

  • Two school bus drivers from Shelby County have been named the best in the state, and with the many narrow roads and hairpin turns they must negotiate, they don't take the honor lightly.

    The Kentucky Association of Pupil Transportation named Rev. Robert Marshall as the state's School Bus Driver of the Year and Phil Morgan as the state's Special Needs Driver of the Year.

    George Blakeman, transportation coordinator for the district, nominated them for the awards and said both men are great at what they do. They were chosen from similar nominations from all other districts.

  • Holly Husband looked up from making an online greeting card and smiled.

    "If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a greeting card means even more, especially to someone in the hospital," she said.

    Husband, public relations director at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, said the hospital's new online service to provide greeting cards has been very well received by patients and the public alike.

    The free service has been available since Sept. 1 and is accessible to everyone, Husband said.