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Features

  • 10 years of the Depression

    This is the second in a series about life during and after the Great Depression.

    When my parents moved to Longview, Wash., in the autumn of 1933, I entered the University of Washington in Seattle.

    Quarterly tuition was only $25, and I was able to work for my room and board as a houseboy in a fraternity house. I lived in the basement with the other houseboy, Falconer Smith, who later earned a doctorate in biology and worked on the atomic bomb project.

  • I spoke with Jo-Ann van den Berg-Ohms from Van Engelen Bulb Company the other day. Her family has been in the Dutch bulb business for five generations, so I trust her advice when it comes to bulbs.

    She noted that bulbs are best planted once soil temperatures cool to about 55 degrees, so she tells people to wait and plant bulbs until we have had at least two weeks of sweater weather. If it is too cool outside without a jacket then it's just right for planting bulbs.

  • "Over the River and Into the Woods," which opens at the Shelby County Community Theatre on Friday, is the directorial debut of Shelby County native Mark Burks.

    The play is about a young man, Nickey, who is adored by his grandparents. When Nickey gets a promotion, the prospect of his moving ignites a series of hilarious events.

    Michael Catapano, a teen new to the Shelby County Theatre, plays the part of Nickey. He is from New York and has a "great Italian-New York accent," Burks said.

  • Disc Jockey Matt Holladay will host a Halloween costume party, All Hallows Rave, tonight at Gallrein Farms.

    About 300 people are expected to attend, starting at 7 p.m.

    Holladay, a native of New Albany, Ind., who moved to Shelbyville area about eight years, said he took his lifelong interest in music to the next level, becoming a DJ.

    "I've always had an interest in music," he said. "I fell in love with dance music and wanted to be able to make a career out of making people feel the way I did when I first heard dance music...alive and vibrant."

  • Two school bus drivers from Shelby County have been named the best in the state, and with the many narrow roads and hairpin turns they must negotiate, they don't take the honor lightly.

    The Kentucky Association of Pupil Transportation named Rev. Robert Marshall as the state's School Bus Driver of the Year and Phil Morgan as the state's Special Needs Driver of the Year.

    George Blakeman, transportation coordinator for the district, nominated them for the awards and said both men are great at what they do. They were chosen from similar nominations from all other districts.

  • Holly Husband looked up from making an online greeting card and smiled.

    "If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a greeting card means even more, especially to someone in the hospital," she said.

    Husband, public relations director at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, said the hospital's new online service to provide greeting cards has been very well received by patients and the public alike.

    The free service has been available since Sept. 1 and is accessible to everyone, Husband said.

  • The Painted Stone Settlers put on their reenactment of the Long Run Massacre at Red Orchard Park last weekend.

    The reenactment had a record crowd on Saturday, and event organizers said the new location at Red Orchard was ideal.

    This annual, 2-day festival commemorates the pioneering days and two bloody conflicts that occurred between a group of settlers and a tribe of Native Americans here in Shelby County.

  • Steve Martin doesn't always have a good day.

    Sometimes he is bit by a dog or stranded in a snowstorm -- all while at work.

    He was recognized for his loyalty recently by his employer, the United States Post Office.

    Martin received the Million Mile Award at a ceremony Tuesday at the Shelbyville Post Office that was attended by his coworkers and District Manager Ann Wright.

  • Heather Wilson's living room is no longer just ugly.

    Instead, it has earned the dubious honor of being the ugliest room in Shelbyville.

    Wilson is ecstatic.

    For those who are not in the loop, Wilson is not ecstatic because she doesn't have to come up with ugly room jokes for the comedy circuit.

    No, she is happy because being the proud owner of the ugliest room in town entitles her to a makeover.

    Wilson was the top vote-getter in the Ugly Room Contest sponsored by the Shelbyville Merchants Association for Retail Trade (SMART).

  • "It was not easy seeing so much ugly," said the five judges, members of Shelbyville Merchants Association for Retail Trade (SMART), who picked the top three finalists for Shelbyville's Ugliest Room Makeover contest.

    Interior designer and owner of Surroundings Design Studio Debbie D'Angelo and her design team - Carol Bolton, manager of Tracy's Home Furnishings; Aimee McGruder, manager of Making Ends Meet; Liz Schreff, design consultant at W. J. Andriots and Kelly Craig, also from Tracy's - managed to sort through the 18 entrants to pick the top three.

  • Before Nintendo and Wii, farm kids played with pedal tractors.

    Before electricity, farmers lit their homes, their way to the barn or their trek into town at night with kerosene (which they called "coal oil") lamps. And before kerosene, they used whale oil or candles.

    Shelbyville couple Marvin Crouch and Deanie Logan, who both grew up on farms, collect a little bit of that farm nostalgia. Crouch has a collection of pedal tractors; Logan collects lanterns - kerosene, whale oil and candle. The lantern collection is a hobby that takes them back to their days on the farm.

  • "I'm so happy, I just can't tell you!" Viki Pidgeon exclaimed, pausing as she diced carrots and potatoes in her kitchen.

    "As soon as I found out, I told my husband, 'Barney, I'm getting an IPPY!' and he said, 'What's that?'"

    An "IPPY" is an Independent Publisher Book Award. The international book contest, which is in its 24th year, recognizes authors who are self-publishing. Entries average about 3,000 each year. Winners are chosen from several different categories. Pidgeon received her award in the cookbook category.

  • Sixth grade

  • Third grade

  • Wild horses couldn't keep the crowd away from Walnut Way farm's Equine Extravaganza on Saturday.

    The event, attended by about 100 people, was hosted by Marilyn Macfarlane, owner of Walnut Way.

    The crowd enjoyed a wide assortment of riders who treated the audience to everything from a horse and rider in full Arabian costume, to a tiny five-year-old who handled her horse like Annie Oakley.

  • Elizabeth Shemo was crowned Miss Shelby County Fair 2008 by Danielle Morris, the 2007 fair queen.

    Anna Cullen won the title of Miss Shelby County Teen 2008. She was crowned by Amye Drury, the 2007 pageant winner.

    Emily Marie Goins won the Miss Shelby County Pre-Teen Contest last Saturday. Krystyn Patricia Cole, right, was the runner up.

    Hunter Walford and Rikayla Fallen were named the winners of the Little Mister and Miss Shelby County Fair Monday.

  • The Miss Shelby County Pre-Teen Contest is 1 p.m. Saturday, June 14, at the Shelby County Fairgrounds.

    Contestants must be 8-years-old by July 1 and not have reached their 13th birthday by Oct. 31. Five finalists and a first runner-up and winner will be chosen from the standpoint of beauty, poise and personality.

  • Sixteen Shelby County girls will compete in the Miss Shelby County Teen pageant at the fair Tuesday. The winner will compete in the Miss Teen Kentucky County Fair pageant. The contestants, 13- to 16-years-old who all attend Shelby County High School, are judged on beauty, poise and personality.

  • The contestants must have reached her 16th birthday by Oct. 31 and shall not have reached her 22nd birthday by Oct. 31 of the year when the contest is held. Contestants will be judged from the standpoint of beauty, poise and personality.

    At 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, they will compete in shorts attire, followed by formal attire at 7:30 p.m. There is also a private showing in bathing attire for judges only.

  • The Kentucky Horseshoeing School in Mount Eden will be the subject of an episode of America's Heartland, a national PBS television program. The program was filmed at the school May 29.

    The half-hour show will feature the school sometime in August; the exact date has not yet been released.

    Steve Riggs, videographer for America's Heartland, said the program targets an urban audience to educate it on America's agriculture. Originally produced by KVIE, a local PBS affiliate in Southern California, the show is now in its eighth season.