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Features

  • Shortly after his marriage in 1765, Squire Boone accompanied his older brother Daniel and several others on a trip to hunt and explore new lands in Florida, which had become a  British at the end  of the French and Indian War.

  • School may be out for the summer, but that didn't stop some children from learning more about the Civil War this week.

    About 45 elementary-aged children attended the history camp Tuesday through Thursday, said Sharon Hackworth, an organizer of the event. This is the second year for the camp, which was  sponsored by the Shelby County Historical Society.

    Students saw and participated in reenactments of events from the 1860s, made crafts and interviewed people from the Civil War era, Hackworth said.

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    In mid-March, 1775, Richard Henderson, formerly a North Carolina judge, representing himself and the other partners of the newly formed Transylvania Company, signed a treaty with the Cherokees at Sycamore Shoals, near present-day Elizabethton, Tenn., giving his  company title of sorts to a large unoccupied territory north of the Tennessee River that presently constitutes the southern half of Kentucky.

  • With all their companions either dead, missing or having headed back home to North Carolina, Daniel Boone and his brother Squire found themselves alone in a vast wilderness, known to them as “Kentucke.”

    They hunted every day and spent the winter of 1769-70 in a “little cottage,” in the prose of author John Filson, which was probably, a lean-to, or a primitive log cabin.  On May 1, 1770, a year after the party’s departure from the Yadkin settlements in North C

  • For most kids there are few things more exciting than tearing open presents and seeing what surprises they receive.

    But the junior girl scouts of Troop 2146 know exactly what they want next year: Eiffel Towers and authentic Swiss chocolate.

    These six girls, along with their mothers, have been invited through the Kentuckiana Girl Scout Council to spend 10 days next summer sightseeing in London, Paris, and Switzerland. A 2-day extension to Rome is also a possibility.

  • Around $30,000 and two years later, the Shelby County Historical Society has completed and opened its Shelbyville Then and Now exhibit on the second floor of its building at 627 Main St.

    The exhibit is loaded with downtown Shelby-related artifacts, photographs and a video that depict a portion of the county’s history spanning from 1870 to the present.

    The first thing visitors will notice is a large rendering of early 1900s downtown Shelbyville.

  • Shelby County’s Sheila Fawbush was one of 20 women from four countries honored last week for their work with women's health education.

    Our Bodies, Ourselves, a Boston-based women's health organization, named Fawbush one of its Women's Health Heroes for 2009. She was among 100 nominees from 12 countries who were up for the award. Winners included authors, physicians, non-profit agency directors and teachers. She was the only Kentuckian to be honored.

    Fawbush, Shelby County’s Cooperative Extension Agent for Family and Consumer Sciences,

  • Who better to watch out for the future of the planet than those who are the future?

    When East Middle students from Candora McKinley’s seventh-grade science class went before the Shelbyville City Council Thursday, the mayor and council members listened attentively as the students shared their mission – part of Project Citizen – to battle littering in the city, particularly around bodies of water.

  • When the Shelby County Court House was built 95 years ago, a worker stashed a note in an empty whiskey bottle and hid it inside a stairwell. How do we know this?

    Because an employee at the Circuit Court Clerk's office found it by accident.

    "I was coming downstairs from the attic, and I noticed that the column post at the end of the staircase was crooked," Donna Cantrill said.

  • Do you love them or hate them? Do you prefer them stale or fresh?

    There are no mixed feelings about Peeps, those various-colored, sugarcoated marshmallows that arrive in homes everywhere at this time of year courtesy of the Easter Bunny or an outright purchase.

    They are more than the sugar, corn syrup and gelatin they contain. They are a fun tradition of Easter.

    Even children who don't like Peeps miss them from their Easter baskets. And Peeps sometimes can be found on tops of refrigerators as late as the Fourth of July.

  • Finchville Park is finally taking shape, and its new shelter and trail will be dedicated this weekend.

    The dedication starts at 12:30 p.m. Sunday with an old-fashioned potluck lunch. Shelbyville/Shelby County Parks and Recreation, which runs the park, will provide chicken and drinks and guests are asked to bring a dish. Those wanting to come should RSVP to the parks at 633-5059.

  • Heather Axline was "off the chart" when her bone density was checked at the Women's Wellness Affair Tuesday at Claudia Sanders Dinner House.

    Axline, a graduate of Shelby County High School and former girls basketball player, had her bone density checked by a heel scan done by employees of Jewish Hospital using a bone ultrasonometer. Her results showed outstanding bone density and strength.

  • Downtown Shelbyville is about to hear a new beat on a different street.

    On May 22, Sixth Street will close down for the year's second Sixth Street Live concert.

    "I think all of us sort of like the ambiance of Sixth Street because it has the sort of Americano look to it," said Tom Waggener, owner of Main Street Bikes.

    "It [Sixth Street] has little traffic anyway, so it's an easy place to close down and have a street concert."

  • Sixth Street will be closed tonight for a rockin’ good time.

    The second Sixth Street Live concert of the year will run free for all the public from 7 to around 10 p.m. and will be headlined by the Mitchell Toll band and Aaron Schupert.

    “Just come and enjoy the music,” The Mitchell Toll band member Brent Mathis said.

    Food vendors will include Bistro 535 and Earth's Promise Farm/ Certified Organic Pastured Poultry.

  • “There will be a lot going on,” Bagdad Baptist Pastor Kyle Wiley said of the 17th annual Bagdad Days, which run today and tomorrow in Bagdad.

    Most activities take place on the square in Bagdad, and some events are in the Bagdad Baptist Church.

    Chairperson Kelli Sheets said she plans for another successful event, in spite of forecasts for more rain. ”I’m praying for good weather,” Sheets said.

  • This is the last in a  series about Gen. David M. Shoup, who rose from heroism to serving the Marines at the highest level. Today: The Cuban Missile Crisis,

    When Gen. David M. Shoup took over as Commandant of the Marine Corps under President John F. Kennedy, the job initially had its moments for rounds of golf with the staff, which I enjoyed on several occasions.

  • The Rev. Ken Downey has come a long way, and he has a long way to go.

    Downey, 69, is on a cross-country trip commemorating the early circuit-riding preachers who went from town to town sharing the Gospel and preaching in homes and churches. Downey's vehicle is a single horsepower mode of transportation, a 14-year-old quarter horse named Pilgrim.

  • Gen. David M. Shoup served as Commandant of the U. S. Marine Corps (Commander of all Marines) from Jan. 1, 1960 until Dec. 31, 1963, a 4-year period of the Cold War not without its difficulties.

    Shoup, who was a surprising nominee for this important job, would find himself before the end of his tenure embroiled in one of the most worrisome military and political events that has confronted the United States: the Cuban Missile Crisis.

  • Local author Viki Pidgeon received a warm welcome at the Shelby County Library on Thursday night when she gave a talk on Ireland.

    Pidgeon is the recipient of an IPPY Award, from independent book publishers, for her cookbook, Ireland's Comfort Food, which she published in 2007.

    Pidgeon, who has dual citizenship, both American and Irish, brought along some Irish food, prepared using recipes, from her book, to  share with her audience.

    She also had copies of her book on hand, and it was easy to see why she earned her Ippy.

  • To say that the locally produced independent film "Clancy" did well in its opening weekend would be putting it lightly.

    "It did extremely well. We were having to turn people away Friday and Saturday night because it was packed," said Melanie Scott, assistant manager of the Apex Village 8 Theater in Louisville. "This has been one of our biggest openings in a long time."