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Features

  • Following the successful defense of Boonesborough during the Great Siege of 1778, Squire Boone, early in 1779, moved his family again to Fort Harrod.

    And in the spring of that year he took them in two large canoes down the

    Kentucky and Ohio rivers to the Falls of the Ohio.

  • The Shelby Saddlebreds Chapter of the Kentucky Junior Historical Society won 8 first-place awards at the KJHS State Convention on March 27th-28th. The annual convention held in Frankfort provides students twelve different categories to compete in: 2-D art, 3-D art, Documentary, Genealogy, Historical Exhibit, History Bowl, History Test, Heritage Performance, Impromptu Composition, Paper, Performance, and Photography. Shelby Saddlebreds had winners at every level of competition.

  • One in every 4,000 infants has an arterial ischemic stroke around the time of birth.

    Those who survive feel the effects all their lives. Depending on where the stroke occurs in the brain, the aftermath can vary. The survivors need strenuous therapy, often battle seizures, and struggle to develop on track with other children.

    But despite the struggles, they're survivors, and a handful of young survivors were front and center Saturday, leading the way at the Pediatric Stroke Awareness walk at Clear Creek Park.

  • Labor Day festivities this year will include two parades as well as a youth pageant.

    The pageant will be held at 6 p.m. at the Stratton Center on Monday and is open to ages 1 through 18.

    The parade in Waddy will begin at 10 a.m. and will run through downtown Waddy.

  • Daniel Boone and his garrison at Boonesborough, despite their resolve to defend to the death, agreed to negotiate with Chief Blackfish and his Shawnees, a force of more than 400, during their confrontation in the late summer of 1778.

  • Squire Boone, like other early settlers who arrived at Boonesborough in 1775, lost no time in searching for land.

    He scouted all around Central Kentucky along the trails he and Daniel had blazed during earlier trips to the new land, and he happened upon a tract of land in what is now Shelby County.

  • Harold Thom of Simpsonville learned his first guitar chords from Hank Williams Sr. when he was 14 years old.

    Since then, he has seen and done a lot in his music career, playing with some of the biggest names in folk and country music history with his band The Cumberlands.

    And though Thom said the group never had a top-five hit, they came close.

  • Harold Thom of Simpsonville learned his first guitar chords from Hank Williams Sr. when he was 14 years old.

    Since then, he has seen and done a lot in his music career, playing with some of the biggest names in folk and country music history with his band The Cumberlands.

    And though Thom said the group never had a top-five hit, they came close.

  • Debbie Tapp of Shelbyville said the first time she saw Michael Jackson was on The Ed Sullivan Show when she was 7 years old.

    Now Tapp and other Shelby County residents are dealing with the death of the “King of Pop” on Thursday.

    “His music blessed my spirit a lot when he got down to the sensitive side,” Tapp said. “He's 'gone too soon.' ”

  • Hoedown [hoh-doun]: -- noun

    1. a community dancing party typically featuring folk and square dances accompanied by lively hillbilly tunes played on the fiddle.

    You know summer time is approaching when people start dancing and fish start frying in Shelbyville.

    Over at Red Orchard Park, everybody is invited to put on their dancing shoes and attend the Red Orchard Hoedown Barn on Saturday from 8-11 p.m.

  • Introduction

    Squire Boone is well remembered for his establishment of the first settlement in Shelby County, known as “The Painted Stone Station.”

  • Shortly after his marriage in 1765, Squire Boone accompanied his older brother Daniel and several others on a trip to hunt and explore new lands in Florida, which had become a  British at the end  of the French and Indian War.

  • School may be out for the summer, but that didn't stop some children from learning more about the Civil War this week.

    About 45 elementary-aged children attended the history camp Tuesday through Thursday, said Sharon Hackworth, an organizer of the event. This is the second year for the camp, which was  sponsored by the Shelby County Historical Society.

    Students saw and participated in reenactments of events from the 1860s, made crafts and interviewed people from the Civil War era, Hackworth said.

  •  

    In mid-March, 1775, Richard Henderson, formerly a North Carolina judge, representing himself and the other partners of the newly formed Transylvania Company, signed a treaty with the Cherokees at Sycamore Shoals, near present-day Elizabethton, Tenn., giving his  company title of sorts to a large unoccupied territory north of the Tennessee River that presently constitutes the southern half of Kentucky.

  • With all their companions either dead, missing or having headed back home to North Carolina, Daniel Boone and his brother Squire found themselves alone in a vast wilderness, known to them as “Kentucke.”

    They hunted every day and spent the winter of 1769-70 in a “little cottage,” in the prose of author John Filson, which was probably, a lean-to, or a primitive log cabin.  On May 1, 1770, a year after the party’s departure from the Yadkin settlements in North C

  • For most kids there are few things more exciting than tearing open presents and seeing what surprises they receive.

    But the junior girl scouts of Troop 2146 know exactly what they want next year: Eiffel Towers and authentic Swiss chocolate.

    These six girls, along with their mothers, have been invited through the Kentuckiana Girl Scout Council to spend 10 days next summer sightseeing in London, Paris, and Switzerland. A 2-day extension to Rome is also a possibility.

  • Around $30,000 and two years later, the Shelby County Historical Society has completed and opened its Shelbyville Then and Now exhibit on the second floor of its building at 627 Main St.

    The exhibit is loaded with downtown Shelby-related artifacts, photographs and a video that depict a portion of the county’s history spanning from 1870 to the present.

    The first thing visitors will notice is a large rendering of early 1900s downtown Shelbyville.

  • Shelby County’s Sheila Fawbush was one of 20 women from four countries honored last week for their work with women's health education.

    Our Bodies, Ourselves, a Boston-based women's health organization, named Fawbush one of its Women's Health Heroes for 2009. She was among 100 nominees from 12 countries who were up for the award. Winners included authors, physicians, non-profit agency directors and teachers. She was the only Kentuckian to be honored.

    Fawbush, Shelby County’s Cooperative Extension Agent for Family and Consumer Sciences,

  • Who better to watch out for the future of the planet than those who are the future?

    When East Middle students from Candora McKinley’s seventh-grade science class went before the Shelbyville City Council Thursday, the mayor and council members listened attentively as the students shared their mission – part of Project Citizen – to battle littering in the city, particularly around bodies of water.

  • When the Shelby County Court House was built 95 years ago, a worker stashed a note in an empty whiskey bottle and hid it inside a stairwell. How do we know this?

    Because an employee at the Circuit Court Clerk's office found it by accident.

    "I was coming downstairs from the attic, and I noticed that the column post at the end of the staircase was crooked," Donna Cantrill said.