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Features

  • Like other customers at McDonald's restaurant at Governor's Square on Wednesday, Sam Neace was just passing through.

    "I just stopped in to get a bite of breakfast on my way to Chicago," he said, taking a last sip of coffee before hitting the road again.

  • A Loving Choice Pregnancy Resource Center's annual fall banquet was an evening of inspiration and giving, plus beautiful music and -- yes -- fried chicken.

    The event was held at Claudia Sanders Dinner House on Thursday evening.  Guests scanned tables and placed their bids on 74 silent-auction items. There were karate classes and massages, Dairy Queen cakes and a Christmas wreath.

  • Magistrate Betty Curtsinger is very excited about Clay Village’s first festival ever, coming up this Friday and Saturday.

    “I have pushed for this for the last 15 years,” she said. “The people here have worked very hard for this, and I’m so proud of them,” she said of her friends and neighbors.

    The Clay Village October Fest will kick off at 5 p.m. Friday with several bands, followed by a pig roast at 5:30 at the former Henry Clay School.

  • Louisville musician Patrick Henry Hughes, whose battles in life have inspired many, will be the guest speaker for A Loving Choice Pregnancy Resource Center's annual benefit banquet at the Claudia Sanders Dinner House on Thursday night.

    Hughes’ story is one of success in the face of overwhelming obstacles, one that has drawn national attention.

    Now a senior at the University of Louisville, he was born without eyes and without the ability to straighten his arms or legs.

  • Several thousand cyclists will ride through Shelby County this weekend, braving a strong chance of rain, wipeouts and enough flying insects to make them "look like the grill of a Mack truck," as rider Dan Mutterer put it.

    Mutterer is one of several Shelby County residents participating in The Ride to Conquer Cancer benefiting the Norton Cancer Institute. The Ride is a two-day, 150-mile journey from Louisville to Lexington and back.

  • If you’ve ever wondered why so many people spoil their children, it’s simple.  They get two big payoffs.

    First, the obvious: it’s easier just to get through the moment by indulging children’s demands, rather than stopping to teach them a lesson. And the more subtle reason is that by living for and through the child, they can avoid all their own feelings, issues and responsibilities. It’s like a drug—a pain-killing escape from reality.

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    Too many cooks sure didn't spoil the broth Monday night, with delicious food, sparkling spirits, a great jazz band, door prizes and even cornhole.

    Add to that a thoroughly mellow crowd, and you have the makings a great evening.

  • After a hiatus of more than 15 years, Cropper Day is Saturday in downtown Cropper in northeast Shelby County.

    The Cropper Ruritan Club, with help from other individuals and groups, has revived the event to promote interest in the small, rural community.

    The day kicks off with yard-sale booths opening 9 a.m. A Pie in the Face fundraiser contest will be all day. Jars for donations are available for community members Gene Witt, Don Taylor and the Rev. Jim Cavender.

  • No settled station was more exposed to Indian attack in the late summer of 1781 than Squire Boone’s Painted Stone Station. It had lost several of its defenders in recent harassing attacks, and venturing beyond its wall was a hazardous undertaking.

  • Early Saturday morning, members of a local church will convene for what would seem an ordinary weekend project to help a member of the community.

    When this group departs from a house just east of Shelbyville later that day, a young man who has mobility problems will find it much easier to get in and out of his home.

    But the project won’t stop there.

  • Norris Beckley wants to clean up the streets of Shelbyville. To start, he needs help cleaning up the old Shelby County Community Center gym.

    It’s there, at 121 Martin Luther King Jr. Street in the community of Martinsville, that he hopes to establish Stepping Stone Youth Enrichment Inc., a program he created earlier this summer to improve the lives of underprivileged kids.

  • Once again, the Shelbyville Horse Show Jubilee and AT&T are sponsoring a youth art contest open to students in the region from kindergarten through grade 12.

    Entries are already stacking up in the offices of the Shelby Development Corporation, but Executive Director Eilene Collins said there is room for more.

    The show has two-dimensional categories for all grades and three-dimensional categories for middle and high school students. Participants may enter one item per category.

  • Following the successful defense of Boonesborough during the Great Siege of 1778, Squire Boone, early in 1779, moved his family again to Fort Harrod.

    And in the spring of that year he took them in two large canoes down the

    Kentucky and Ohio rivers to the Falls of the Ohio.

  • The Shelby Saddlebreds Chapter of the Kentucky Junior Historical Society won 8 first-place awards at the KJHS State Convention on March 27th-28th. The annual convention held in Frankfort provides students twelve different categories to compete in: 2-D art, 3-D art, Documentary, Genealogy, Historical Exhibit, History Bowl, History Test, Heritage Performance, Impromptu Composition, Paper, Performance, and Photography. Shelby Saddlebreds had winners at every level of competition.

  • One in every 4,000 infants has an arterial ischemic stroke around the time of birth.

    Those who survive feel the effects all their lives. Depending on where the stroke occurs in the brain, the aftermath can vary. The survivors need strenuous therapy, often battle seizures, and struggle to develop on track with other children.

    But despite the struggles, they're survivors, and a handful of young survivors were front and center Saturday, leading the way at the Pediatric Stroke Awareness walk at Clear Creek Park.

  • Labor Day festivities this year will include two parades as well as a youth pageant.

    The pageant will be held at 6 p.m. at the Stratton Center on Monday and is open to ages 1 through 18.

    The parade in Waddy will begin at 10 a.m. and will run through downtown Waddy.

  • Daniel Boone and his garrison at Boonesborough, despite their resolve to defend to the death, agreed to negotiate with Chief Blackfish and his Shawnees, a force of more than 400, during their confrontation in the late summer of 1778.

  • Squire Boone, like other early settlers who arrived at Boonesborough in 1775, lost no time in searching for land.

    He scouted all around Central Kentucky along the trails he and Daniel had blazed during earlier trips to the new land, and he happened upon a tract of land in what is now Shelby County.

  • Harold Thom of Simpsonville learned his first guitar chords from Hank Williams Sr. when he was 14 years old.

    Since then, he has seen and done a lot in his music career, playing with some of the biggest names in folk and country music history with his band The Cumberlands.

    And though Thom said the group never had a top-five hit, they came close.

  • Harold Thom of Simpsonville learned his first guitar chords from Hank Williams Sr. when he was 14 years old.

    Since then, he has seen and done a lot in his music career, playing with some of the biggest names in folk and country music history with his band The Cumberlands.

    And though Thom said the group never had a top-five hit, they came close.