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Features

  • Little Lynwood was only 6 years old the first time he said he saw a ghost.

    He said he remembered that it was right around midnight and that it came to stand next to the bed he was sleeping in with his father.

    What did he do?

    He dived under the covers, of course.

  • John Clayton could not have painted a better picture for the life he leads.

    “I wake up every day to painting and music,” he said. “It’s a wonderful life.”

    Clayton, 80, has been working with both for the better part of 60 years.

    His studies in art have taken him to the University of Kentucky, Western Kentucky University and the Chicago Art Institute.

  • Remember when leaving your feet hanging off the bed was bait to the monster beneath it?

    Watching Paranormal Activity will bring back those childhood fears and remind you that just because you can't see anything lurking in the dark, doesn't mean something is not there.

    Paranormal Activity is No. 1 at the box office, filmed with nothing more than the Blair Witch-esque, singlehand-held camera technique, which is effective because of how limited it is.

  • On Sept. 17, 1781, four days after the Long Run Massacre and three days after Floyd’s Defeat, Squire Boone and his family and that of the widow Hinton, were accompanied to Linn’s Station by the large body of militia that had come to their rescue.

  • Through reading some good fiction or studying history, going to school can sometimes lead the mind to some faraway places.

    And with a little coaxing by your parents, sometimes the body gets to go, too.

    Meet Nick Tournaud -- a 2007 Shelby County High School graduate and junior biology major at Bellarmine University, though you won’t find him in the school’s halls at the moment.

  • Sure, Paula Sparrow’s book is filled with fascinating facts about chimpanzees, surprising specifics about kangaroos and pleasant pictures of pooches – and even portraits of pigs.

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    Scents of turkey and stuffing drifted from the Godow kitchen as Levi, 12, chased Lee-Lee, 7, and Olivia, 6, out the front door and onto the porch where, Heidi, 14, lounged on the porch swing.

    Their mother, Ashley, took in the children’s squeals and looked about her new home with amazement. The family moved into their Habitat for Humanity house on Jail Hill Road in Shelbyville on Sept. 2, but Ashley Godow said she still finds it hard to believe.

    “Everybody just came together to make something beautiful and affordable,” she said.

  • The women in the Ballard family are wild about horses, and they all have their tales to tell. The men are another story.

    Matthew, 11, recalled an incident that didn't bolster his enthusiasm for riding.

    "I had absolutely no experience and I was trying to drive the horse - I mean to stir it - and the horse went too far to one side going through the gate, and I fell off," he said. "I've kind of gotten a little more nervous around horses since that happened," he added.

    Recalling the experience, his sister, McKenzie, 13, giggled.

  •  When I was a boy, for as long as I could recall, I wanted a horse.

  • As soon as the survivors of the Long Run Massacre started to drift into Linn Station, Col. John Floyd, as County Lieutenant charged with the defense of Jefferson County and command of its militia, gathered what men he could from his station, in present-day St. Matthews, and the nearby stations.

  • Like other customers at McDonald's restaurant at Governor's Square on Wednesday, Sam Neace was just passing through.

    "I just stopped in to get a bite of breakfast on my way to Chicago," he said, taking a last sip of coffee before hitting the road again.

  • A Loving Choice Pregnancy Resource Center's annual fall banquet was an evening of inspiration and giving, plus beautiful music and -- yes -- fried chicken.

    The event was held at Claudia Sanders Dinner House on Thursday evening.  Guests scanned tables and placed their bids on 74 silent-auction items. There were karate classes and massages, Dairy Queen cakes and a Christmas wreath.

  • Magistrate Betty Curtsinger is very excited about Clay Village’s first festival ever, coming up this Friday and Saturday.

    “I have pushed for this for the last 15 years,” she said. “The people here have worked very hard for this, and I’m so proud of them,” she said of her friends and neighbors.

    The Clay Village October Fest will kick off at 5 p.m. Friday with several bands, followed by a pig roast at 5:30 at the former Henry Clay School.

  • Louisville musician Patrick Henry Hughes, whose battles in life have inspired many, will be the guest speaker for A Loving Choice Pregnancy Resource Center's annual benefit banquet at the Claudia Sanders Dinner House on Thursday night.

    Hughes’ story is one of success in the face of overwhelming obstacles, one that has drawn national attention.

    Now a senior at the University of Louisville, he was born without eyes and without the ability to straighten his arms or legs.

  • Several thousand cyclists will ride through Shelby County this weekend, braving a strong chance of rain, wipeouts and enough flying insects to make them "look like the grill of a Mack truck," as rider Dan Mutterer put it.

    Mutterer is one of several Shelby County residents participating in The Ride to Conquer Cancer benefiting the Norton Cancer Institute. The Ride is a two-day, 150-mile journey from Louisville to Lexington and back.

  • If you’ve ever wondered why so many people spoil their children, it’s simple.  They get two big payoffs.

    First, the obvious: it’s easier just to get through the moment by indulging children’s demands, rather than stopping to teach them a lesson. And the more subtle reason is that by living for and through the child, they can avoid all their own feelings, issues and responsibilities. It’s like a drug—a pain-killing escape from reality.

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    Too many cooks sure didn't spoil the broth Monday night, with delicious food, sparkling spirits, a great jazz band, door prizes and even cornhole.

    Add to that a thoroughly mellow crowd, and you have the makings a great evening.

  • After a hiatus of more than 15 years, Cropper Day is Saturday in downtown Cropper in northeast Shelby County.

    The Cropper Ruritan Club, with help from other individuals and groups, has revived the event to promote interest in the small, rural community.

    The day kicks off with yard-sale booths opening 9 a.m. A Pie in the Face fundraiser contest will be all day. Jars for donations are available for community members Gene Witt, Don Taylor and the Rev. Jim Cavender.

  • No settled station was more exposed to Indian attack in the late summer of 1781 than Squire Boone’s Painted Stone Station. It had lost several of its defenders in recent harassing attacks, and venturing beyond its wall was a hazardous undertaking.