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Features

  • It started as a little known play about an elderly white woman and her black chauffer and ended as blockbuster that garnered a Pulitzer Prize and the Best Film of 1990. And now, a new drama from the playwright who authored Driving Miss Daisy is coming to Shelby County.

  • The Shelby County Community Theatre (SCCT) is taking a one-act play to the Kentucky Theatre Association’s Community Theatre Festival – one of only four community theaters competing for Best Play at the festival.

  • Actors from Shelby County Community Theatre took first runner-up for Best Play at the Kentucky Theatre Association’s Community Theatre Festival on Saturday – one of three prizes overall – and earned a trip next spring to the Southeastern Theatre Conference (SETC), the region’s largest theater event.

  •  “He was involved in a number of difficulties by locating land for other men and giving bonds to make titles to the same losing the land by better claims he had but little satisfaction and peace in his later days but moved from place to place.”

    -- Daniel Boone Bryan (1758-1845) of Lexington, Squire Boone’s nephew, in a letter to historian Lyman Draper in 1843 about his uncle Squire.

  • Some pretty “Big Love” is coming to Shelby County High School this Friday and Saturday, when the theater department presents Charles Mee’s Big Love, an update on one of the oldest plays ever known, The Suppliant Women by Aeschylus.

  • Finchville resident and moviemaker Jefferson Moore has noticed that Christmas is becoming more censored each year.

    “We’re seeing Christmas slip each year. PC [politically correct] police are more ridiculous every year,” he said, referring to those who determine when and how others are allowed decorate, or even whether they’re able to say “Merry Christmas.”

  • Antiques For You recently celebrated its 20 years in business at 528 Main St. in downtown Shelbyville. But the building has been celebrating birthdays since as far back as the 1800s, and if you've been inside, you might get that tingling feeling that some of the past partygoers are still around.

  • The day that I saw the ghost dog began just like any another day.

    Let me say first that I have never entirely believed in ghosts. I have always conceded their possible existence, because no reasonable person can say they do not exist, that is, until we get to the Other Side and can see for ourselves.

    Such was my attitude that bright, sunny July day 15 years ago. We were having a birthday party in the back yard for my brother, and I had to go in the house. The screen door was sprung and as a result was slightly ajar.

  • I’m a realist. Most of the time when I hear ghost stories and think that people are either flat out lying or they’re just misinformed.

    I believe there’s a reasonable explanation for just about everything. Having said that, I have had one creepy experience that I’m still scratching my head over, and to this day I can’t tell it without getting goose bumps.

    Eight years ago I was at my parents’ house with some friends and family, singing karaoke in the sunroom and enjoying a summer day.

  • Little Lynwood was only 6 years old the first time he said he saw a ghost.

    He said he remembered that it was right around midnight and that it came to stand next to the bed he was sleeping in with his father.

    What did he do?

    He dived under the covers, of course.

  • John Clayton could not have painted a better picture for the life he leads.

    “I wake up every day to painting and music,” he said. “It’s a wonderful life.”

    Clayton, 80, has been working with both for the better part of 60 years.

    His studies in art have taken him to the University of Kentucky, Western Kentucky University and the Chicago Art Institute.

  • Remember when leaving your feet hanging off the bed was bait to the monster beneath it?

    Watching Paranormal Activity will bring back those childhood fears and remind you that just because you can't see anything lurking in the dark, doesn't mean something is not there.

    Paranormal Activity is No. 1 at the box office, filmed with nothing more than the Blair Witch-esque, singlehand-held camera technique, which is effective because of how limited it is.

  • On Sept. 17, 1781, four days after the Long Run Massacre and three days after Floyd’s Defeat, Squire Boone and his family and that of the widow Hinton, were accompanied to Linn’s Station by the large body of militia that had come to their rescue.

  • Through reading some good fiction or studying history, going to school can sometimes lead the mind to some faraway places.

    And with a little coaxing by your parents, sometimes the body gets to go, too.

    Meet Nick Tournaud -- a 2007 Shelby County High School graduate and junior biology major at Bellarmine University, though you won’t find him in the school’s halls at the moment.

  • Sure, Paula Sparrow’s book is filled with fascinating facts about chimpanzees, surprising specifics about kangaroos and pleasant pictures of pooches – and even portraits of pigs.

  •  

    Scents of turkey and stuffing drifted from the Godow kitchen as Levi, 12, chased Lee-Lee, 7, and Olivia, 6, out the front door and onto the porch where, Heidi, 14, lounged on the porch swing.

    Their mother, Ashley, took in the children’s squeals and looked about her new home with amazement. The family moved into their Habitat for Humanity house on Jail Hill Road in Shelbyville on Sept. 2, but Ashley Godow said she still finds it hard to believe.

    “Everybody just came together to make something beautiful and affordable,” she said.

  • The women in the Ballard family are wild about horses, and they all have their tales to tell. The men are another story.

    Matthew, 11, recalled an incident that didn't bolster his enthusiasm for riding.

    "I had absolutely no experience and I was trying to drive the horse - I mean to stir it - and the horse went too far to one side going through the gate, and I fell off," he said. "I've kind of gotten a little more nervous around horses since that happened," he added.

    Recalling the experience, his sister, McKenzie, 13, giggled.

  •  When I was a boy, for as long as I could recall, I wanted a horse.

  • As soon as the survivors of the Long Run Massacre started to drift into Linn Station, Col. John Floyd, as County Lieutenant charged with the defense of Jefferson County and command of its militia, gathered what men he could from his station, in present-day St. Matthews, and the nearby stations.