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Features

  • Veteran Shelbyville attorney Darby L. Smith has filed to make another run for District Judge Division III, which serves Shelby, Anderson and Spencer counties.

    Smith, 38, lost this race in 2006 to Donna Dutton, who had filed for re-election.

    In that race, Smith finished third in the primary election, about 2,000 votes behind winner David Nutgrass. Dutton, who finished second, overtook Nutgrass in the general election.

  • Emphasizing her record of tough penalties and case efficiency, Judge Donna Dutton is running for a second 4-year term in the 53rd Judicial District's Div. II courtroom. "I love what I do," she said.

  • District Court Judge Linda Armstrong, on the bench since 1998, wants to serve another term.

    Armstrong, who serves Shelby, Anderson and Spencer counties in Division 1 of the 53rd Judicial District, so far is unopposed for re-election in November.

  • As a resident and business owner of downtown Shelbyville, Robert Burry has his finger on the pulse of the city.

    Burry moved to Shelbyville 35 years ago, but it wasn’t until the last year that he became completely invested in the city.

    “I feel like I was brought here to make a difference, and I could not be effective one building at a time. Those were my words a year ago, to a mutual downtown focused friend, after I had begun the renovation process, investing my life into the buildings at 401-405 6th Street, where I live and work,” he said.

  • Frank Page said he decided it’s time for him to give a little back.

    “Shelbyville has been very, very good to me,” he said. “I always felt that if I had the chance, my duty would be to give something back. City council is something I’ve always wanted to do.”

    Page, a Republican, has lived in Shelbyville for most of his life, graduating from Shelby County High in 1984 and then Brescia College in 1989. He has helped serve the community in a number of ways, from committees to campaigns.

  • OWENSBORO – An official with the Daviess County Democratic Party filed papers to run for the 2nd District congressional seat now held by U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie.

    Ed Marksberry filed his paperwork at the secretary of state's office in Frankfort. The 2nd District sprawls from Owensboro to the outskirts of Louisville, including Shelby County.

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE – It's a matter that government can do better; it's a matter that government must do better.

    With that in mind, John Spainhour has jumped into the ring as a candidate for the 20th District state senate seat. The position is open at year's end as incumbent Gary Tapp opted to not run for re-election.

  • After sitting on the Shelbyville City Council for four years in the 1980s, Norris Beckley is looking to return.

    In a written release, Beckley said he’s excited about a possible return and noted his main goal would be to help bring good paying jobs to the city.

  • After spending two terms on Shelbyville’s City Council, there is still more Shane Suttor said he would like to accomplish.

    Suttor filed to run for his third term and said he hopes to help the city maintain its fiscal responsibility.

    “We need to continue to control our costs,” he said. “We’ve done a good job keeping taxes low and maintaining or improving our services to the community.”

    Suttor, a Democrat, noted the hiring of a full-time city engineer as one way he and the council have made strong financial decisions.

  • State Sen. Gary Tapp said Tuesday he would not be a candidate for re-election when his term expires in 2010.

    “I've been there 12 years, and that's pretty much enough,” Tapp said. “I want to spend more time with my business and with my family.”

  • At a forum with the Shelby County Republican Party on Thursday night, state Senate candidate Paul Hornback was the guest speaker, and the subject of marijuana came up.

    One questioner wanted to know if Hornback favored legalizing marijuana.

    "I am against it," he said, adding that he did not think it would possible to keep track of where it would be grown and how it would be used. He said that marijuana grows all around the county on the farms of unsuspecting farmers.

  • “Your Country is infested with hostile Indians and both you and Nicholas are liable to be taken off any day, . . . “

    Captain William Meriwether wrote this to his son, William, May 27, 1786.

  • George Best said he liked his first turn on the Shelbyville City Council so much he’s decided to run again.

    Best filed his papers to run for a second term this year, and he’s hoping to help lead the city into the new decade.

    Best said, like all cities, finding revenue will be key.

    “How do we get more revenue without increasing taxes?” he asked. “And how do we increase our services with out raising taxes? Those are the biggest questions we’ll face. There are several ways it can be done.”

  • Incumbent Shelby County Magistrate Betty Curtsinger has announced that she will be seeking a fourth term as a Shelby County 5th District magistrate.  “With the overwhelming urging of citizens residing in the 5th District, and my passion for serving the people of Shelby County, I will seek a fourth term as a member of the Shelby County Fiscal Court,” Curtsinger said. Curtsinger, a Democrat, said she is proud of the many undertakings that she and the Fiscal Court have collectively been able to accomplish by working for the betterment of Shelby Cou

  • Former Shelbyville Police Chief Stewart Shirley has filed to run as a Republican candidate for Shelby County Sheriff.

    Sheriff Mike Armstrong, a Democrat, has filed to run for re-election.

  • We have explored the life of Squire Boone, brother of Daniel and one of the original settlers of what today is Shelby County. We have followed him from North Carolina, across the state and into Indiana, where he died.

    To understand that life, we have to decipher his legacy, one mostly built on name – the Boone name and the landmark he created for his land holdings in what would become Shelby County, Painted Stone.

  • Having been born and raised in Shelbyville, city council member Alan Matthews has seen the city grow.

    He attended Shelbyville High School and has seen the small town expand past its old borders of Main and Washington streets.

    Now, as he runs for his fifth term on city council, he wants to remain a vital part of the city’s decision making.

  • Magistrate Tony Carriss said he remains excited about "all the good things that create Shelby County's uniqueness" as he files for his sixth term as magistrate.

    Among what he calls those special things are the great services that county government provides, he said.

    "We are very proud that each of our county services continues to improve each year while at the same time our tax rate for Shelby County government has continued to reduce.

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  • Mike Zoeller has spent the last six years on the Shelbyville City Council, and he's not ready to stop just yet.

    Zoeller, an assistant principal at Shelby County High School, has filed for a fourth term.

    He has been on the city's finance committee for his full tenure on the council and said he believes the city is in good shape.

    "The city of Shelbyville is in good financial shape because of proper planning and fiscal management," he said.

    Zoeller linked that success to the city's aggressive commitment to safety.