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Features

  • Novelist Sue Grafton certainly has her fans.

    Visit SueGrafton.com, and you’ll find 8,600 registered members who have posted 66,300 questions/answers to 3,883 different topics.

    There, they discuss such subtle nuances of where character Kinsey Millhone parks her car and if anyone has a good recipe for lemon bars.

  • With just 27 days left before the primary election on May 18, candidates will be out in full force spreading their messages to all that will listen.

    U.S. Senate candidates Rand Paul, Trey Grayson and Bill Johnson have stopped over in the county, and magisterial and constable races are becoming more active.

    But perhaps the biggest election facing voters in Shelby County will be for the District 20 State Senate seat being vacated by a retiring Gary Tapp (R-Shelbyville).

  • Nicholas Meriwether’s dispute with Daniel M'Cleland's about legal proceedings and land dealings in Shelby County did not end with Meriwether’s lengthy letter to the Kentucky Gazette.

    About two weeks later, M’Cleland got in his response.

    He wrote:

  • Internationally known mystery writer, Sue Grafton will speak at the Shelby County Public Library at 6 p.m. Thursday as part of the nationwide One Book, One Community program.

    Friends of the Library in Shelbyville have purchased 250 copies of J is for Judgment by Grafton to be distributed free to the community. They can be obtained by contacting the library, but only a few remain.

  • Isaac Shelby, the first governor of Kentucky and the namesake for Shelby County and its county seat, will be the subject of a one-man living history presentation Thursday.

    The Painted Stone Settlers, Inc. will host history interpreter Mel Hankla as he brings Shelby to life at 7 p.m. at the Stratton Center in Shelbyville.

    The show is free and open to the public.

  • On June 11, 1784, Nicholas Meriwether returned to Louisville with his family.  On Aug. 7 he wrote a lengthy and enlightening letter to his father-in-law, Captain Meriwether, describing in subdued terms his trip down the river:

    “An agreeable passage of seventeen days, the water being very low.”

    After discussing arrangements for the purchase of boats, he strongly recommended:

  • Tuesday was the last day to file for election for the May Primary, and numerous last-minute candidates filed their paperwork with the county clerk's office.

    A huge slate of candidates already has entered the race for the U.S. Senate seat held by retiring Republican Jim Bunning, and U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie (R-Bowling Green) picked up some competition for his seat in District 2, which includes Shelby County.

    Six Republicans and five Democrats will vie for Bunning’s slot, and Democrat Ed Marksberry of Owensboro has filed to face Guthrie.

  • Despite a sparse crowd, the candidates for the 20th District State Senate seat were ready and willing to go at the Tuesday's Kentucky Farm Bureau forum at the Stratton Center.

    All four candidates - Republicans David Glauber, Bullitt County, and Paul Hornback, Shelby County, and Democrats David Eaton, Shelby, and John Spainhour, Bullitt – turned out to define their positions on topics ranging from agriculture to education and from taxes to infrastructure.

  • The raw, powerful sound of Southern Rock pounds out from the metal barn about a half a mile off Eminence Pike.

    The music rips through the cold barn behind kerosene heaters that slowly warm the space that the band Cynthiana shares with several cars and trucks, an airplane and the rest of the junk that fills garages across America.

    In just a few months, the music has transformed the garage into a makeshift rehearsal place.

  • Everett Rogers is running for constable in Shelby County’s District 7.

    Rogers, a Democrat, is retired from the Kentucky Truck Plant Division of the Ford Motor Company.

    When asked why he was running for constable, he said, “My goal is to give back to the community by helping and serving the citizens of District 7.”

  • Hundreds of Republicans from extreme to moderate descended on Claudia Sanders Dinner House on Friday for the Shelby County Republican Party's Lincoln Day celebration and fundraiser.

    David Williams, president of the state Senate, was the keynote speaker, and he reminded the crowd not only of Lincoln's Kentucky roots but also of his message.

  • George Meriwether died on Feb. 4, 1782, near Brownsville, Pa., where he had settled for a few months while bringing his family to Louisville.

    The loss was felt by many, for George was a person of great promise, not yet 38, in the prime of his life.

    Initially uninformed of the nature of his death, I was left with a question as to whether or not he was killed by Indians, who were still a threat to travelers into Kentucky at that time.

  • Democrat Mike F. Taylor of Mulberry Pike in Pleasureville has filed to run for magistrate in District 4.

    Taylor, 55, has been a full-time farmer for 40 years and was an AI (artificial insemination) technician of cattle.

    He is from Bagdad and has lived on Mulberry Pike for 29 years.

    He has run for office twice before.

  • Ken Franks of Bagdad is running for magistrate in District 4, the seat being vacated by Cordy Armstrong, who is retiring.

    Franks, 47, is retired from a career in state government and now is working part-time at Clore-Argri-Co. on Eminence Pike.

    Franks never has run for office before, but said he felt the time was right to do so.

    "I have been in public service all my life, and it just seemed like a good time to do it," he said.

  • Passersby on Plainview Drive in Shelbyville have been doing a double take at seeing Christ in the front yard of the Horns’ residence. An extremely lifelike snow sculpture of Christ on the cross has been drawing a lot of attention. “It’s the talk of the neighborhood,” Ann Horn said. Incredibly, the “Snow Christ,” which is lifelike enough to give you chills, is mostly the work of two children.  Although Horn, who teaches art at Our Lady of Guadalupe in Simpsonville, helped, her son, John Paul Horn, 1

  • I could wish that you would patronize a petition to have the town on Conelleys Land [Falls of the Ohio] established & have it sent with a plan of the Town to the Assembly in May.

    Nicholas Meriwether’s brother George to George Rogers Clark, January 24, 1780.

  • Rommel Colson of Waddy is announcing that he will seek election to constable in the District 5 area of Shelby County.

    The boundary of District 5 includes west of the Franklin County line, east of Governor Square, north of I-64 and south of Benson Pike.

    "My ambition is to serve and help the people of District 5, and I will strive to make the constable's Office more visible and productive and provide the services that the citizens deserve in this area," he said.

  • Theater auditions

  •  Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet opens tonight at the Shelby County Community Theatre. It stars Kaitlin Erhard and Michael Sheehy in the title roles. The Sentinel-News asked Erhard and Sheehy to share more about their experiences and playing two such famous characters.

     

    Juliet: Kaitlin Erhard

    Age: 18

  • After regaining his seat on the Shelbyville City Council in the last election, Jon Swindler, who also served in 2004, has filed for re-election.

    A lifetime Shelbyville resident, Swindler said the city needs to be ready to grow.

    “I believe the city needs to be welcoming to any opportunity for job growth and do all it can to attract companies that provide good-paying jobs with clean industry,” he said.

    With the city in strong financial shape now, Swindler said it’s important that it remain stable for the citizens.