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  • During Any Number Can Die four ingenious murders take place in an island mansion as a pair of elderly detectives set to work on their first case.

    It’s a hilarious take-off on the Who Done It? Mystery plays of the late 1920s, complete with sliding panels, robed figures, the cryptic poem and the ever popular storm.

  • Political newcomer Ray Gunn is running for magistrate in District 4.

    Gunn, a Democrat and Vietnam veteran, is retired from the excavating business after 45 years, the last 30 of which he operated his own business, Ray Gunn Excavating, LLC.

  • Charles Lee Davis III is running for constable in Shelby County’s District 4.

    Davis, a Democrat, is a life-long resident of Shelby County, with a family that dates back five generations in the county.

  • The races are getting a little more urgent, and the candidates are reaching out to the voters.

    Signs are at intersections, and community fund-raisers become the modern-era stumps on which a candidate climbs to make his or her pitch to the voters.

    Take, for instance, a recent pork chop dinner held at the East 60 Fire Department, an event that resembled more a family reunion than a public forum for political candidates.

  • The Shelby County High School Choir will be performing its 2010 Pops Concert, “A Century of Music and Dance,”  at 5:30 and 8 p.m. May 6 at the high school auditorium. Tickets are $5 for adults, and $3 for students.

     

  •  Auditions set

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    ‘Any Number Can Die’ opens Friday

  • Another of the candidates for the U.S. Senate seat Jim Bunning is vacating came through Shelby County last week.

    Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson, a Republican, spoke Thursday night at the Stratton Center in a group of about 20 at a Republican gathering about his position on a variety of issues.

  • Novelist Sue Grafton certainly has her fans.

    Visit SueGrafton.com, and you’ll find 8,600 registered members who have posted 66,300 questions/answers to 3,883 different topics.

    There, they discuss such subtle nuances of where character Kinsey Millhone parks her car and if anyone has a good recipe for lemon bars.

  • With just 27 days left before the primary election on May 18, candidates will be out in full force spreading their messages to all that will listen.

    U.S. Senate candidates Rand Paul, Trey Grayson and Bill Johnson have stopped over in the county, and magisterial and constable races are becoming more active.

    But perhaps the biggest election facing voters in Shelby County will be for the District 20 State Senate seat being vacated by a retiring Gary Tapp (R-Shelbyville).

  • Nicholas Meriwether’s dispute with Daniel M'Cleland's about legal proceedings and land dealings in Shelby County did not end with Meriwether’s lengthy letter to the Kentucky Gazette.

    About two weeks later, M’Cleland got in his response.

    He wrote:

  • Internationally known mystery writer, Sue Grafton will speak at the Shelby County Public Library at 6 p.m. Thursday as part of the nationwide One Book, One Community program.

    Friends of the Library in Shelbyville have purchased 250 copies of J is for Judgment by Grafton to be distributed free to the community. They can be obtained by contacting the library, but only a few remain.

  • Isaac Shelby, the first governor of Kentucky and the namesake for Shelby County and its county seat, will be the subject of a one-man living history presentation Thursday.

    The Painted Stone Settlers, Inc. will host history interpreter Mel Hankla as he brings Shelby to life at 7 p.m. at the Stratton Center in Shelbyville.

    The show is free and open to the public.

  • On June 11, 1784, Nicholas Meriwether returned to Louisville with his family.  On Aug. 7 he wrote a lengthy and enlightening letter to his father-in-law, Captain Meriwether, describing in subdued terms his trip down the river:

    “An agreeable passage of seventeen days, the water being very low.”

    After discussing arrangements for the purchase of boats, he strongly recommended:

  • Tuesday was the last day to file for election for the May Primary, and numerous last-minute candidates filed their paperwork with the county clerk's office.

    A huge slate of candidates already has entered the race for the U.S. Senate seat held by retiring Republican Jim Bunning, and U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie (R-Bowling Green) picked up some competition for his seat in District 2, which includes Shelby County.

    Six Republicans and five Democrats will vie for Bunning’s slot, and Democrat Ed Marksberry of Owensboro has filed to face Guthrie.

  • Despite a sparse crowd, the candidates for the 20th District State Senate seat were ready and willing to go at the Tuesday's Kentucky Farm Bureau forum at the Stratton Center.

    All four candidates - Republicans David Glauber, Bullitt County, and Paul Hornback, Shelby County, and Democrats David Eaton, Shelby, and John Spainhour, Bullitt – turned out to define their positions on topics ranging from agriculture to education and from taxes to infrastructure.

  • The raw, powerful sound of Southern Rock pounds out from the metal barn about a half a mile off Eminence Pike.

    The music rips through the cold barn behind kerosene heaters that slowly warm the space that the band Cynthiana shares with several cars and trucks, an airplane and the rest of the junk that fills garages across America.

    In just a few months, the music has transformed the garage into a makeshift rehearsal place.

  • Everett Rogers is running for constable in Shelby County’s District 7.

    Rogers, a Democrat, is retired from the Kentucky Truck Plant Division of the Ford Motor Company.

    When asked why he was running for constable, he said, “My goal is to give back to the community by helping and serving the citizens of District 7.”

  • Hundreds of Republicans from extreme to moderate descended on Claudia Sanders Dinner House on Friday for the Shelby County Republican Party's Lincoln Day celebration and fundraiser.

    David Williams, president of the state Senate, was the keynote speaker, and he reminded the crowd not only of Lincoln's Kentucky roots but also of his message.