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Features

  • “It seems like only yesterday when she graduated from [Shelby County] high school, and now she’s living in Hollywood, within walking distance of the Walk of Fame.”

    Those are the words of Eve Lawson Lewis, the mother of Ruby Lewis, a member of the Class of 2003 who just finished up a national tour of the Broadway musical Greaselast year and has moved on from musical theater to television.

  • Lewis Burwell Puller, at 5 feet 8 inches and 144 pounds, was a little below average size of his time, but he stood out among his contemporaries because of his barrel chest.

    Even so, I still have difficulty referring to him by his nickname, “Chesty,” because when I first met him in 1937, he was called “Lewie,” although not by us second lieutenants, who were careful to address him quite formally as “Captain Puller!”

  • Annunciation
    Homebound or hospitalized? If you know of someone who wants to see a priest or needs communion, call the parish office at 633-1547. If you have thought of becoming Catholic or have questions about the Catholic Church, you are invited to come to RCIA. Contact Diana at 647-3499.

  • Have you ever heard the story of the man who threw a party and offered a million dollars or his daughter’s hand in marriage to the man who could successfully swim the length of his pool, which was filled with hungry sharks?

    Well, one guest made it, and when he climbed out, dripping, the man asked the guest what he wanted.

    “The only thing I want is to know who pushed me into the pool?” the man demanded.

  • During a month when we celebrate African-American history, many in Shelby County can look back at through their families and see the impact made by a former slave from Simpsonville – a story only a relative few even have heard.

    Elijah P. Marrs left his indentured life of the 1840s on Clark Station Road and fought his way to the classrooms not only as a student but as a teacher and an administrator who brought knowledge to those long denied the basic process of learning – and in the process created a legacy that too often goes unnoticed.

  • Allen Chapel United Methodist
    The church will worship its heritage at 3 p.m. Sunday. The theme is our heritage in Biblical times of our religion. More than 4,000 years of Biblical history will be told. The church is south of Finchville. St. John United Methodist will worship in music with the Shelby County choir at 6 p.m. Feb. 26 at 212 Martin Luther King St.

  • Allen Chapel United Methodist
    The church will worship its heritage at 3 p.m. Sunday. The theme is our heritage in Biblical times of our religion. More than 4,000 years of Biblical history will be told. The church is south of Finchville. St. John United Methodist will worship in music with the Shelby County choir at 6 p.m. Feb. 26 at 212 Martin Luther King St.

  • Hanna Evans lived for only six years, but her loving, generous spirit is about to immortalized at the hospital that treated her for a rare form of cancer.

    Her parents, Jennifer and Rob Evans of Simpsonville, have donated $1 million to the Kosair Children’s Hospital to create the Hanna Catherine Evans Bone Marrow Transplant Program, which will help provide care for child cancer patients.

    The dedication will take place at 1 p.m. Monday at the hospital in Louisville.

  • After 56 Valentine’s Days together, Fred and Geneva Ruble are still sweethearts.

    When they wed on July 23, 1955, they embarked on a love story that has never waned. “Freddie” and “Neva” (their nicknames for each other) have really lived up to their marriage vows, especially the part about “in sickness and in health,” said their daughter, Renee Ruble.

    “In more than 50 years of marriage, they have never been apart for more than three or four days,” she said.

  • It may not have been the cat’s meow, but it was close.

    Officials of animal rescue groups in Shelby County say they were very pleased with the turnout of their first joint fundraiser, a sold-out event at Claudia Sanders Dinner House on Saturday night.

    “We are thrilled with the turnout,” said Nancy Guilliom, Humane Society volunteer coordinator. “We have 410 here tonight [Saturday]. We couldn’t be more pleased.”

  • Annunciation

    Homebound or hospitalized? If you know of someone who wants to see a priest or needs communion, call the parish office at 633-1547. If you have thought of becoming Catholic or have questions about the Catholic Church, you are invited to come to RCIA. Contact Diana at 647-3499.

     

    Bagdad Baptist

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  • Chad Higgins begins his service as the minister of music for the New Mount Zion Baptist Church of Shelbyville.

    He has served in various capacities in music ministry leadership for many churches in this region. He is the music coordinator for the Midwest Region of the National Convention of Gospel Choirs and Choruses (aka, The Thomas Dorsey Convention).

  • Annunciation
    Homebound or hospitalized? If you know of someone who wants to see a priest or needs communion, call the parish office at 633-1547. If you have thought of becoming Catholic or have questions about the Catholic Church, you are invited to come to RCIA. Contact Diana at 647-3499.

  • A North Oldham High School student who tuned her musical skills in Shelby County earned a golden ticket to Hollywood by producers of American Idol.
    "It's my dream. I just really want it," 16-year-old Brandy Neelly said in her Idol post-audition interview, which is posted on YouTube.
    Neelly and her family were jumping for joy when they learned that she would move on in the competition.
    "What a moment," Neelly’s mother, Cheryl Case, said. "It was as much fun as it looks."

  • Last year nearly 1,500 Shelby County children were treated at Kosair Children’s Hospital in Louisville, the only medical facility in the state that specializes in treating children.
    Because of how that hospital benefits the community, a Shelby County charity has started an effort to raise funds for the hospital that has saved the lives of thousands of local children.
    The Tres Chic Executive Committee is hoping to raise $10,000 on Saturday at its second annual event at Claudia Sanders Dinner House.  

  • "We just sing and have a good time," Frances Fonza said.

    But you get the feeling there is much more to it than that.

    Throughout a practice Monday with the Shelby County Treble choir, an invitation and tryout group at Shelby County High School, Fonza is focused on the music.

    "I'm going to stop you eight thousand times, so be ready,” she said. “We're going to get this right."

  • He may be a former Army sergeant and commercial truck driver who enjoys reading history and epic fantasy, but when David Frankel decided to write a book, he penned a romance novel.
    But that makes some sense when you realize that Frankel, a resident of Shelbyville, is the romantic sort: After meeting his now-wife in an online dating site, their first date resulted in a proposal of marriage.
    That turned out OK. He is celebrating his fifth year of marriage with Jackie Peterson, formerly of Eminence.

  •  

    Officials at three local non-profit organizations in Shelby County are excited about some additional funding they received recently from Metro United Way.

    The Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency, Operation Care’s Mercy Medical Clinic and Centro Latino received $41,000 among them.