.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • After relocating to a new building several times the size of its former home, Operation Care will have a fundraiser this week to cover the costs of that move and continue serving the Shelby County community.

    Judy Roberts, executive director of Operation Care, said the new location on Main Street in Shelbyville allows her organization to expand all of its programs.

  • Using the Dewey Decimal System at the Shelby County Public Library won’t happen much anymore now that the library has upgraded to a new and more convenient online system.

    Customers now can submit an order online for a book at any time, and a library staff member will have it ready for pick up the following the morning, Library Director Pam Federspiel said.

    “The public wants more and more things they can do online,” she said. “It gives more functions for the public.”

  • My freshman year at the University of Washington (1933), I supported myself by washing dishes in a fraternity house, receiving meals and a bed in the basement, but no other wage.

    Following his election that year, Franklin Roosevelt established a number of “New Deal” programs in order to ease the disastrous effects of the Great Depression. One such program was the National Youth Administration, which provided work on campus part time at 50 cents an hour.

  • Lazy summer days, a tall glass of cold lemonade and a picnic in the park sounds pretty good after a cold, rainy spring.

    But that’s just the tip of the iceberg for summer fun in Shelby County.

    First off, there’s the county’s park system and all kinds of activities for kids and adults alike.

    Jeremiah Heath, director of the Family Activity Center at Clear Creek Park, laughed when asked what kinds of programs and activities were available this summer.

  • There was something for everyone at the Bagdad Days festival Friday and Saturday.

  • Maybe Mother Nature was in a good mood Saturday because of Shelby County’s Earth Day celebration at Red Orchard Park.

    Whatever the reason, the first day of sunshine in days was a welcome sight, both for visitors and for the dozens of people and organizations that had worked hard to make sure the event was a success, which all agreed that it was.

    Shelby County Parks Director Clay Cottongim said he was pleased with the weather and even more pleased with the turnout.

  • The Luci Center's indoor and outdoor riding rings are great places for the center to focus its therapeutic riding and hippotherapy services, but the center is looking for more.

    But this year the Luci Center is planning to add a sensory integration trail.

    The center, which opened in 1988, works with children and adults with disabilities through horse riding and related activities.

    As a member of the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association, the Luci Center uses several different techniques to help riders.

  • Mother Nature might have slowed him down, but she couldn't stop the Easter bunny on Saturday.

    As rain continued to drown the region this weekend, many egg hunts were canceled or moved inside.

    But it didn't stop the Finchville Ruritan Club from having its annual egg hunt around the old Finchville school.

    "My kids love it," Jeanine Barrett said. "They think it's more fun in the rain."

  • Before the first shots of the Civil War were fired 150 years ago - on April 12, 1861 - it was already clear that Kentucky would play an important role in shaping both the Confederate and Union sides.

    A border state like no other, Kentucky's legislature struggled to choose a side, finally settling with the Union, much to the delight of President Abraham Lincoln, a native.

  • Since the publication of – in both newspaper and book formats – my columns on Squire Boone, whose Painted Stone Station along Clear Creek was the forerunner of present-day Shelbyville, I have received additional information relating to his life and times.

    You may recall that, on Sept. 13, 1781, settlers fleeing Painted Stone for the relative safety of Linn’s Station were attached viciously by Indians in what has been described as “The Long Run Massacre.”

  • Richard Luebbert pauses as he considers how to describe his first book, just off the presses and already in a second printing:

    “Well, it’s about Jesus,” he says simply.

    The book is called, a little less simply, Jesus for the 21st Century, The Unified Gospel, which Luebbert describes as a “new look at the old, old story.”

    The book, which he will display at a signing April 21 at the Shelby County Public Library, is the combined gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John arranged in a new way

  • It may seem like an episode of The Amazing Raceevery time you step into Shelbyville's new Kroger Marketplace with its enormous size, new areas and international food flare giving it the feel of circumnavigating the globe.

    But on Wednesday it provided a home for CBS’ hit reality show.

    Hundreds lined up outside the store to get a chance to make a video with WLKY producers as an audition for the show from 6 to 8 p.m.

  • With all the calamity going on in Japan, one woman in Shelbyville wants to make a difference – if only she can get some help.

    Mallory Taylor said she saw the horrible destruction on television after an earthquake and tsunami destroyed coastal cities, killing thousands, and then unleashed the threat of nuclear contamination across the county.

    “I was crying and upset. It was terrible,” Taylor said. “I just wanted to do something.”

    And that’s what she set out to do – in any way that she could.

  • William E. Matthews, who has been in the publishing business in Shelbyville for decades, is joining forces with photographer Greg Biagi to produce a new photographic book that he hopes will bridge history for Shelby Countians.

    Matthews, who owns the publishing company Historic Kentucky, said that his company and Biagi, who owns Greg Biagi Photos, are producing a full-color, hardcover book with the working title of Shelby County Today.

  • Over the years there has been a great debate over organic versus non-organic foods.  Do you really need to go organic… or… is it just a waste of money?  
    The Environmental Working Group (www.ewg.org) is a nonprofit organization that advocates in Washington D.C. for policies that protect global and individual health. Among the many valuable services they provide is a shoppers' guide to pesticides in produce.

  • Picture a dark, theater-like room, loud rock music blaring, with huge video screens flashing bright images on the stage, and each one of the crowd of 700 young people wearing a headset glowing florescent green in the dark.
    Sound like a new take on an ultra modern 3-D movie?
    Try a high-tech version of  a birds and bees discussion with the emphasis on sexual abstinence targeted toward teens and young adults. 

  • I believe the No. 1 killer of mental and relational health is the refusal to go through the learning experience of emotional pain. And if the most costly discomfort we refuse is withdrawal pains from toxic chemicals, habits and relationships, I believe the next biggest mental health buzz kill is the ever so common refusal to forgive others and oneself.
    I just have to take a stab here at trying to reduce just a little bit this colossal waste of serenity.
    Forgiveness is a private act. It may never include an “I forgive you” talk.

  • When four former mayors of Shelbyville get together to talk about their heydays, there's bound to be some reminiscing, some joking and even some well-deserved boasting.

    There was all of that and more when Marshall Long, Neil Hackworth, Donald Cubert Sr. and David Eaton – men who bridged two decades at the helm of Shelby County’s  seat – gathered Thursday night as the “featured speakers” for a meeting of the Shelby County Historical Society.

  • Some eyes in Shelby County will be smiling Thursday when one of our own celebrates St. Patrick's Day, where most surely would guess is the best place to do so – Ireland.

    Stephen Fox, 23, says he has fallen in love with the Emerald Isle and its people in the two months that he has been in Dublin on an internship to complete his college credits at Eastern Kentucky University, where he is a senior, majoring in communication studies.

  • Captain Lewis B. “Chesty” Puller, USMC, whom I had first encountered as my instructor at Marine Corps Basic School in Philadelphia in 1937-38, had actively sought combat assignments. 

    In World War II and the Korean Conflict, he continued to advance in rank and to add three more awards of the coveted Navy Cross to the two he wore at that time.  He had been considered by all Marines to be the Corps’ greatest hero,

     Now, to his dismay, he had fought his last fight.  He was however to be caught up in other controversies.