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Features

  • When the aircraft carrier Wasp transited the Panama Canal in June 1942 to reinforce the Pacific Fleet and, at San Diego on June 25, I was detached as commanding officer of its Marine detachment.

    I had requested to remain on board, but my promotion to major was imminent, and I was needed at Camp Lejuene, N.C., where a new infantry regiment was being formed, the 21st Marines.

    Jack Quackenbush, my roommate at the University of Washington, went a separate course with the Hornet.

    Our paths didn’t cross again.

     

  • Operation Care raised more $15,302 for the company’s new building on Main Street with a fundraiser at Claudia Sanders Friday. Director Judy Roberts said they were hoping to make more money but attendance was down because of the Shelby County Fair and Father’s Day weekend.

  • Shelby County native Drew Howell put his pen to paper and churned out a “gripping tale of counterterrorism, covert intelligence, heroism, duty and betrayal” that is slowly working its way into bookstores and onto shelves.

    Expendable Assets is Howell’s first book but it certainly won’t be the last book, he said.

    "This story is not finished,” he said. "I'm starting to put together ideas all ready."

    And he has no shortage of sources for them.

  • James Bowman and Aaron DeFlippo from Kentucky Down Under, showed Children at the Library on Thursday afternoon, native Australian animals such as a lizard, jungle carpet snake, cocobarra bird and a kangaroo.

  • Men, in particular, skillfully evade the doctor and making moves toward good health until something bad happens, said Mitch McClain, a member of the organizing committee for the annual Men’s Health Fair.

    Jewish Hospital Shelbyville on Saturday host its Men’s Health Fair for the 11th consecutive year, offering screenings that included prostate exams, blood work, oral cancer screening and skin cancer screening.

  • Whether it’s the Defender of the Fatherland Day in Russia, Dia del Pare in Andorra, Festa del Papáin Italy or Ziua Tatalui in Romania, the world recognizes Father’s Day.

    You can celebrate it bundled up on Feb. 23 in Russia or as a rite of spring on May 8 in Tonga. Maybe you prefer our summer cookouts on the third Sunday in June (it’s the 19th this year) or would rather opt for a nice autumn day in Luxembourg on the first Sunday in October.

    But whatever the day, don’t forget your vader, pére, padre or pai.

  • A successful and joyous anniversary party last Saturday reminded a local artist how much people care for the arts in Shelbyville.

    Shelby Artists on Main co-founder Linda Powell said the “anniversary was a smash.”

    “The people in attendance seemed very pleased,” she said. Past supporters of the gallery who came were surprised by the obvious improvements.”

    About 75 people stopped by to celebrate the now nonprofit gallery’s anniversary, but Powell said there isn’t a tally yet on how many raffle tickets were sold.

  • After relocating to a new building several times the size of its former home, Operation Care will have a fundraiser this week to cover the costs of that move and continue serving the Shelby County community.

    Judy Roberts, executive director of Operation Care, said the new location on Main Street in Shelbyville allows her organization to expand all of its programs.

  • Using the Dewey Decimal System at the Shelby County Public Library won’t happen much anymore now that the library has upgraded to a new and more convenient online system.

    Customers now can submit an order online for a book at any time, and a library staff member will have it ready for pick up the following the morning, Library Director Pam Federspiel said.

    “The public wants more and more things they can do online,” she said. “It gives more functions for the public.”

  • My freshman year at the University of Washington (1933), I supported myself by washing dishes in a fraternity house, receiving meals and a bed in the basement, but no other wage.

    Following his election that year, Franklin Roosevelt established a number of “New Deal” programs in order to ease the disastrous effects of the Great Depression. One such program was the National Youth Administration, which provided work on campus part time at 50 cents an hour.

  • Lazy summer days, a tall glass of cold lemonade and a picnic in the park sounds pretty good after a cold, rainy spring.

    But that’s just the tip of the iceberg for summer fun in Shelby County.

    First off, there’s the county’s park system and all kinds of activities for kids and adults alike.

    Jeremiah Heath, director of the Family Activity Center at Clear Creek Park, laughed when asked what kinds of programs and activities were available this summer.

  • There was something for everyone at the Bagdad Days festival Friday and Saturday.

  • Maybe Mother Nature was in a good mood Saturday because of Shelby County’s Earth Day celebration at Red Orchard Park.

    Whatever the reason, the first day of sunshine in days was a welcome sight, both for visitors and for the dozens of people and organizations that had worked hard to make sure the event was a success, which all agreed that it was.

    Shelby County Parks Director Clay Cottongim said he was pleased with the weather and even more pleased with the turnout.

  • The Luci Center's indoor and outdoor riding rings are great places for the center to focus its therapeutic riding and hippotherapy services, but the center is looking for more.

    But this year the Luci Center is planning to add a sensory integration trail.

    The center, which opened in 1988, works with children and adults with disabilities through horse riding and related activities.

    As a member of the North American Riding for the Handicapped Association, the Luci Center uses several different techniques to help riders.

  • Mother Nature might have slowed him down, but she couldn't stop the Easter bunny on Saturday.

    As rain continued to drown the region this weekend, many egg hunts were canceled or moved inside.

    But it didn't stop the Finchville Ruritan Club from having its annual egg hunt around the old Finchville school.

    "My kids love it," Jeanine Barrett said. "They think it's more fun in the rain."

  • Before the first shots of the Civil War were fired 150 years ago - on April 12, 1861 - it was already clear that Kentucky would play an important role in shaping both the Confederate and Union sides.

    A border state like no other, Kentucky's legislature struggled to choose a side, finally settling with the Union, much to the delight of President Abraham Lincoln, a native.

  • Since the publication of – in both newspaper and book formats – my columns on Squire Boone, whose Painted Stone Station along Clear Creek was the forerunner of present-day Shelbyville, I have received additional information relating to his life and times.

    You may recall that, on Sept. 13, 1781, settlers fleeing Painted Stone for the relative safety of Linn’s Station were attached viciously by Indians in what has been described as “The Long Run Massacre.”

  • Richard Luebbert pauses as he considers how to describe his first book, just off the presses and already in a second printing:

    “Well, it’s about Jesus,” he says simply.

    The book is called, a little less simply, Jesus for the 21st Century, The Unified Gospel, which Luebbert describes as a “new look at the old, old story.”

    The book, which he will display at a signing April 21 at the Shelby County Public Library, is the combined gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John arranged in a new way

  • It may seem like an episode of The Amazing Raceevery time you step into Shelbyville's new Kroger Marketplace with its enormous size, new areas and international food flare giving it the feel of circumnavigating the globe.

    But on Wednesday it provided a home for CBS’ hit reality show.

    Hundreds lined up outside the store to get a chance to make a video with WLKY producers as an audition for the show from 6 to 8 p.m.

  • With all the calamity going on in Japan, one woman in Shelbyville wants to make a difference – if only she can get some help.

    Mallory Taylor said she saw the horrible destruction on television after an earthquake and tsunami destroyed coastal cities, killing thousands, and then unleashed the threat of nuclear contamination across the county.

    “I was crying and upset. It was terrible,” Taylor said. “I just wanted to do something.”

    And that’s what she set out to do – in any way that she could.