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Features

  • Halloween is creeping closer, and annual events designed to provide a scare or two are popping up on the calendar.

    In addition to the Trunk Or Treat events that have become popular at churches around Shelby County, the annual scare-you-to-death fundraisers are now open.

    Back for its fourth season, the Blood Orchard Curse is offering scary tours Fridays and Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight at Red Orchard Park on Kentucky Street.

    The costs is  $10 per person, and proceeds go to the Shelby County Parks and Recreation Department.

  • Much like the movement to explore the wilderness west, the Squire Boone Statue is gaining steam.

    Joseph Ruble's idea that hit the public last month of putting up a statue of the founder of Shelby County has caught the collective eye of the community.

  • The first Dorman Center Carnival brought hundreds of folks out to Daniel Field on Saturday to celebrate and support the early intervention center.

    The carnival raised more than $6,000 for Dorman Center, which provides help to more than 100 children ages 18-months to 5-years old that have been diagnosed with a disability, show signs of developmental delay, are at risk in their environment or have been determined to be in need of the program. The center starts with First Step early intervention and provides half and full day preschool classes.

  • If you spend any time at all talking with Al Brown, you will have no trouble understanding why he helped found the annual Fall Hunting Kickoff and Wild Game Feast, which is scheduled for Saturday night at Floral Hall on the Shelby County Fairgrounds.

    Brown, who is a fervent hunting enthusiast, is also passionate about helping the youth ministry of the Centenary United Methodist Church in Shelbyville, which is the beneficiary of the charity auction and eating event.

  • Last fall I got hurt in an accident, and for two months, I couldn't drive, write or keyboard. I was so overwhelmed by the many helpful things our family and friends thought to do and the joy they seemed to take in doing it that I began to wonder if there's something about a small town that develops some people's character such that they enjoy the right thing.

  • Les Bailey just back from a Mediterranean Cruise, had to run around attending to chores he’d neglected during his vacation, he said

    His son, Gary, describes him as “pretty amazing,”

    Karen Walters, his daughter, who accompanied him on the cruise, calls him “my inspiration.”

    He is known around his neighborhood as the unofficial “mayor of Scott Station.”

  • The circle means many things.
    You can circle the wagons for safety, and you can pull someone into your circle of friendship. Wedding rings are circles because they have no beginning and no end, going on forever.
    And the International Order of The King’s Daughters and Sons embodies much of those ideals their “circles,” or small groups, that filter down to provide aid on local levels.

  • The cool temperatures and rainy weather matched the weekend's official turn to fall, but they didn't stop the community from turning out for the Finchville Fall Festival. The annual event brought hundreds to its epicenter at the Finchville Ruritan Club where a big yard sale enticed buyers, and plenty of fun surrounded the booths.

    Fresh vegetables and gourds were available, and everything from an antique tractor show to a dunking booth and games were available to help ignore the wet weather.

  • Visitors to the Shelbyville Welcome Center on Main Street on Thursday probably felt like they had passed through a time warp.

    In addition to other historical exhibits already on display, the center, which houses the Shelbyville Historic District Commission’s office, featured a new exhibit that had just opened.

    The World War II era certainly should bring back a lot of memories for many people who come to see this exhibit, said Sharon Hackworth, co-chair of the Shelby County Historical Society.

  • The romance of Marquis Antoine “Tony” de Charette from Brittany, France, and Susanne Henning continued, despite the adamant opposition of her mother, Sue Henning of Allen Dale Farm in Shelby County.

    Sue Henning, concerned about Charette’s character and financial standing – her own family having endured difficult financial times – carried out an investigation to learn as much as she couldabout the man with whom her daughter was smitten.

  • Brad Holland spent Friday enduring just about every hardship the human body can endure – thirst, exposure to all kinds of weather, near dehydration, fatigue…you name it.

    But he wouldn’t have missed it for anything.

    Holland, a financial advisor who lives in Shelbyville with his wife, Audrey and three daughters, participated in a 25-mile marathon, from rim-to-rim in the Grand Canyon, all in the name of charity. The money he raised will be used to purchase a water supply system for residents in the Dominican Republic.

  • You walk and run in them. You work and style in them. And now, you can save lives with them.

    Shoes are the focus of an upcoming collection drive being organized by a local Cub Scouts pack, joining in a growing effort to convert donated footwear into fresh water systems in impoverished countries.

    Cub Scouts Pack 470, which primarily features Simpsonville Elementary School students, is organizing the drive, which is scheduled for Sept. 19-30. The school is the primary drop-off location, but the movement stretches well beyond local borders.

  • He only has one eye and goes by the name of “Chicken,” and not only has he stolen the hearts of all those at an animal rescue facility in Shelby County but also that of a woman 3,000 miles away.

    “He’s just the most amazing little guy you ever saw, and this woman is driving all the way out here from California to pick him up,” said Ashley Shelburne, founder of Tyson’s Chance, an animal rescue organization.

  • If you’re looking for something to do, Shelby County has a full lineup of activities in what is the busiest weekend of the fall.

    From historical re-enactments and lectures to parades and festivals to celebrating pets and commemorating the 10th anniversary of 9-11, there are three days of activities all over the county.

    The annual commemoration of the Long Run Massacre and Floyd’s Defeat, presented by the Painted Stone Settlers already began for students today and continues through Sunday at Red Orchard Park.

  • Things have certainly changed.

    The world is definitely a different place.

    But do we continue to learn, 10 years after the tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001?

    Students and teachers, no doubt, took time to discuss the matter in school this week. Maybe it was a small part of a lesson, maybe it was a whole class, but the events of that day do not appear to have worked their way into the fabric of U.S. and world history classes like D-day or the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

  • The threads we have woven together in the 10 years since terrorists stole commercial airliners and flew them into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and, with help, a field in Pennsylvania form a yarn that stretches across generations.

    We look back, and those of us who saw what happened, saw those Twin Towers pierced by jets, saw them one by one crumble and fall as if they were a child’s toys and not man-made spires, feel that yarn wrap around us with a tension that won’t ever quite ease up, even after days, weeks and years and – now – a decade.

  • No one has ever forgotten the terrible loss of American life 10 years ago at the hands of terrorists.

    Shelby County Sheriff Mike Armstrong called it one of the worst days in our nation’s history.

    Now, a decade after al-Qaida terrorists killed 3,000 people in four separate attacks in New York City, the Pentagon, and Pennsylvania, as the nation prepares to honor its dead on Sunday, many are reflecting upon the changes that terrible day has wrought on our society.

    In Shelby County, the answer is clear.

  • About 85 pilots will fill up the airspace over Moody Pike this weekend with aeronautical feats as high as 200 feet in the air and plummeting toward the ground before pulling up just feet over the grass.

    Of course, these pilots will be grounded for the entire third annual The Bruce F3K competition of discus launch gliders.

    The competition is the largest in the world, and the brainchild of Bruce Davidson, who lives on Moody Pike at the site of the contest.

  • When faced with an unplanned pregnancy, hope is a welcome word.

    With the surprise that often accompanies this revelation, there can also be fear, sadness or delayed joy. Hope comes with an understanding of the choices a woman has to live with her discovery. Hope comes with an embrace, a place of welcome, and a caring person to walk with in dealing with the event of an unplanned pregnancy. 

  • Although often overshadowed by his famous older brother Daniel, Squire Boone left a mark on Shelby County that will never be forgotten.

    After leaving the Falls of the Ohio settlement, which would eventually become Louisville, and establishing the Painted Stone settlement on Clear Creek in 1780, Boone and the 13 families he brought with him were the county's first permanent residents.

    And because of that, Joe Ruble believes Squire Boone should be better recognized here.