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Features

  • You walk and run in them. You work and style in them. And now, you can save lives with them.

    Shoes are the focus of an upcoming collection drive being organized by a local Cub Scouts pack, joining in a growing effort to convert donated footwear into fresh water systems in impoverished countries.

    Cub Scouts Pack 470, which primarily features Simpsonville Elementary School students, is organizing the drive, which is scheduled for Sept. 19-30. The school is the primary drop-off location, but the movement stretches well beyond local borders.

  • He only has one eye and goes by the name of “Chicken,” and not only has he stolen the hearts of all those at an animal rescue facility in Shelby County but also that of a woman 3,000 miles away.

    “He’s just the most amazing little guy you ever saw, and this woman is driving all the way out here from California to pick him up,” said Ashley Shelburne, founder of Tyson’s Chance, an animal rescue organization.

  • If you’re looking for something to do, Shelby County has a full lineup of activities in what is the busiest weekend of the fall.

    From historical re-enactments and lectures to parades and festivals to celebrating pets and commemorating the 10th anniversary of 9-11, there are three days of activities all over the county.

    The annual commemoration of the Long Run Massacre and Floyd’s Defeat, presented by the Painted Stone Settlers already began for students today and continues through Sunday at Red Orchard Park.

  • Things have certainly changed.

    The world is definitely a different place.

    But do we continue to learn, 10 years after the tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001?

    Students and teachers, no doubt, took time to discuss the matter in school this week. Maybe it was a small part of a lesson, maybe it was a whole class, but the events of that day do not appear to have worked their way into the fabric of U.S. and world history classes like D-day or the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

  • The threads we have woven together in the 10 years since terrorists stole commercial airliners and flew them into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and, with help, a field in Pennsylvania form a yarn that stretches across generations.

    We look back, and those of us who saw what happened, saw those Twin Towers pierced by jets, saw them one by one crumble and fall as if they were a child’s toys and not man-made spires, feel that yarn wrap around us with a tension that won’t ever quite ease up, even after days, weeks and years and – now – a decade.

  • No one has ever forgotten the terrible loss of American life 10 years ago at the hands of terrorists.

    Shelby County Sheriff Mike Armstrong called it one of the worst days in our nation’s history.

    Now, a decade after al-Qaida terrorists killed 3,000 people in four separate attacks in New York City, the Pentagon, and Pennsylvania, as the nation prepares to honor its dead on Sunday, many are reflecting upon the changes that terrible day has wrought on our society.

    In Shelby County, the answer is clear.

  • About 85 pilots will fill up the airspace over Moody Pike this weekend with aeronautical feats as high as 200 feet in the air and plummeting toward the ground before pulling up just feet over the grass.

    Of course, these pilots will be grounded for the entire third annual The Bruce F3K competition of discus launch gliders.

    The competition is the largest in the world, and the brainchild of Bruce Davidson, who lives on Moody Pike at the site of the contest.

  • When faced with an unplanned pregnancy, hope is a welcome word.

    With the surprise that often accompanies this revelation, there can also be fear, sadness or delayed joy. Hope comes with an understanding of the choices a woman has to live with her discovery. Hope comes with an embrace, a place of welcome, and a caring person to walk with in dealing with the event of an unplanned pregnancy. 

  • Although often overshadowed by his famous older brother Daniel, Squire Boone left a mark on Shelby County that will never be forgotten.

    After leaving the Falls of the Ohio settlement, which would eventually become Louisville, and establishing the Painted Stone settlement on Clear Creek in 1780, Boone and the 13 families he brought with him were the county's first permanent residents.

    And because of that, Joe Ruble believes Squire Boone should be better recognized here.

  • The band Caribou of Louisville will be playing at a pool party Saturday night at the Shelbyville Country Club. Paul Woods, a native of Shelby County,is drummer and vocalist in the band. Woods, 53, was educated at Shelbyville and Shelby County high schools and attended the University of Louisville and Murray State. He took a few moments for questions from The Sentinel-News about his career, Caribou and the event.

     

    The Sentinel-News: How did you become a part of Caribou?

  • Robert D. Kemper was considered a Shelby County hero long before he was killed in the line of duty in 1971, and 40 years later, efforts are being made to keep that memory alive forever.
    Work is under way to memorialize the U.S. Navy officer known as “Boo Boo,” who flew 256 combat missions as a fighter pilot during the Vietnam War and was killed while saving another aviator during a states-side training flight in 1971.

  • Bettie Allen Meriwether, owner of Allen Dale Farm in Shelby County, took great pride in knowing that her farm had been in her family since its establishment in 1795 by Robert Polk Allen. Her great grandmother, Ann Allen, widow of John Allen of Frederick County, Virginia, had been buried in the family graveyard on the property in 1805.

    She valued the land, having fought a successful legal battle (1885-1889) to wrest the farm from control of her brother, George Baylor Allen, whose plans to mortgage the property would have undoubtedly been tantamount to its sale.

  • The name Vintage Voodoo invokes old-world charm in New Orleans, back alleys and dark streets.

    But the Shelbyville-based band - consisting of guitarist Michael Whisman, lead singer Rick Willard, drummer Patrick Jacobs, guitarist Bobby Hardaway and bassist Greg Viergutz, the only member not from Shelbyville - said that's not quite the case.

    "Vintage Magic just didn't sound right. There's really nothing voodoo about us, but it's vintage because we're all old," Whisman said laughing.

  • “I had no idea, I can tell you I was just completely bowled over.”
    Those are the words  of Shelby County Attorney Hart Megibben, who Thursday was named 2011 Outstanding County Attorney by the office of the state attorney general.

    Megibben, accompanied by his family, attended the Prosecutor’s Conference in Louisville, where the award was announced. Two recipients are chosen each year, and the other was John Estill of Mason County.

    Megibben said he never expected to receive such an award and that was very honored.

  • Ever hear of a time-traveling farmer?
    That’s the plot of Shelby County resident William Greer’s first book, which was published two weeks ago.

    Greer also has another book coming out soon, a nonfiction work, based on his true-life experiences in Vietnam.

    What’s more, he has a third book that was recently accepted by his publisher.

    Believe it or not, there is something even more amazing than a novice writer having three books accepted and published all in the same year.

    What in the world could that be, you ask?

  • Some folks in Bagdad are trying to keep a light on for you, but they’re having a little trouble with the bill.

    The city lights in Bagdad – all 28 of them – are funded by annual assessments of the residents, but lately there have been some antes not being upped and the fund to pay the bill has gotten a little thin.

    So members of the Bagdad Ruritan Club are trying to collect money to pay the $225-a-month bill from Kentucky Utilities until the end of the year, when they hope to help form a better solution.

  • Jacob Brewer was all wet on Saturday, but that was fine with him.

    His wish to spend his 21st birthday water skiing at Guist Creek Lake came off without a hitch, to the delight of his family, who accompanied him from Columbus, Ohio, where Jacob Brewer lives, and Metro Louisville on his special day.

    That day was even more special for Brewer than it is for most people.

  • “Do I model the characters in my stories after my relatives? Well, I can tell you that I can see my aunts and uncles in my characters, but they can’t see themselves,” said Gurney Norman at a presentation at the public library Thursday night.

    Norman, a well-known author, popular for his stories about Appalachia, spoke to a crowd of about 30 people who gathered to hear him speak in one of the library’s Spend An Evening With An Author series.

  • Whether you’re into science fiction, do-it-yourself projects around the house, or biographies of famous people, a book sale at the public library this week offers all these topics and many, many more, all at a discounted cost.

  • An unofficial landmark left Shelbyville on Thursday when the old caboose on U.S. 60 just east of the city was carted off.

    The caboose was purchased nearly a year ago by Scott Nash, a retired teacher in Louisville, who hired Adkins Export Packing and Machinery Movers to cart the caboose to his home in Fern Creek.