.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000194 EndHTML:0000021007 StartFragment:0000002860 EndFragment:0000020971 SourceURL:file://localhost/Users/stevedoyle/Desktop/GENvanstockum_preludetowarPart1.doc

    Van Stockum Collection, Filson Historical Society, Louisville

     

    USS Panay sinking after Japanese attack on Dec. 12, 1937

     

    Van Stockum Collection, Filson Historical Society, Louisville

  • Just being able to sit up with minimum assistance and to pay attention when something is being read may not seem not a big achievement at all for a teenager.

    But for the family of 17-year-old Robbie Phillips, it’s something to be extremely grateful for this Thanksgiving.

     “I am just elated,” said Debbie Phillips, Robbie’s mother.

    You know the story about Robbie Phillips, a boy who was left with a severe brain injury in November 2008 when he tried to commit suicide by hanging himself at the age of 14.

  • Most families will gather hands around the dinner table on Thursday and give thanks for all they have – friends, family, food, shelter and happiness.

    But what Lenny Marr said he would like to see is the entire community come together, hand-in-hand on Tuesday at 7 p.m. during the county's two Community Thanksgiving Services.

  • It’s official: Shelby County is a good-hearted community – literally.

    Shelby County was named Kentucky’s first HeartSafe Community at a ceremony at the EMS station on Peytona Beach Road in Waddy on Wednesday, honoring the county for its public-health initiatives.

    Health and Family Services Cabinet Secretary Janie Miller and Acting Public Health Commissioner Steve Davis presented to county officials the HeartSafe Community Award, a designation for communities that have met a specific set of criteria to respond better to cardiac arrests.

  • Roy Wayne McIntosh, 78, went to be with his Heavenly Father following a brief illness on Saturday, November 12, 2011 in Louisville. He was born to Omer and Eva McIntosh of Shelbyville on November 22, 1932 who preceded him in death. Roy served in the U.S. Army after the Korean War. He retired from Hobart Manufacturing in Louisville and Browning Pontiac in Eminence. He was a member of New Liberty Christian Church but had been recently attending Southeast Christian Church. Roy enjoyed his daily routine of meeting with his friends at McDonald's in Shelbyville, KY.

  • For the 31st year Trims & Whims will set up shop in Shelby County, raising money for local scholarships during its run today and Saturday at Wright Elementary School.

    “We have a lot of new vendors to go along with several of our returning favorites,” said Joanna Freels, the co-chair of the event for Alpha Delta Kappa, the teachers’ sorority that puts on the yearly event.

  • In Iraq today, one of Shelby County’s native sons said he would spend his first Veterans Day doing what people who serve often do – missing his family.

     “I have a wonderful wife and a handsome little boy,” said Scott Gaines, 24, a firefighter with the Shelbyville Fire Department, husband of Angel Gaines, a firefighter with the Shelby County Fire Department and the father of a toddler, Braylon Scott Gaines.

  • A local church hopes to spread goodwill this holiday season by selling Christmas gifts that are a blessing to more than just those who receive them.

    This Sunday, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., the First Presbyterian Church of Shelbyville will host its  annual Alternative Gift Market, where patrons can donate money to various local, national and international charities on behalf of friends and family on their Christmas lists.

  • Representatives from seven Shelby County organizations voiced their gratitude Monday night at receiving funding from the Shelby County Community Foundation.

    “We are appreciative of this; it is the second year we have gotten funding, and it will help us a great deal,” said Lee Bean, founder and operator of the Open Door of Hope, a men’s shelter on 8th Street. “We have served one hundred and fifty men since opening two years ago, and we have helped more than half of those men to find jobs.”

  • Collins High School cheerleaders held their first House of Trees fundraiser for Relay For Life on Saturday.

    Jerilyn Hanks, cheerleading coach and special education teacher at Collins, said the event brought in $900 from the sale of 15 decorated Christmas trees that were on display at the school’s cafeteria.

    “We were pleased with our first time, and we will definitely hold it again next year,” she said.

  • As computers continue to make their way into more American homes, and as youngsters become more adept in their use, it’s important that parents impress on kids the importance of their posture in front of the computer.

    Chiropractors are already seeing young patients with repetitive motion injuries like carpal tunnel syndrome and chronic pain in their necks, backs, shoulders, wrists and hands.

    If a child is using a computer at a work station – the keypad, chair, table, monitor, etc. – set up for an adult, it’s an invitation to trouble.

  • This year, the honoring of veterans will begin a bit in advance of Veterans Day, which is Friday.

    The Shelby County Extension Homemakers will have their annual event Sunday to honor all veterans – active, retired, and reserved – all men and women who have ever served the nation.

    The event will be held at 2-4 p.m. at the Shelby County Extension Office on Frankfort Road. It will include refreshments and a short ceremony that will begin at 2:30.

  • Lee Meriwether had risen to fame in 1886, when, at the age of 23, he published his first book, A Tramp Trip: How to See Europe on Fifty Cents a Day, which became an instant bestseller.

    When visiting his young cousin at the American Soldiers and Sailors Club in Paris in 1918, he had quoted Kentucky-born Marquise Susanne Henning de Charette, my late wife’s mother, as follows: “Maybe the law says I am French, but I say I am an American and always shall be.”

  • The team of volunteers from Shelby County who created the memorial site for African-American soldiers slain near Simpsonville is making a bit of its own history.

    Representatives from the group will be in Frankfort next week to accept the award for Volunteer Organization or Group of the Year from the Kentucky Historical Society.

    The presentation will be in a ceremony at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 11 in the House chamber on the second floor in the Old State Capitol in downtown Frankfort.

  • She’s been described as a “good witch,” and those who see her around town this week will surely agree.

    Every year, the entire week leading up to Halloween, Linda Ethington gets all decked out in her witch garb whenever she goes anywhere, even to the grocery store, she said.

    “Everybody knows I’m crazy, and they just love it,” she said with a giggle.

  • Like any good ghost storyteller, Thomas Freese has learned to tell a tale with such strong description and emotion, that the listener often wonders if the story might actually be true.

    “In every good ghost story, there has to be a creative mix of history and mystery,” he said. “That’s what makes it interesting.”

  • My last column was about how I like small towns because they develop some people’s character.On a related subject, I have often heard that small Southern towns seem to develop some people into characters.I believe this is true, and to make these characters more enjoyable to you and to them,have for you three theories, two questions and a wager.

  • At a critical juncture in his young life, Lee Meriwether, wrote a painful letter, dated Feb. 23, 1885, to his revered father. “Dear Father,” he wrote “From various reasons I have decided to give up going to New Orleans; another trip I have determined upon however and I fear it will be against your advice and wishes. I have made up my mind to take my long talked of trip to Europe this summer & defer my Law studies until next September.”

  • What happens when you come home and see a window busted out, maybe a door slightly ajar or something out of place?

    Of course, you call the police, but unless you live on Main Street in Shelbyville, between 5th and 3rd streets, it's going to take a few minutes for help to arrive.

    If you are a registered gun owner, especially one certified to carry a weapon, you may be inclined to investigate on our own.

  • A small ceremony Friday at the Shelbyville Police Station to present an American flag to the governor turned out to be a much more emotional event than anyone had planned.

    Before the ceremony in which Myrranda Gentry, the wife of a Shelbyville police officer stationed in Iraq, presented Gov. Steve Beshear with a flag that had been flown over Saddam Hussein’s former palace on Sept. 11, everyone got an unexpected – and emotional – treat.

    Shelbyville PD Officer Bruce Gentry was able to be there, too, even though he is still in Iraq.