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Features

  • The team of volunteers from Shelby County who created the memorial site for African-American soldiers slain near Simpsonville is making a bit of its own history.

    Representatives from the group will be in Frankfort next week to accept the award for Volunteer Organization or Group of the Year from the Kentucky Historical Society.

    The presentation will be in a ceremony at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 11 in the House chamber on the second floor in the Old State Capitol in downtown Frankfort.

  • She’s been described as a “good witch,” and those who see her around town this week will surely agree.

    Every year, the entire week leading up to Halloween, Linda Ethington gets all decked out in her witch garb whenever she goes anywhere, even to the grocery store, she said.

    “Everybody knows I’m crazy, and they just love it,” she said with a giggle.

  • Like any good ghost storyteller, Thomas Freese has learned to tell a tale with such strong description and emotion, that the listener often wonders if the story might actually be true.

    “In every good ghost story, there has to be a creative mix of history and mystery,” he said. “That’s what makes it interesting.”

  • My last column was about how I like small towns because they develop some people’s character.On a related subject, I have often heard that small Southern towns seem to develop some people into characters.I believe this is true, and to make these characters more enjoyable to you and to them,have for you three theories, two questions and a wager.

  • At a critical juncture in his young life, Lee Meriwether, wrote a painful letter, dated Feb. 23, 1885, to his revered father. “Dear Father,” he wrote “From various reasons I have decided to give up going to New Orleans; another trip I have determined upon however and I fear it will be against your advice and wishes. I have made up my mind to take my long talked of trip to Europe this summer & defer my Law studies until next September.”

  • What happens when you come home and see a window busted out, maybe a door slightly ajar or something out of place?

    Of course, you call the police, but unless you live on Main Street in Shelbyville, between 5th and 3rd streets, it's going to take a few minutes for help to arrive.

    If you are a registered gun owner, especially one certified to carry a weapon, you may be inclined to investigate on our own.

  • A small ceremony Friday at the Shelbyville Police Station to present an American flag to the governor turned out to be a much more emotional event than anyone had planned.

    Before the ceremony in which Myrranda Gentry, the wife of a Shelbyville police officer stationed in Iraq, presented Gov. Steve Beshear with a flag that had been flown over Saddam Hussein’s former palace on Sept. 11, everyone got an unexpected – and emotional – treat.

    Shelbyville PD Officer Bruce Gentry was able to be there, too, even though he is still in Iraq.

  • Saturday dawned bright and sunny, just perfect for a fundraiser designed to bring light into a young woman’s world.

    More than 1,200 people attended “Save Savannah’s Sight,” held at the amphitheater at Clear Creek Park, which raised more than $22,000 to pay for a surgery that it is hoped will restore at least partial sight to Savannah Sanders.

    The 21-year old, who was blinded in a childhood accident at age 10, was present at the event, and even performed a comedy act on stage.

  • A new face among the Desperate Housewivesthis Sunday night may be familiar to many people around Shelby County.

    Ruby Lewis, who graduated from Shelby County High School’s class of 2003, will play “Chloe,” her first recurring role on television.

    “I know many people here will be watching her Sunday night, no doubt about it,” said Lewis’ mother, Eve Lawson Lewis. “Everyone loves to know someone who is on TV.”

  • Halloween is creeping closer, and annual events designed to provide a scare or two are popping up on the calendar.

    In addition to the Trunk Or Treat events that have become popular at churches around Shelby County, the annual scare-you-to-death fundraisers are now open.

    Back for its fourth season, the Blood Orchard Curse is offering scary tours Fridays and Saturdays, 8 p.m.-midnight at Red Orchard Park on Kentucky Street.

    The costs is  $10 per person, and proceeds go to the Shelby County Parks and Recreation Department.

  • Much like the movement to explore the wilderness west, the Squire Boone Statue is gaining steam.

    Joseph Ruble's idea that hit the public last month of putting up a statue of the founder of Shelby County has caught the collective eye of the community.

  • The first Dorman Center Carnival brought hundreds of folks out to Daniel Field on Saturday to celebrate and support the early intervention center.

    The carnival raised more than $6,000 for Dorman Center, which provides help to more than 100 children ages 18-months to 5-years old that have been diagnosed with a disability, show signs of developmental delay, are at risk in their environment or have been determined to be in need of the program. The center starts with First Step early intervention and provides half and full day preschool classes.

  • If you spend any time at all talking with Al Brown, you will have no trouble understanding why he helped found the annual Fall Hunting Kickoff and Wild Game Feast, which is scheduled for Saturday night at Floral Hall on the Shelby County Fairgrounds.

    Brown, who is a fervent hunting enthusiast, is also passionate about helping the youth ministry of the Centenary United Methodist Church in Shelbyville, which is the beneficiary of the charity auction and eating event.

  • Last fall I got hurt in an accident, and for two months, I couldn't drive, write or keyboard. I was so overwhelmed by the many helpful things our family and friends thought to do and the joy they seemed to take in doing it that I began to wonder if there's something about a small town that develops some people's character such that they enjoy the right thing.

  • Les Bailey just back from a Mediterranean Cruise, had to run around attending to chores he’d neglected during his vacation, he said

    His son, Gary, describes him as “pretty amazing,”

    Karen Walters, his daughter, who accompanied him on the cruise, calls him “my inspiration.”

    He is known around his neighborhood as the unofficial “mayor of Scott Station.”

  • The circle means many things.
    You can circle the wagons for safety, and you can pull someone into your circle of friendship. Wedding rings are circles because they have no beginning and no end, going on forever.
    And the International Order of The King’s Daughters and Sons embodies much of those ideals their “circles,” or small groups, that filter down to provide aid on local levels.

  • The cool temperatures and rainy weather matched the weekend's official turn to fall, but they didn't stop the community from turning out for the Finchville Fall Festival. The annual event brought hundreds to its epicenter at the Finchville Ruritan Club where a big yard sale enticed buyers, and plenty of fun surrounded the booths.

    Fresh vegetables and gourds were available, and everything from an antique tractor show to a dunking booth and games were available to help ignore the wet weather.

  • Visitors to the Shelbyville Welcome Center on Main Street on Thursday probably felt like they had passed through a time warp.

    In addition to other historical exhibits already on display, the center, which houses the Shelbyville Historic District Commission’s office, featured a new exhibit that had just opened.

    The World War II era certainly should bring back a lot of memories for many people who come to see this exhibit, said Sharon Hackworth, co-chair of the Shelby County Historical Society.

  • The romance of Marquis Antoine “Tony” de Charette from Brittany, France, and Susanne Henning continued, despite the adamant opposition of her mother, Sue Henning of Allen Dale Farm in Shelby County.

    Sue Henning, concerned about Charette’s character and financial standing – her own family having endured difficult financial times – carried out an investigation to learn as much as she couldabout the man with whom her daughter was smitten.

  • Brad Holland spent Friday enduring just about every hardship the human body can endure – thirst, exposure to all kinds of weather, near dehydration, fatigue…you name it.

    But he wouldn’t have missed it for anything.

    Holland, a financial advisor who lives in Shelbyville with his wife, Audrey and three daughters, participated in a 25-mile marathon, from rim-to-rim in the Grand Canyon, all in the name of charity. The money he raised will be used to purchase a water supply system for residents in the Dominican Republic.