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Features

  • It may not have been Mega Millions, but someone n the Simpsonville area has picked up a million dollars from the Kentucky Lottery.

    An unidentified person picked the five numbers of the Mega Millions drawing on Tuesday, and even though that person missed the Megaball, the $1 Megaplier pushed the $250,000 prize to $1 million.

    The winning numbers were 4-10-16-38-48 and the Megaball was 34. The Mega Millions game has drawings on Tuesday and Friday.

  • If you tune in the Miss America pageant Saturday night and think you see some familiar faces when the camera pans the audience, don’t bother rubbing your eyes.

    In the crowd of thousands in Las Vegas will be hundreds of Miss Kentucky’s closest friends – and more than 40 of that group will be from Shelby County.

    That’s because Ann-Blair Thornton, 21, a student at Western Kentucky, is wearing the banner of the bluegrass this week, and she’s the granddaughter of Bill and Ann Borders, longtime residents of Shelbyville.

  • Kerri Richardson and Shelley Catharine Johnson have a lot in common.

    Both are media spokespersons for high profile government offices, the governor and the attorney general, respectively.

    Both are dedicated, driven professionals  in their fields.

    Both are also Shelby County residents.

    Richardson, communications director for Gov. Steve Beshear, and Johnson, deputy communications director for Attorney General Jack Conway, say they have always gotten along well when their paths have crossed professionally from time to time.

  • With winter cold and falling temperatures comes an even better chance that lice can spread at schools.

    Although some parents have mentioned problems at schools on The Sentinel-News’ Facebook page, district officials said they are not aware of any major issues.

    Traci Early, the district health coordinator, said she has not heard of any outbreaks but added that she’s ready to help.

    “Parents can certainly contact me for help, or they can ask for help at the youth service centers at the schools,” she said.

  • Mary Ellen Hulker is not the woman she once was.

    And she’s glad.

    Hulker, 37, a mother of two, has lost half her body weight within a year’s time, shrinking from 317 pounds to 168.

    Her goal is to get to 130.

    Hulker underwent a lap-band procedure in December 2010, and she says she still marvels at the way her life has changed in just one short year.

  • New Year’s resolutions have come a long way since the tradition began with the early Babylonians, when the most popular resolution was to return borrowed farm equipment.

    For decades, in the United States at least, the most-popular resolutions revolve around health, fitness and finances.

    How do Shelby Countians’ resolutions for 2011 stack up against these?

    Surprisingly, most people The Sentinel-Newstalked to said they didn’t worry about it.

  • We couldn’t pick everyone, but you nominated dozens of others as possibles for Shelby’s Fabulous 5 2011:

    Charles Binion, Waddy Ruritan member

    Jerry Bowling, Shelbyville community volunteer

    Marti Brown, Father’s Love Children’s Church

    Jessica Carter, 12-year-old who helps children

    Willie Goodwin, hometown hero passed away

    Judy Phillips, Shelby County Touched Twice

    Hubert Pollett, community booster

    RobFest volunteers, fundraiser support

  • The Sentinel-Newssince 2008 has honored at year’s end five Shelby Countians we think have had a significant impact on our community during this year. For the first time, we asked for your nominations on our Facebook page, and we believe each person selected for what we call Shelby County’s Fabulous 5 has in his or her own way left an imprint that merits our honoring and emulating, represents a broad spectrum of a diverse society and truly is one of the best of our best.

     

  • Tom and Ruth Hodge own both Its Convenient stores located on U.S. 60, and for the past few decades, they have been known for their efforts in treating their customers like family.

    The Hodges make it a point to help out people in need in the community, and their most recent effort was collecting thousands of dollars for Bill Pearson, an elderly man who lost his home on Henry Clay Street in a fire that killed his brother. 

  • Gary Walls is a man with a mission: Nothing too big, just working to raise thousands of dollars to help people change their lives, that’s all.

    Walls is the co-founder and past president of Shelby County Community Charities, an organization that he and some others started in 1996 to raise money for families who have children or young adults in serious need of surgeries they can’t afford.

  • Mary Marshall spent 40 years coaching youth sports, ever since graduating from high school in the early 1950s.

    A single mother, Marshall, who found herself divorced at an early age, raised 7 children on her own, which in itself is no small accomplishment.

     “And they all went to college,”  she said with well-deserved pride.

    Marshall, who was quite athletic herself, had a passion for sports at an early age, coaching softball, soccer and baseball even before graduating from the Lincoln Institute in Simpsonville in 1952.

  • You see it all year round: Shelby Countians continuing to support their own like no other, raising thousands and thousands of dollars for dozens of organizations, charities and families in need.

    But maybe you don’t quite understand until you hear a special story that has all the earmarks of a script for a holiday movie on the Hallmark channel.

    This is one such story of Christmas angels in Shelby County.

  • Even in the midst of tough economic times, the giving spirit of Shelby Countians shines this holiday season through its support of local charities.

    So says leaders of several charitable efforts, including Bonnie Roberts, volunteer chairwoman of the local Salvation Army service unit.

  • No. 1:


     

    No. 2:

    Shelby County Magistrate Mike Whitehouse, whose district includes Finchville, holds his granddaughter, who was really taken with the Christmas program.

     

    No. 3:

    The Grinch was very popular with the children because of his innovative dance moves.

     

    No. 4:

  • Tracy Coffee Gayle says she has always loved to write and listen to stories.

    "When I was little, I wanted to be John Boy Walton because he got to write," she said. "I've always loved to write and listen to my parents’ stories and my grandparents’ stories."

    About 10 years ago Gayle, a fifth-grade teacher at Wright Elementary School, started working on a short story about a young girl named Vera, and, along with Gayle’s own family, Vera has grown.

  • When Jim Robinson arrived in Simpsonville to serve as the pastor of Simpsonville Christian Church 11 years ago, he saw children and families who were left out of Christmas gift-giving festivities.

    Many of his neighbors did not have the means to buy the extra goodies that make Christmas celebrations special. They had just enough to get by.

    The next year, Robinson and members of his Disciples of Christ congregation, started “No Child Left Behind,” so no one living in the 40067 zip code would be left behind at Christmas time.

  • Oh, the holidays, decking the tables and countertops and computer desks and, yes, even the bedside table, with platters and trays and candy dishes with yummy treats.

    Everyone has a favorite holiday dish, and many of you probably bring some of your best efforts and gifts to work to share with coworkers.

    Like Patricia Ann McKinney, for example, a clerk at the Shelby County Sheriff’s office, who made Haystacks  and almond bark cookies.

    “These recipes have been around for a long time,” she says.

  • Jeanne Kemper’s Jam Cake

    5 eggs, lightly beaten

    2 cups sugar

    3 cups flour

    1 cup butter

    1 cup buttermilk

    1 teaspoon soda

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    2 teaspoons cinnamon

    ½ teaspoon cloves

    ¼ teaspoon allspice

    ¼ teaspoon nutmeg

    1 cup raisins

    1 cup chopped pecans

    1 ½ cup seedless raspberry jam

     

  • Searching far and wide – from the knobs to the horse farms, from Pleasureville to Finchville – and soliciting suggestions from readers, we've boiled down the biggest Christmas trees in the county to two.

    Why two?

    Well, a real and a fake, of course.

    Just east of Simpsonville sits Al Smith's spread on the corner of Fields Lane and U.S. 60. Although probably more famous for the giant arrow (made from a telephone pole) that adorns his yard, Smith always drapes his flag pole in lights, forming a towering, 40-foot tall cascade of lights.

  • The weather wasn’t quite delightful, but neither was it frightful Saturday at the Christmas Parade, an event that had a specific theme this year.

    Touted as the Red, White and Blue American Christmas, the parade down Main Street featured 20 floats, up a few from last year, many of which featured patriotic themes, a couple of them depicting Ground Zero on Sept. 11, 2001.