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Features

  • Studies constantly are proving that what you eat can be as powerful and more potent than a prescribed drug. Recently, it was proven that the presence of fresh apples in your diet could improve your memory and sustain brain health.

  • Thomas Samuel Baxter, better known as T.S., is a name that should resonate throughout Shelby County and especially in Shelbyville.

    There are a lot of people who say they know his name, but very few who really know much about him.

    Baxter was the first African-American member of the Shelbyville City Council, but after recognizing that accomplishment, there seems to be a dearth of information and very little celebration of his life and work.

  • Shelby County’s pastoral countryside and get-away-from-it-all-draw have beckoned many a family to relocate to a setting that gives their children a chance to experience a simpler lifestyle, and it was those very magnets that attracted Mike and Gaye Cox to Shelby County more than 20 years ago.

    Gaye Cox, having grown up in Mississippi, met Mike, an Air Force kid, in school. They married young and ended up moving to Colorado. They decided early in their marriage that Gaye Cox would forgo working outside the home in order to work full-time raising their six children.

  • Shelby County was one of 38 communities across the state to share $1.8 million in federal grants for recreational trails projects.

    Shelby County will receive $42,500 of the $1,849,648, which it will use toward the construction of a youth fitness trail at Red Orchard Park in Shelbyville.

    Recipients received award documents Wednesday at a ceremony in Frankfort hosted by Kentucky First Lady Jane Beshear.

  • Following in the footsteps of a nationwide trend toward healthy eating and tracing food from farm to table, Shelby County is getting its first community garden.

    The North Central Health District and Shelby County government have worked together to set aside a plot of land – at the confluence of Kentucky, 11th and Equity streets, behind the North Central and Shelbyville health departments – for the first garden area.

  • “We joined the Navy to see the girls

    
And what did we see?

    We saw the sea

    Instead of a girl or two in a taxi

    We were compelled to look at the Black Sea

    Seeing the Black Sea isn't what it's cracked up to be

    From “Follow the Fleet,” a 1936 Hollywood musical comedy, starring film stars Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

     

  • Was Coty Brewer all shook up when he and his bride, Sara Morgan, tied the knot on Valentine’s Day?

    Probably so, because he and his bride were married on live television by Elvis – or close enough anyway.

    Elvis Presley impersonator Otis Berry, a minister who owns and operates Indiana’s Chapel in the Hill, journeyed to Louisville on Tuesday to perform the ceremony for the couple on WHAS-Channel 11’s Great Day Live,a daily entertainment and talk show hosted by Terry Meiners and Rachel Platt.

  • Are you on the trail for unusual, extravagant or over-the-top Valentine's Day gifts?

    You'll come up short in Shelby County.

    Don't worry though. A county with traditional and conservative values doesn't come up short in the romance department. There are plenty of delicious meals, flowers and jewelry to make any honey happy.

    But there's no $18,500 olive tree, like Angelina Jolie gave her hubby Brad Pitt in 2010. Of course, Kentucky's not exactly the right climate anyway.

  • What would happen if World War II and Vietnam era veterans put their heads together to identify an area where they could really use some help?

    It didn’t take about 17 members of the VFW Post 1179 in Shelbyville very long to do just that Monday night.

    “We need to learn how to use a computer,” was the general consensus around the long table where the vets met to brainstorm.

    “I have a computer; I just don’t know how to turn it on,” one said.

  • A crowd of about 150 turned out for the Ducks Unlimited Banquet at Friday night at Claudia Sanders Dinner House, raising $14,400 for the organization.

    That figure was slightly higher than last year’s total of $14,259.

    About $4,000 came from ticket sales and the rest from silent auction proceeds.

    Chris Cottongim, chairperson of Ducks Unlimited, said the proceeds would go to promote conservation of wetlands where ducks make their homes.

  • After proclaiming Friday to be “Wear Red Day,” Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty glanced around at the sea of red, pink and mauve-clad women at a luncheon.
     

    “Wow, I thought the Cardinals were playing today when I first came in here,” he said, as the crowd laughed.

    The event, Go Red for Women, was held at the Shelby County Extension Office in recognition of American Heart month in February.

  • Get ready for the Super Bulge on Sunday.

    Annually considered the second largest day of food consumption behind Thanksgiving, Super Bowl Sunday has turned into a celebration that goes well beyond any football game.

    If the excessive media coverage surrounding Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski's ankle and the protective boot he may or may not be wearing hasn't pushed you over the edge, then surely the TV time spent focused on what to serve, how to serve it, what to serve it with and how to make it fun has.

  • Dance instructor Bob Devers changes the CD in the stereo, and about 20 people line up and start dancing to the Fat Joe and Nelly hit "Get It Poppin'."

    Not a song you would expect to hear in a line-dancing class.

    It's not just rap music, but pop, country and oldies tunes fill the space reserved for the class at the Family Activity Center at Clear Creek Park in Shelbyville on Friday evenings.

    One of the participants, Alma Clark, said she has been line dancing for 20 years.

    "I just love it," Clark said.

  • The word mansion comes to mind when you turn through the gate where Phil and Chris Hayes call home on the 1100 block of Main Street in Shelbyville.

    The Hayes took on a “labor of love” nine years ago when they bought that is becoming more endearing each year, they say.

    But this 25-room historic home on the corner of Main and Magnolia streets, in Chris Hayes’ words, “just needed to someone to love it.”

  • The Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency has been awarded a $1 million grant federal grant for a program that will promote healthy marriages and relationships.

    The $1,034,712 federal grant, which spans three years, is from the United States Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families, and Kim Embrey-Hill, executive director of Multi-Purpose, said her agency is one of only 60 such agencies in the country to receive this grant.

  • She’s a beauty, a 1966 Ford Mustang in Playboy Pink, dubbed the Pink Lady, for obvious reasons.

    She once roamed the streets of sunny California and was picked up in Utah by owners Mike and Gloria Bazan, who brought her home to Shelbyville nearly two decades ago and lovingly restored her until she was, well, in the pink.

    She’s a winner of many awards and has been featured in numerous magazine articles and photographs, including the pages of this newspaper at least twice.

    Indeed, the Pink Lady causes quite a stir wherever she goes.

  • Celebrations in Shelby County this long weekend recapped how Martin Luther King Jr. led the country during a difficult time of progress. But those same celebrations served as a prompt to those in attendance that King's work is far from finished.

    "Ultimately his message was one of change in America," said DeVone Holt, who spoke at the first Whitney M. Young Job Corps Educational event and basketball tournament. "He wanted to change how white America looked at black America and how black America looked at white America.

  • Recently I have read favorable reviews of a current movie production War Horse, directed by Stephen Spielberg. It has been described as an inspirational movie about World War I and the role played by horses. In my early years this war was just called the “World War” or the “Great War.” A sequel was not anticipated, because it was “The War to End all Wars!’

  • Shelby Prevention has joined the ranks of organizations feeling the bite of the economic crunch.

    Board members met Friday for the first in a series of several sustainability workshops designed to find ways to make the organization self-sustaining in the event that funding becomes unavailable in the future, which is a distinct possibility, Director Elizabeth Pulliam said.

    At the workshop, held at the Shelby County Cooperative Extension Office, Pulliam told several board members who had gathered that the 5-year Drug-Free Communities grant is coming to an end soon.

  • I consider a family or friend relationship to be healthy if it is mutually kind, respectful and honest. Giving uninvited criticism or advice is not respectful.

    More and more people are telling me they don't have any of these healthy relationships for exploring uncomfortable ideas. Think with me here about whether this is true in your life, and if so, why, and what you can do about it.