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Features

  • A local family doctor has retired after 40 years of practice.

    Dr. William Powers’ last day at his office was Thursday, but he will officially retire Sunday, when a reception is scheduled in his honor.

    Powers and his wife, Sondra, and their daughter, Sacha, moved to Shelbyville in November 1972, when he joined the medical practice of Dr. Ron Waldridge, who retired in July 2010.

    During his years of practice, Powers was an active member of the medical staff of Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, serving as a past president and on various committees.

  • “It’s like getting hit by water from a fire hose!”

    That was the image offered by renowned data analyst Ron Crouch as he began his presentation Saturday morning to a few dozen people at the Shelby County Courthouse.

    Crouch serves as director of research statistics for the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, and his life is demographics and databases.

  • In restoring their 182-year-old home near Eminence they bought in 1983, Lawrence and Sherry Jelsma have kept almost all of its original features, and the effect is startlingly akin to being transported back in time.

    One can almost see the women with their long skirts sweeping the floor and hear the clop of horses' hooves along the brick walkway that still graces the front of the stately old brick home.

  • Anyone who attended the Touched Twice Ministries’ free medical and hygienic clinic on Saturday would agree that the organizers thought of just about everything.

    Spread throughout three floors and basement of First Baptist Church Shelbyville on Midland Trail,  36 local businesses pitched in to provide services in everything from hairdressing to a thrift shop to counseling to personal hygiene.

    A wide range of medical services were provided as well, including chiropractic, dental, vision, and blood pressure and other screenings.

  • Wyatt Hurst of Shelbyville will be making his television debut at an extremely early age – in fact, he’s so young, he probably won’t even remember it when he’s grown.

    Hurst, a tender 2 years old, will appear on America’s Funniest Home Videos (ABC-WHAS-Ch. 11) on Sunday night at 7.

    The toddler is the younger child of Josh and Malia Hurst, who also have a 4-year-old, Sophie.

    The upcoming episode was brought to the attention of The Sentinel-News by the boy’s grandfather, Shelby County Jailer Bobby Waits.

  • Green beer, a long-time staple on St. Patrick’s Day, seems to be headed out with the snakes that St. Patrick infamously drove away.
    The concoction is nothing more than a few drops of green food coloring in a pint of yellow fizzy mass-produced American lager, and it seems people just aren’t dancing an Irish jig for it anymore.
    In fact, some Irish traditions say green is bad luck, especially if a bride wears it on her wedding day.

  • As our nation commemorates the 150th Anniversary of the presidency of Abraham Lincoln (1861-65) and we learn more details about his assassination, it may be timely to record the assassination in 1820 of Charles-Ferdinand, the Duc de Berry, a significant event in French history.

    It involves Shelby County, at least indirectly, because my late wife, Susanne de Charette Van Stockum, was his direct descendant.

  • A science-minded brother and sister from Shelbyville now know what it’s like to fly a space shuttle, pilot a jet fighter, the feeling of being weightless and even dealing with a tornado.

    Well, sort of.

    Marina and Samuel White experienced all that and more during a week at the Honeywell Leadership Challenge Academy (HLCA), a partnership venture with the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala.

  • Walking in a winter wonderland is supposed to enjoyed closer to Christmas than Easter, but on Monday Shelby Countians got their first chance of the season.

    The National Weather Service reported amounts of 5 to 6 inches across Shelby County from an overnight snowfall, the maximum recorded in any county, although some readers displayed rulers in snow that pushed 7 inches in depth.

    Doubtless some early blooms were confused as they tried to poke their heads through the snow to take advantage of the sunshine that followed.

  • Recently, local storms have ripped away people’s lives, homes and downtown landscapes. The damage of property and casualty has been obvious, staggering. The damage to hearts and minds has been insidious, and sometimes, paralyzing.

    At what point does a fear of storms become a pathology in need of treatment? What causes these fears to get out of hand, and what can bring them back under control?

  • Did you ever wonder who determines how many disabled-parking spaces a business or public facility should have and where they should be placed?

    Gail Renfro, director of Human Resources for the Shelby County Fiscal Court, said those specifications are regulated by the Kentucky Office of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    “The ADA determines how many [parking] spaces a business should have,” she said.

  • “I like to see a man proud of the place in which he lives. I like to see a man who lives in it so that his place will be proud of him.”

    —    Abraham Lincoln

    President Abraham Lincoln’s words hang inside Edward “Hoppy” Bennett’s office and resonate throughout the grounds of Undulata.

    Bennett bought the famous old home at auction in 1994 after it had fallen into some disrepair.

  • Studies constantly are proving that what you eat can be as powerful and more potent than a prescribed drug. Recently, it was proven that the presence of fresh apples in your diet could improve your memory and sustain brain health.

  • Thomas Samuel Baxter, better known as T.S., is a name that should resonate throughout Shelby County and especially in Shelbyville.

    There are a lot of people who say they know his name, but very few who really know much about him.

    Baxter was the first African-American member of the Shelbyville City Council, but after recognizing that accomplishment, there seems to be a dearth of information and very little celebration of his life and work.

  • Shelby County’s pastoral countryside and get-away-from-it-all-draw have beckoned many a family to relocate to a setting that gives their children a chance to experience a simpler lifestyle, and it was those very magnets that attracted Mike and Gaye Cox to Shelby County more than 20 years ago.

    Gaye Cox, having grown up in Mississippi, met Mike, an Air Force kid, in school. They married young and ended up moving to Colorado. They decided early in their marriage that Gaye Cox would forgo working outside the home in order to work full-time raising their six children.

  • Shelby County was one of 38 communities across the state to share $1.8 million in federal grants for recreational trails projects.

    Shelby County will receive $42,500 of the $1,849,648, which it will use toward the construction of a youth fitness trail at Red Orchard Park in Shelbyville.

    Recipients received award documents Wednesday at a ceremony in Frankfort hosted by Kentucky First Lady Jane Beshear.

  • Following in the footsteps of a nationwide trend toward healthy eating and tracing food from farm to table, Shelby County is getting its first community garden.

    The North Central Health District and Shelby County government have worked together to set aside a plot of land – at the confluence of Kentucky, 11th and Equity streets, behind the North Central and Shelbyville health departments – for the first garden area.

  • “We joined the Navy to see the girls

    
And what did we see?

    We saw the sea

    Instead of a girl or two in a taxi

    We were compelled to look at the Black Sea

    Seeing the Black Sea isn't what it's cracked up to be

    From “Follow the Fleet,” a 1936 Hollywood musical comedy, starring film stars Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

     

  • Was Coty Brewer all shook up when he and his bride, Sara Morgan, tied the knot on Valentine’s Day?

    Probably so, because he and his bride were married on live television by Elvis – or close enough anyway.

    Elvis Presley impersonator Otis Berry, a minister who owns and operates Indiana’s Chapel in the Hill, journeyed to Louisville on Tuesday to perform the ceremony for the couple on WHAS-Channel 11’s Great Day Live,a daily entertainment and talk show hosted by Terry Meiners and Rachel Platt.

  • Are you on the trail for unusual, extravagant or over-the-top Valentine's Day gifts?

    You'll come up short in Shelby County.

    Don't worry though. A county with traditional and conservative values doesn't come up short in the romance department. There are plenty of delicious meals, flowers and jewelry to make any honey happy.

    But there's no $18,500 olive tree, like Angelina Jolie gave her hubby Brad Pitt in 2010. Of course, Kentucky's not exactly the right climate anyway.