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Features

  • WHAT: Free health screenings for men
    WHEN:
    8 a.m.-noon, June 9
    WHERE:
    Jewish Hospital Shelbyville
    APPOINTMENTS:
    They are encouraged band can be made by calling  502-647-4000.
    OTHER:
    Drop-in visits also are welcome.
    MORE INFORMATION:
    Call 502-647-4000

     

    By Beth Herrinton-Hodge
    Sentinel-News Correspondent

  • The sun may have been fickle in Bagdad on Saturday, but the smiles on the faces of those who attended the town's 20th anniversary festival lit up the day all over the small community.

  • This article is for readers who have a loved one who refuses to follow doctor’s orders for recovery from a medical problem. It assumes you have read first the article I wrote for your loved one, “Are You in Defiance of Medical Compliance?”

    And like that first piece, if you read the rest of this article and get turned off, I hope you will at least have the courage and wisdom to ask yourself the two questions in the last paragraph.

  • Did you ever wonder what it would be like to be a firefighter?
    Now you can find out without having to undergo any training at all.

    The Firefighter for a Day program, held by the Shelbyville Fire Department, will take place July 14, and will allow participants to come as close to experiencing a real firefighting experience as possible.

  • The Shelbyville Department of Public Works is going native with its facility, and it needs the public’s help.

    Starting today, Public Works will be planting more than 1,800 native plants in its new rain garden, bioretention treatment basin and constructed wetlands area at its facility at 787 Kentucky St.

    The new features are part of the department’s efforts to clean the stormwater runoff from its own property and to educate the public as part of the EPA’s Municipal Separate Stormwater Sewer Systems (MS4) program.

  • Has your doctor told you that you are making yourself sick, that your pain or disability will continue to get worse until you change your lifestyle? Perhaps you have had trouble complying with doctor’s orders about alcohol, cigarettes, street drugs, prescription pills, physical therapy, losing weight, getting exercise, eating a balanced diet, or changing your high-stress lifestyle.

    If you read the rest of this article and get turned off, I hope you will at least have the courage and wisdom to ask yourself the question at the end of this article.

  • Between 1783 and 1786, Joseph Hornsby, prosperous and prominent resident of Williamsburg, Virginia, had acquired five land grants in present-day Shelby County (which was then Jefferson County, Va.), including 2,400 acres on Plum Run and 400 on Fox Run.

    In 1797 or early 1798, Hornsby, then a widower, brought his family to Kentucky, making his home on his 2,400-acre tract near Simpsonville, now in Shelby County, which he called “Grasslands.”

  • A Shelbyville shop owner is still shaking his head in amazement and gratitude after postal employees returned a large amount of cash he had lost.

    Billy Andriot, co-owner with his wife, Geri, of W. Cromwell men’s shop at Wakefield- Scearce Gallery, accidentally dropped his day’s bank deposit for his shop into a mailbox when mailing some letters on April 21.

    He and his wife when to lunch, and upon leaving the restaurant, he said he missed the envelope he was going to take to the bank.

  • One thing that people like about the Kentucky Derby, aside from horses, of course, is the glamour surrounding the event.

    Everyone is excited about maybe getting a chance to glimpse of a celebrity or two, or to dress up in fancy hats or just enjoy a tasty mint julep.

  • Judy Heidal is a spunky, “glass is half full” kind of person who in 1980, through an odd series of circumstances, came to call Shelbyville home – which has brought her a lifetime of free lunches.

    While making their way to Frankfort for Ron to check out a potential job, Heidal and her husband, Ron, stopped at Shelbyville to get gasoline.  She said she remembers having an instant, positive impression of what was then a “one stoplight town.”

  • Receiving a Distinguished Citizen Award, having several people speak about him and getting a standing ovation all added up to an emotional night for Ray Leathers on Thursday.

    “I am overwhelmingly humbled to receive this award,” said Leathers to a crowd of about 150 people at the Cardinal Club in Simpsonville.

    Leathers, who lives in Shelbyville with his wife, Rosalie, was the first recipient of the award, established this year by the Boy Scouts of America to recognize a person who has made significant contributions to the community.

  • There are a variety of active lodges in Shelby County. Their meetings and fundraisers show up in events listings, and you may know members.

    But the groups – unlike circles that support local entities – sometimes appear secret and even mysterious, with that being supported by legend.

    But they are hardly new.

  • It’s difficult to catch Mary Spinks and Mae Bates in a stationary mode.

    These two best friends have been exercising together ever since meeting in an exercise class in 2005.

    “We met right here, at Body Recall,” Spinks said in a recent interview after a Shelby Shape Up class at the Shelby County Extension Office.

    “We were Morning Glories then, the group, I mean,” Bates said, breaking into laughter at the look on her friend’s face.

    After that introduction, the two decided to get serious about exercise.

  • Clean-up crews from Centro Latino will soon be a familiar sight around town, easily identifiable by tan t-shirts with red lettering.

    Sister Pat Reno, executive director for Centro Latino, said a clean-up project kicked off Saturday at the Church of the Annunciation with a group of 12 volunteers who worked on the church grounds, raking, weeding, trimming brush and just doing general tidying up.

  • You likely have seen signs along Interstate 64 in Kentucky bearing the inscription Purple Heart Trail, but do you know why they are there?

    In December 2002, I-64 from Ashland to Louisville was designated The Purple Heart Trail in recognition of the sacrifices of the service men and women wounded in action.

    Introduced into legislation by then state Sen. Elizabeth Tori of Radcliff, the bill was signed into law by Gov. Paul Patton, who attended a ceremony at the welcome center in Shelby County announce it.

  • Stacey Babb’s son, Alex, is 5 years old. When he was about 6 months old, she was diagnosed with a brain tumor and went through surgery, radiation and chemotherapy.

    While the cancer seemed to be gone, her medical bills were overwhelming. She was unable to work, and her husband, Tim, had to work from home to care for her and her son.

  • As you head out to work today, will you avoid black cats, ladders and looking in your rearview mirror for fear of cracking it? Or will you scoff at those who fear Friday 13th?

    After all, it's just another day.

    Or is it?

    Triskaidekaphobia, the fear of Friday the 13th, whether you take it seriously or not, has had a real impact on American society.

  • Shelby County now has its own amateur radio emergency service, joining the ranks of dozens of ham radio clubs across Kentucky.

    Along with acquiring new technology, the group is looking to recruit new members to help with what it says it believes is a growing need, providing emergency communications for local agencies during times of disaster.

  • State officials are worried about the effect of a mosquito outbreak on Kentucky’s equine population, so much so that the commissioner of agriculture has issued a warning to horse owners to vaccinate their animals against the West Nile virus.

    “While we do not wish to cause unnecessary alarm, we are concerned about the equine population’s vulnerability to this potentially deadly disease,” Commission James Comer said in a press statement released last week.

  • Chris McManus, a direct descendant of Joseph W. Hornsby (1740-1807), visited Shelbyville years ago, leaving in the Shelby County Public Library a copy of a transcript of his ancestor's diary, together with significant biographical information.

    Later, I initiated correspondence with McManus in the hope of finding out more about Ann Allen, his ancestor who happened also to be my late wife Susanne's great, great, great grandmother. Ann Allen died in 1805 and is buried in the Allen Dale Farm graveyard.