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Features

  • Clean-up crews from Centro Latino will soon be a familiar sight around town, easily identifiable by tan t-shirts with red lettering.

    Sister Pat Reno, executive director for Centro Latino, said a clean-up project kicked off Saturday at the Church of the Annunciation with a group of 12 volunteers who worked on the church grounds, raking, weeding, trimming brush and just doing general tidying up.

  • You likely have seen signs along Interstate 64 in Kentucky bearing the inscription Purple Heart Trail, but do you know why they are there?

    In December 2002, I-64 from Ashland to Louisville was designated The Purple Heart Trail in recognition of the sacrifices of the service men and women wounded in action.

    Introduced into legislation by then state Sen. Elizabeth Tori of Radcliff, the bill was signed into law by Gov. Paul Patton, who attended a ceremony at the welcome center in Shelby County announce it.

  • Stacey Babb’s son, Alex, is 5 years old. When he was about 6 months old, she was diagnosed with a brain tumor and went through surgery, radiation and chemotherapy.

    While the cancer seemed to be gone, her medical bills were overwhelming. She was unable to work, and her husband, Tim, had to work from home to care for her and her son.

  • As you head out to work today, will you avoid black cats, ladders and looking in your rearview mirror for fear of cracking it? Or will you scoff at those who fear Friday 13th?

    After all, it's just another day.

    Or is it?

    Triskaidekaphobia, the fear of Friday the 13th, whether you take it seriously or not, has had a real impact on American society.

  • Shelby County now has its own amateur radio emergency service, joining the ranks of dozens of ham radio clubs across Kentucky.

    Along with acquiring new technology, the group is looking to recruit new members to help with what it says it believes is a growing need, providing emergency communications for local agencies during times of disaster.

  • State officials are worried about the effect of a mosquito outbreak on Kentucky’s equine population, so much so that the commissioner of agriculture has issued a warning to horse owners to vaccinate their animals against the West Nile virus.

    “While we do not wish to cause unnecessary alarm, we are concerned about the equine population’s vulnerability to this potentially deadly disease,” Commission James Comer said in a press statement released last week.

  • Chris McManus, a direct descendant of Joseph W. Hornsby (1740-1807), visited Shelbyville years ago, leaving in the Shelby County Public Library a copy of a transcript of his ancestor's diary, together with significant biographical information.

    Later, I initiated correspondence with McManus in the hope of finding out more about Ann Allen, his ancestor who happened also to be my late wife Susanne's great, great, great grandmother. Ann Allen died in 1805 and is buried in the Allen Dale Farm graveyard.

  • In 1797 or early 1798, a prominent Virginian departed Williamsburg and settled his family in Shelby County. He was Joseph Hornsby, who, in his few years in Kentucky, was to make a significant contribution to his new home.

    When he arrived in Shelby County, Kentucky had been a state only five years. According to the 1800 census, Shelbyville, with a population of 262, was the seventh-largest town, and Louisville had only 359 residents.

  • Officials say they are excited that the latest County Health Rankings show Shelby County as the ninth healthiest county in the state – a jump from 12th

    last year.

  • A local family doctor has retired after 40 years of practice.

    Dr. William Powers’ last day at his office was Thursday, but he will officially retire Sunday, when a reception is scheduled in his honor.

    Powers and his wife, Sondra, and their daughter, Sacha, moved to Shelbyville in November 1972, when he joined the medical practice of Dr. Ron Waldridge, who retired in July 2010.

    During his years of practice, Powers was an active member of the medical staff of Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, serving as a past president and on various committees.

  • “It’s like getting hit by water from a fire hose!”

    That was the image offered by renowned data analyst Ron Crouch as he began his presentation Saturday morning to a few dozen people at the Shelby County Courthouse.

    Crouch serves as director of research statistics for the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, and his life is demographics and databases.

  • In restoring their 182-year-old home near Eminence they bought in 1983, Lawrence and Sherry Jelsma have kept almost all of its original features, and the effect is startlingly akin to being transported back in time.

    One can almost see the women with their long skirts sweeping the floor and hear the clop of horses' hooves along the brick walkway that still graces the front of the stately old brick home.

  • Anyone who attended the Touched Twice Ministries’ free medical and hygienic clinic on Saturday would agree that the organizers thought of just about everything.

    Spread throughout three floors and basement of First Baptist Church Shelbyville on Midland Trail,  36 local businesses pitched in to provide services in everything from hairdressing to a thrift shop to counseling to personal hygiene.

    A wide range of medical services were provided as well, including chiropractic, dental, vision, and blood pressure and other screenings.

  • Wyatt Hurst of Shelbyville will be making his television debut at an extremely early age – in fact, he’s so young, he probably won’t even remember it when he’s grown.

    Hurst, a tender 2 years old, will appear on America’s Funniest Home Videos (ABC-WHAS-Ch. 11) on Sunday night at 7.

    The toddler is the younger child of Josh and Malia Hurst, who also have a 4-year-old, Sophie.

    The upcoming episode was brought to the attention of The Sentinel-News by the boy’s grandfather, Shelby County Jailer Bobby Waits.

  • Green beer, a long-time staple on St. Patrick’s Day, seems to be headed out with the snakes that St. Patrick infamously drove away.
    The concoction is nothing more than a few drops of green food coloring in a pint of yellow fizzy mass-produced American lager, and it seems people just aren’t dancing an Irish jig for it anymore.
    In fact, some Irish traditions say green is bad luck, especially if a bride wears it on her wedding day.

  • As our nation commemorates the 150th Anniversary of the presidency of Abraham Lincoln (1861-65) and we learn more details about his assassination, it may be timely to record the assassination in 1820 of Charles-Ferdinand, the Duc de Berry, a significant event in French history.

    It involves Shelby County, at least indirectly, because my late wife, Susanne de Charette Van Stockum, was his direct descendant.

  • A science-minded brother and sister from Shelbyville now know what it’s like to fly a space shuttle, pilot a jet fighter, the feeling of being weightless and even dealing with a tornado.

    Well, sort of.

    Marina and Samuel White experienced all that and more during a week at the Honeywell Leadership Challenge Academy (HLCA), a partnership venture with the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala.

  • Walking in a winter wonderland is supposed to enjoyed closer to Christmas than Easter, but on Monday Shelby Countians got their first chance of the season.

    The National Weather Service reported amounts of 5 to 6 inches across Shelby County from an overnight snowfall, the maximum recorded in any county, although some readers displayed rulers in snow that pushed 7 inches in depth.

    Doubtless some early blooms were confused as they tried to poke their heads through the snow to take advantage of the sunshine that followed.

  • Recently, local storms have ripped away people’s lives, homes and downtown landscapes. The damage of property and casualty has been obvious, staggering. The damage to hearts and minds has been insidious, and sometimes, paralyzing.

    At what point does a fear of storms become a pathology in need of treatment? What causes these fears to get out of hand, and what can bring them back under control?

  • Did you ever wonder who determines how many disabled-parking spaces a business or public facility should have and where they should be placed?

    Gail Renfro, director of Human Resources for the Shelby County Fiscal Court, said those specifications are regulated by the Kentucky Office of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    “The ADA determines how many [parking] spaces a business should have,” she said.