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Features

  • A fire Sunday afternoon destroyed a mobile home at 320 B Street in Marshall Terrace, a mobile home park in the Hi Point area off Washington Street.

    Shelby County Assistant Fire Chief Jeff Ivers said the 911 call came in 1:07 p.m., and heavy smoke and fire were pouring out of the trailer when firefighters arrived.

    He said all of the occupants of the home were outside except for one person, who came out shortly after firefighters arrived.

  • Downtown Shelbyville was awash in the glow of good lighting on Monday.

    A film crew from City On A Hill Productions spent the entire day into the evening at the Shelby County Courthouse on 5th and Main streets, blocking the side street for the day and, at some times, one lane of Main Street. The crew also shot at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville at an earlier date.

    Producer Cassie Pelan said the movie, Acts of God,nearly is finished shooting, wrapping its sixth of seven weeks of filming, but the film won’t be ready until next year.

  • Despite the rain Saturday, the first Squire Boone Day festival continued as planned.
    Downpours, thunder and lightning pummeled Shelby County for most of the morning Saturday, curtailing the opening of the festival and delaying its program until around 1 p.m. at the Clear Creek Park Amphitheater and Col. Sanders Pavilion. A variety of musical acts were on stage until the final show at 9 p.m. There also was a re-enactment, fund-raising auctions and several shopping and food options.

  • John Elmer Kalmey, whose family has been in the dairy business in Kentucky for at least three generations, was introduced to the dairy as a toddler.

    He recalls being 5 years old, accompanying his father in the fields, being seated on a tractor and told to hold the steering wheel steady while the tractor moved slowly ahead, with his father on one side and his uncle on the other, each picking corn.

  • When Shelby County native Drew Howell released his first book, Expendable Assets, he said more books would follow.

    He hasn’t let readers down on that promise, recently releasing Irish Pennant and promising even more books will be published.

  • Kids in Shelby County are now into their 10-week vacations from school, but their parents still have to work, with maybe a week or some days off here and there.

    Working parents count on the hours that students are in classrooms to consume a lot of those work hours, but in the summer, there is a scramble to keep those kids busy.

    And in Shelby County, there are numerous programs designed to keep keeping children and teens busy and parents worry free.

  • Maybe word about all that chili that Simpsonville City Clerk Debbie Batliner has cooked for Light Up Simpsonville celebrations has made its way around the state.

    Batliner’s all-day cooking has fed thousands of residents during the past decade, but that is only exemplary of the long and lavish list of accomplishments that earned her the 2012 Clerk of the Clerks award from the Kentucky Municipal Clerks Association. The honor, presented in April, was announced last week by the KMCA.

  • A miniseries about Kentucky’s infamous Hatfields and McCoy feud isn’t just theater to one Shelby County couple.

    The series, which has attracted about 17 million viewers since its debut on the History Channel on Memorial Day, has been of peculiar interest to Shelbyville’s Boyd and Susie Phillips, who are both are descendants of the McCoy family.

  • It’s been 10 months since 22-year-old Savannah Sanders headed out to Arizona to have a procedure that she hoped would restore her eyesight.

    The trip was made possible by a community-wide fundraiser attended by hundreds of people last summer at the Shelby County Park Amphitheater, which included 12 bands, face painting, a karaoke contest, a silent and live auction, bake sale, bounce houses, food vendors, and dozens of volunteers.

    Now, nearing a year later, Sanders still has not regained her eyesight or had much improvement in that regard.

  • More than 200 people braved the 90-degrees-plus temperatures Monday to attend the Memorial Day service at Grove Hill Cemetery.

    The crowd proved the spirit of patriotism is still alive and well as they gathered under tents, trees and even stood in the boiling sun to hear speakers, sing stirring songs and listen to the melancholy dirge of bagpipes and the solemn notes of “Taps.”

    After a walking tour of the cemetery hosted by Friends of Grove Hill, led by historian Mike Harrod, the crowd gathered outside the chapel for the service.

  • Kei Ishikawa, a full-time paramedic at Shelby County EMS since 2003, has been named the county’s paramedic of the year.

    He was honored last week at the Frankfort regional meeting as part of National Emergency Services Week.

    “They pick one person from each county,” Ishikawa said.

    He said he knew he had been nominated but did not know he had won the award until he got to the awards dinner. “I was surprised,” he said.

  • An act of unselfish heroism has not gone unrecognized for a Shelbyville paramedic who made the difference between life and death for another man last year.

    Shelbyville resident Eddie Whitworth, a part-time paramedic at Shelby County EMS and also a Kentucky State Trooper assigned to Post 12, on May 12 received the Lifesaving Medal at KSP’s annual Officer Awards banquet in at the Capitol Plaza in Frankfort.

  • “Happiness is…. a warm blanket,” the Peanutscharacter Linus proclaims. Who better to make such a claim than the lovable boy who seldom is seen without his blanket?

    Shelbyville resident Becky Jew must understand, because she is trying to bring happiness, or at least comfort, to children in Shelby Country through the gift of homemade blankets.

  • Two people, one a Shelbyville resident and one a former resident, have been recognized this spring by their respective universities, Darla Bailey at Baylor University and Ben Pollard at Purdue University.

    Bailey, a Shelbyville resident, was named Honorary Alumna of the Year at Baylor’s School of Social Work in Waco, Texas.

    Pollard, a former resident of Shelby County who now lives of Poway, Calif., received an honorary doctorate degree during spring commencement ceremonies at Purdue’s campus in West Lafayette, Ind.

  • WHAT: Free health screenings for men
    WHEN:
    8 a.m.-noon, June 9
    WHERE:
    Jewish Hospital Shelbyville
    APPOINTMENTS:
    They are encouraged band can be made by calling  502-647-4000.
    OTHER:
    Drop-in visits also are welcome.
    MORE INFORMATION:
    Call 502-647-4000

     

    By Beth Herrinton-Hodge
    Sentinel-News Correspondent

  • The sun may have been fickle in Bagdad on Saturday, but the smiles on the faces of those who attended the town's 20th anniversary festival lit up the day all over the small community.

  • This article is for readers who have a loved one who refuses to follow doctor’s orders for recovery from a medical problem. It assumes you have read first the article I wrote for your loved one, “Are You in Defiance of Medical Compliance?”

    And like that first piece, if you read the rest of this article and get turned off, I hope you will at least have the courage and wisdom to ask yourself the two questions in the last paragraph.

  • Did you ever wonder what it would be like to be a firefighter?
    Now you can find out without having to undergo any training at all.

    The Firefighter for a Day program, held by the Shelbyville Fire Department, will take place July 14, and will allow participants to come as close to experiencing a real firefighting experience as possible.

  • The Shelbyville Department of Public Works is going native with its facility, and it needs the public’s help.

    Starting today, Public Works will be planting more than 1,800 native plants in its new rain garden, bioretention treatment basin and constructed wetlands area at its facility at 787 Kentucky St.

    The new features are part of the department’s efforts to clean the stormwater runoff from its own property and to educate the public as part of the EPA’s Municipal Separate Stormwater Sewer Systems (MS4) program.

  • Has your doctor told you that you are making yourself sick, that your pain or disability will continue to get worse until you change your lifestyle? Perhaps you have had trouble complying with doctor’s orders about alcohol, cigarettes, street drugs, prescription pills, physical therapy, losing weight, getting exercise, eating a balanced diet, or changing your high-stress lifestyle.

    If you read the rest of this article and get turned off, I hope you will at least have the courage and wisdom to ask yourself the question at the end of this article.