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Today's Opinions

  • WHAT WE THINK: Holiday gifts can be about more than what's in the box

    With the turkey, cranberries and pumpkin pie all washed down and leftovers dwindling, we can fully turn our attention to the Christmas season.

    However, those of you shopping for gifts have likely already gotten underway with your holiday favorites of Gray Thursday, Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and, of course, Cyber Monday – if we are not careful, we’re going to run out of days.

    But let’s stop for a second and look back over those days of consumerism, and think about our one special day that is tucked there in the middle.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Holiday gifts can be about more than what's in the box

    With the turkey, cranberries and pumpkin pie all washed down and leftovers dwindling, we can fully turn our attention to the Christmas season.

    However, those of you shopping for gifts have likely already gotten underway with your holiday favorites of Gray Thursday, Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and, of course, Cyber Monday – if we are not careful, we’re going to run out of days.

    But let’s stop for a second and look back over those days of consumerism, and think about our one special day that is tucked there in the middle.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Sam Eyle’s lasting impact on charity

    Last week Sam Eyle unceremoniously stepped down as the director of the Serenity Center, but we certainly think more should have been done.

    Mr. Eyle grew the Serenity Center from a somewhat unknown small counseling center at Shelby Christian Church to the area’s premier food bank, which still offers counseling.

    He oversaw the center’s move and revitalization of rundown building on Frankfort Road and then three years later to the former Emergency Management Building on 7th Street, where it really blossomed into the major player it is today.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Sam Eyle’s lasting impact on charity

    Last week Sam Eyle unceremoniously stepped down as the director of the Serenity Center, but we certainly think more should have been done.

    Mr. Eyle grew the Serenity Center from a somewhat unknown small counseling center at Shelby Christian Church to the area’s premier food bank, which still offers counseling.

    He oversaw the center’s move and revitalization of rundown building on Frankfort Road and then three years later to the former Emergency Management Building on 7th Street, where it really blossomed into the major player it is today.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Restaurant tax is delicious for Shelbyville

    It sounds like the Shelbyville City Council is ready to eat, much like the Simpsonville City Commission did not long ago.

    The council passed on first reading an ordinance that would create a 3 percent restaurant tax, but don’t assume it’s only at restaurants.

    The tax is an added line item on restaurant bills, so it doesn’t affect the prices. It also includes anything that isn’t prepackaged – so fountain drinks at gas stations, lunch counters, etc.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Restaurant tax is delicious for Shelbyville

    It sounds like the Shelbyville City Council is ready to eat, much like the Simpsonville City Commission did not long ago.

    The council passed on first reading an ordinance that would create a 3 percent restaurant tax, but don’t assume it’s only at restaurants.

    The tax is an added line item on restaurant bills, so it doesn’t affect the prices. It also includes anything that isn’t prepackaged – so fountain drinks at gas stations, lunch counters, etc.

  • MY WORD: A good guy is out of the lineup

    On a typical afternoon in 2013, I was sitting in my office as editor of The Sentinel-News when I was paged to the lobby, where I had “a visitor.” I arose and headed up front, expecting to be handed a photo of a large vegetable or prodigal grandchild or hear a scold from a would-be felon’s offspring.

    What I found was a face from my youth and a surge of warmth in my heart.

  • MY WORD: A good guy is out of the lineup

    On a typical afternoon in 2013, I was sitting in my office as editor of The Sentinel-News when I was paged to the lobby, where I had “a visitor.” I arose and headed up front, expecting to be handed a photo of a large vegetable or prodigal grandchild or hear a scold from a would-be felon’s offspring.

    What I found was a face from my youth and a surge of warmth in my heart.