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Today's Opinions

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Continuing the restaurant tax discussion

    While we are on the topic of congratulating the city, we cannot forget to offer praise for the council’s decision to continue to discuss the restaurant tax.

    With the announcement of a workshop on Thursday at 5:30 p.m. at city hall, 315 Washington Street, the council has, for the first time we are aware of, decided to discuss the 3 percent tax on food from restaurants and other sources.

    The tax doesn’t include packaged food, so groceries would not be included.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Continuing the restaurant tax discussion

    While we are on the topic of congratulating the city, we cannot forget to offer praise for the council’s decision to continue to discuss the restaurant tax.

    With the announcement of a workshop on Thursday at 5:30 p.m. at city hall, 315 Washington Street, the council has, for the first time we are aware of, decided to discuss the 3 percent tax on food from restaurants and other sources.

    The tax doesn’t include packaged food, so groceries would not be included.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Follow the state’s lead and revamp liquor laws

    For decades our commonwealth has been known for fast horses, basketball and Kentucky Straight Bourbon.

    With growing crowds, it doesn’t seem that the Kentucky Derby’s appeal will ever diminish. And the NCAA championship game has featured either the University of Louisville for Kentucky in each of the last three years, making it obvious that our state’s top universities in Lexington and Louisville have no intention of relinquishing our stranglehold on the country’s best hoops teams.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Follow the state’s lead and revamp liquor laws

    For decades our commonwealth has been known for fast horses, basketball and Kentucky Straight Bourbon.

    With growing crowds, it doesn’t seem that the Kentucky Derby’s appeal will ever diminish. And the NCAA championship game has featured either the University of Louisville for Kentucky in each of the last three years, making it obvious that our state’s top universities in Lexington and Louisville have no intention of relinquishing our stranglehold on the country’s best hoops teams.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: The House’s eye on our future

    The Kentucky House of Representatives was also hard at work last week on a bill that would ban smoking in all work places and indoor public places.

    There are a few exceptions, including cigar bars and private clubs, but for the most part the bill is fairly inclusive.

    We applaud the House for approving the bill. This is the first time such sweeping legislation has been approved in either chamber of the Kentucky legislature, and we believe it is an integral first step.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: The House’s eye on our future

    The Kentucky House of Representatives was also hard at work last week on a bill that would ban smoking in all work places and indoor public places.

    There are a few exceptions, including cigar bars and private clubs, but for the most part the bill is fairly inclusive.

    We applaud the House for approving the bill. This is the first time such sweeping legislation has been approved in either chamber of the Kentucky legislature, and we believe it is an integral first step.

  • LEGISLATIVE OUTLOOK: Flurry of bills pass House on week 3 of session

    FRANKFORT - The 2015 session of the Kentucky General Assembly is nearing the halfway point and with few days left to take up legislation, a flurry of key bills passed in the House this past week.
    As I anticipated in last week’s column, both the proposal to raise the states minimum wage, HB2, and the bill to implement a state wide smoking ban, HB145, were voted on and passed by the full House.  These bills are now in the Senate where I expect they will receive a less than warm reception.  

  • MY WORD: Understanding our fight with terrorism

    The number of civilian employees in the U.S. Department of Defense has grown by 7 percent since 2009, while the number military personal has declined by 8 percent.

    If we get into a war armed only with pencils we will surely win by force of numbers – 750,000 of them and counting. Even the military has been ceded to the bureaucrats. These are pencil pushers who haven’t a clue to the difference between a strategy and a tactic. Add to this all the improvements in armament, which have been scrapped plus exploding increase in terrorist worldwide it really gets scary.