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Today's Opinions

  • Two shining examples from which we all can learn

    These are sad days. Loss and grief are everywhere.

    People die every day and every week, of course, some more famous than others, and each of you is touched in a unique way by the passing of someone you know, someone you’ve loved or maybe just someone you’ve admired.

    This past year has been personally difficult. Our family lost a very dear relative all too quickly, and our grief continues. Friends and former classmates and teammates passed away suddenly. Friends and acquaintances have lost spouses and children. And of course many have lost parents.

  • We congratulate: SCHS for efforts to recognize stars

    Shelby County High School's raising of banners to honor two of its greatest sports stars is perhaps too little but mercifully not too late.

    Mike Casey and Terry Davis were the state's top basketball players in perhaps what was the best and most competitive era of the sport in this state and certainly in this county.

    Mr. Casey, an iconic legend in Shelby County sports, led the school to its first state championship in 1966. He went on to star at the University of Kentucky.

  • What we think: Fireworks show should go on

    What great news it was when we learned that the fireworks show will continue.

    We were afraid there would be no more sizzle in the sky to celebrate Independence Day in Shelby County.

    The county’s parks board, which for many years has produced the fireworks display at Clear Creek Park on July 4, said last week it no longer could afford to light the fuse, and unless a benefactor were to step forward, the community would be left with a dud.

  • Sometimes God has to get our attention

    I was recently reminded of the old story about the farmer who sold a mule, telling the buyer that the animal would do anything as long as he was asked nicely.  The next day, the buyer returned and shared a tale of frustration because the stubborn mule would not do a thing – no matter how many times he was asked nicely.

    Upon hearing this report, the farmer picked up a wooden 2-by-4 that was leaning against his barn, walked right up to the mule and hit the unsuspecting animal square in the head.  Then he whispered, "Please pull that plow."&n

  • What we think: SCHS decision needed input

     

    Is it just us or does this decision at Shelby County High School to go to a trimester structure starting next year seem a bit rushed?

    We learned – though we don’t exactly understand – that this decision by SCHS’s site-based decision-making council is binding and does not require approval by the school board.

  • Looking for heroes? You don’t have to look long or far

    The scenes last week were incredible, weren’t they? You could see both overwhelming beauty and bedeviling frustration in one quick glance.

    Mother Nature painted our canvas with brush strokes of divine precision, a pure white base topped with a sheen of silvery ice followed by an icing of more snow to create a crunchy and even inviting layer cake on our lawns and meadows.

    Our trees were a winter wonderland, with gleaming tinsel and long and sophisticated boughs of ice dangling every which way.

  • Snow days used to be some of the good old days

    When did snow days change from magical gifts from Mother Nature to pains in our eternal backsides?

    I think it was somewhere between youth and adulthood, to be sure, but when exactly did that change occur?

    I’ve been away a long time, you know, and though we had hurricane days in Florida, those didn’t have the same charm that snow days brought.

    I mean, kids stayed home from school, but they also spent the time removing tree limbs, living without power and maybe cleaning up a flooded mess. Or worse. It wasn’t fun at all.

  • What we think: Mail missed routes during storm

    “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.”

    You probably know these words and believe them to be the official Postal Creed, the motto of the United States Post Office.

    They are not that.

    The USPS has no official motto, though this sentence, whose origins are attributed to Persian history, is inscribed in the post office in New York City.

    Still, it often is cited by citizens and embraced as a standard for their expectations.