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Today's Opinions

  • What we think: Don't confuse a civic center with a convention center

    We read with interest the ideas and the follow-up discussions about the need for new conference space in Shelby County. We have said before and continue to believe that such space is needed.

    But we don’t think all of us are discussing the same sort of facility.

    What this community needs – and should be pursuing – is a civic center, a building that can hold the coveted meetings among visitors while also serving as a central gathering venue for the largest and most important functions in Shelby County.

  • Yesterday, when I was young

    I’ve heard it said that you know you are getting older when your former classmates are so gray and wrinkled and bald that they no longer recognize you.  Perhaps you can identify. 

    I was thinking about things along those lines because this weekend I will be celebrating my birthday.  OK, perhaps “celebrating” is a little strong.  More accurately, this weekend I will be observing my birthday. 

  • We congratulate: School board for its new plan

    The Shelby County School Board approved that new concept for the new Martha Layne Collins Secondary Center, and we are glad they did.

    Whether this is the best decision for the students of Shelby County and the use of land and appropriation of dollars that are ongoing will remain to be seen, but we congratulate the board in finally reaching a decision that everyone seems to have embraced.

  • What we think: Talks at Martinrea are getting tiresome

    Is it just us, or does all this posturing, finger-pointing and name-calling at Martinrea Heavy Stamping seem to be both inappropriate and tiresome?

    The United Auto Workers and company management continue their spat about a new contract, and sometimes it seems that the games they are playing are more the stuff of the Disney Channel than CNBC.

    Let’s be clear about one thing: We’re not taking sides on whether contract offers have been adequate or the process fair. We don’t know enough details about either to make such a value judgment.

  • We’ve lost an extraordinary guy with extraordinary talent

    When I was a kid, the hayloft of our big dairy barn became a recreation center for kids from miles around. Day and night for almost any month of the year, boys would flock there to play basketball on the half court of hardwood I had meticulously kept cleared of that pesky hay.

    We even called the place the Cow Palace, but not because it resembled that famed arena in San Francisco.

  • A day to celebrate dishonesty is no kidding matter

     Does it seem strange to you that we devote one day a year to bring attention to the art of lying?

    We try to hold ourselves and each other accountable for honesty and fairness for 364 or 365 days a year, but on April 1 we make a sport of playing pranks, misleading our neighbors and trying to render our friends and families as, well, fools.

  • Bill changes the future of assessment

    Assessments and accountability have been two words synonymous with the Kentucky Education Reform Act that was passed in 1990. That legislation put our state – and our school system – years ahead of others in determining what students should learn and how students are measured on what they were taught.

  • Why doesn’t Easter get the respect it deserves?

    I was singing that beloved Easter ditty “Here Comes Peter Cottontail” to my 2-year-old daughter the other day. She thought it was just great, especially when I inserted her and her brother’s names into the lyrics, and she sang along in much better key than mine.

    As I listened to her, I realized that this was one of the few Easter songs I even knew. We had to repeat it to keep going. There was no Bing Crosby CD to mimic. This was it for a 2-year-old.