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Today's Opinions

  • We know what Santa can bring to us next year

    Twas the night before Christmas, and all through the county,

    Not a creature was stirring, lest it become a hunter’s bounty.

    The stockings may be hung, but who really cared?

    Our visions of Harley had vanished into thin air.

     

    The children were indeed all snug in their beds.

  • My Word: This soldier has been there and sees 3 ways U.S. could lose in Afghanistan

    From one retired military officer’s perspective, here are three easy steps for the United States to lose in Afghanistan.

    Step One: Assume that the conflict in Afghanistan is its own war and not part of a larger global or world war.

    • When was the last time you heard the term Global War on Terror? We now simply deploy soldiers on “contingency operations.”

  • Is UK-U of L really a rivalry in football?

     A friend recently gave me a new cap as a welcome-back-to-Kentucky present.

  • Among all the presents remember the Christmas presence

    For many people – and certainly for my children – Christmas is all about the presents.

    It was no different for me when I was their age. I fully remember going to bed on Christmas Eve in anxious anticipation of waking early to discover what treasures Santa had left.

  • A man of the cloth who was from a different fabric

    The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville and Shelby County have a unique, symbiotic relationship. For 150 years now, the seminary has been turning out ministers, and for probably just as long, those young preachers have been practicing their sermons at many of Shelby County’s churches.

    In the Lord’s Army, these are buck privates, men studying their calling on weekdays and trying out what they learned at nights and on weekends. They stay a few years until they graduate, and then the Lord moves them in unusual ways.

  • Coaches teach us tough lessons, and some pay the ultimate

    The tragic intersection of the fates of Jason Stinson and Max Gilpin has occurred too many times on the roads traveled by coaches and players.

    Stinson, a football coach Pleasure Ridge Park High School, was doing what he knew it would take to build strength and character, and Gilpin, a young player, only was trying to have his built.

    Both of them pushed, and, sadly, one pushed too hard.

  • You complain about this, and you’re just an old so-and-so

    You learned it in grade school. You said it from time to time to time. Too bad you didn’t absorb it.

    I’m rubber, and you’re glue. What you say bounces off me and sticks to you.

    Wouldn’t it be so much better in the world if that were true for all of us, if the worrisome words we heard just bounced off and went right back to the source to be absorbed anew, carrying with them a lesson of truth and humanity for all of us?

  • What we think: Commission must operate in sunshine

    Attorney General Jack Conway’s ruling last week that Triple S Planning & Zoning Commission had operated in violation of the state’s open-meetings law is a troubling revelation.

    Disputes about meetings and public notifications are routine. Journalists and special-interest groups keep watch, and they sometimes blow the whistle about whether the law is being followed.