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Today's Opinions

  • In this hot matchup, everyone was a winner

    This was a scene worthy of every clichéyou’ve ever read. Every trite phrase to define tension, intensity and personal fortitude was pulsing through the atmosphere. Every syllable of coach-speak echoed silently from the corners.

    Two teams confronted one another over the scant space of a yard or two, coaches tensely watching nearby, fans crammed into the standing-room-only swelter of a small venue.

  • What we think: Questions abound about Hornback’s bill

    Paul Hornback is in his second full year of representing Shelby County in the state Senate, and he is starting to step into the sometimes squishy purchase of both political position and important decision.
    He also will begin to see that those processes will begin to erode his legislative honeymoon with his constituents, depending upon their perspectives.

  • What we think: We need to know about T.S. Baxter

    Were you as amazed as we were to read the story of Thomas Samuel “T.S.” Baxter, the first African-American elected to Shelbyville City Council, where he served for almost two decades before being gerrymandered out of his seat because of his race?

    We discovered Mr. Baxter as a small photograph in Portrait of the Past, Shelby County Kentucky 1865-1980. In fact, the caption beneath his photograph was the only clue we had to the story of T.S. Baxter.

  • In this hot matchup, everyone was a winner

    This was a scene worthy of every clichéyou’ve ever read. Every trite phrase to define tension, intensity and personal fortitude was pulsing through the atmosphere. Every syllable of coach-speak echoed silently from the corners.

    Two teams confronted one another over the scant space of a yard or two, coaches tensely watching nearby, fans crammed into the standing-room-only swelter of a small venue.

  • What we think: Questions abound about Hornback’s bill

    Paul Hornback is in his second full year of representing Shelby County in the state Senate, and he is starting to step into the sometimes squishy purchase of both political position and important decision.
    He also will begin to see that those processes will begin to erode his legislative honeymoon with his constituents, depending upon their perspectives.

  • What we think: We need to know about T.S. Baxter

    Were you as amazed as we were to read the story of Thomas Samuel “T.S.” Baxter, the first African-American elected to Shelbyville City Council, where he served for almost two decades before being gerrymandered out of his seat because of his race?

    We discovered Mr. Baxter as a small photograph in Portrait of the Past, Shelby County Kentucky 1865-1980. In fact, the caption beneath his photograph was the only clue we had to the story of T.S. Baxter.

  • MY WORD: Here's a needed lesson in the art of tattooing

    Steve Doyle seems to be very poorly educated on the art of tattooing ("On Valentine's Day, no love loss for tattooing," Feb. 15). I am going to try my best to inform him without offending him, a quality he would be well advised to inherit (oops, there I go already).

  • MY WORD: Let’s review options before investing in statue of Boone

    I have been interested for some time in Joe Ruble’s proposal to erect a statue in east end Shelbyville to counterbalance the beautiful horse statue in front of the fairgrounds (“Help us to honor Squire Boone,” Feb. 22). While I have some reservations about the need for such a status, I think Mr. Ruble has picked the wrong man.

    The fact that he is distantly related to Squire would seem to me to be a conflict of interest. But that is beside the point; if we’re going to have a statue, Mr. Ruble is entitled to make the case for his candidate.