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Today's Opinions

  • MY WORD: Let's get our government's attention

    Could someone please explain to me what is going on in this country? America has got it backwards. It is not the people who offer only their opinion and sit behind a desk and make decisions that make this country great. It is the people who have produced everything you see and use that make this country great.

  • MY WORD: New academic policies at confict

    The graduating class of Collins High School learned this week that all graduates will be seated in alphabetical order, breaking the longstanding Shelby County tradition of honoring the top-ranked graduates by seating them on the front rows at graduation. I am writing to lament the way our schools have watered down the recognition of students who excel in academics.

  • What we think: Criminal penalties seem too lenient

    We are starting to wonder if there are any cells available in our state prisons, because we are becoming increasingly alarmed at high-profile crimes that are going unpunished by incarceration.
    This is said neither to renew our shock at the meager wrist slapping given to admitted office thief Jody Wills nor to condemn any particular judge for his or her rulings.
    But rather this is a focus on the crime-and-punishment system, because there are examples it’s not working like we would expect it to work.

  • We congratulate: Kentucky's basketball success stories

    No matter which colors dominate your wardrobe or tint your vision of the sports world, surely you can embrace the success stories that our state generated on the basketball court this past weekend.
    Chatter is everywhere, of course, about the University of Kentucky’s first return to the NCAA Tournament’s Final Four since the Clinton Administration. The Wildcats’ run has been remarkable and somewhat unexpected by anyone other than the deepest blue fans.

  • A familiar face in the story of Jesus

    I was walking through the lobby of Southeast Christian Church on Friday night when a character from the Bible called out my name.
    And let me say up front that when you are surrounded by disciples of Jesus himself, you pause and wonder if hearing your name isn’t taking on a bit more significance.
    So it was that I turned and looked into a face I barely recognized because of the incredible makeup and costume this man wore.

  • What we think: Criminal penalties seem too lenient

    We are starting to wonder if there are any cells available in our state prisons, because we are becoming increasingly alarmed at high-profile crimes that are going unpunished by incarceration.
    This is said neither to renew our shock at the meager wrist slapping given to admitted office thief Jody Wills nor to condemn any particular judge for his or her rulings.
    But rather this is a focus on the crime-and-punishment system, because there are examples it’s not working like we would expect it to work.

  • We congratulate: Kentucky's basketball success stories

    No matter which colors dominate your wardrobe or tint your vision of the sports world, surely you can embrace the success stories that our state generated on the basketball court this past weekend.
    Chatter is everywhere, of course, about the University of Kentucky’s first return to the NCAA Tournament’s Final Four since the Clinton Administration. The Wildcats’ run has been remarkable and somewhat unexpected by anyone other than the deepest blue fans.

  • What we think: Census figures show what we already knew

    By now you have read the description of the new statistical face of Shelby County as drawn by the 2010 census. We doubt you were surprised any more than we were about what this analysis discerned about our community.
    To understand that Shelby County has seen burgeoning growth in the past decade – 38 percent more residents than in 2000 – doesn’t require a degree in statistics or even a detailed market analysis.
    We’ve seen the growth just by driving around our communities.