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Today's Opinions

  • MY WORD: 10 reasons why the commandments should come down

    I wholeheartedly support Linda Allewalt in her efforts concerning removal of the Ten Commandments from the walls of Shelbyville’s government buildings (“Ten Commandments must come down,” April 20).

    I don't understand the reluctance in taking it down – unless it's a daily reminder to the religious government employees who might forget? Let's go through the list itself as it

    might apply to a government building:

  • When it comes to our weather, it’s hard to get the picture

    Wednesday. 12:30 a.m. The tornado sirens are blaring through the wind and rain outside and windows closed against them. My wife’s voice is equally rousing, and I spring from my bed to see what is the matter.

    We grabbed up the kids and scurried to the basement, opened the door slightly and turned on the TV to track whatever mayhem was causing those sirens to blare.

    I’m sure many of you did the same, alerted, awakened and ambulated into early morning emergency response mode.

  • Letters to the Editor, April 27, 2011

    Much-needed

    attention

    Linda Allewalt calls much-needed attention (“Ten Commandments need to come down,” April 20) to the illegal and discriminatory posting of religious doctrine in Shelby County government offices.

  • What we think: We must fund I-64 ramp repair

    You had to be pleased and heartened by the news that the frighteningly short and deadly ramp from KY 55 onto eastbound Interstate 64 was on tap for repair within the next year.

    That’s what state transportation engineer Matt Bullock told Shelby County Fiscal Court, and we believe Mr. Bullock would not have been so public with his comments if the schedule were not indeed set in at least asphalt.

  • We congratulate: Circuit Court Clerk Lowry Miller's decision about Ten Commandments

    The debate about whether the Ten Commandments should be displayed in governmental buildings is predictable because of its foundation in the conflict of human emotions and beliefs against legal interpretations by the courts.

    When letter writer Linda Allewalt last week again raised the issue about whether the commandments should be posted visibly in government offices in Shelby County, the response from many was equally expected: We believe in these commandments, and they are the foundation for our laws. Thus, they should be displayed.

  • A taxing process that really should be laid to rest

    So you think the weather was nasty and no one showed up for your big event? This is how my weekend went:

    An emotional funeral for a beloved family member on Friday, then at my desk at home on Saturday and Sunday, bleeding on the tax altar.

    Please don’t tell me you’re sorry for my loss, but that the tax stuff was my problem for procrastinating. I’ve heard that. I understand. I didn’t mean for the process to be that way, but it just spiraled down that drain.

  • MY WORD: It’s time for the Ten Commandments display to come down

    Nine years ago, as a newcomer to the state of Kentucky and a new resident of Shelbyville, I went to the Shelby County Courthouse to get a Kentucky driver’s license. On the wall of that office was a large standalone framed display of the Ten Commandments.

    To understand my reaction to seeing this, one must take the view of 1) a person who is non-religious and 2) a person who had at that time a budding awareness of issues of separation of church and state.

  • NEIHOF: Graduation still is about recognition

    Seniors at both high schools are in the final stretch before receiving their diplomas. Excitement is high this year, too, because of some changes that will honor more students – at home.

    Both commencement exercises will take place in the individual school gyms with overflow seating with a live broadcast in the school theaters. This arrangement is made possible because of the reduced number in the graduating class because of the two high schools.

    The celebrations can now occur at home, rather than at the Frankfort convention center.