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Today's Opinions

  • A memory of a buried March that is not buried by time

    Spring fever is supposed to arrive early in March, when you see the first robin, the bright yellow of an occasional daffodil, things green, abud and, well, warming.

    Spring fever is not supposed to be a full-blown summer sweat at the strike of the vernal equinox.

    It’s not as if there isn’t always plenty to talk about with basketball, politics, religion, economics, basketball, politics and, I don’t know, movies, but today we have to talk about the weather, because everyone is.

  • NEIHOF: New grading system up for discussion

    “Grading procedures do not reflect today’s teaching standards,” said Thomas R. Guskey from the University of Kentucky at a recent training session for principals in Shelby County. He could prove his point with a 1917 report card that belonged to his grandmother, which looked pretty much like a report card issued today.

    He and Lee Ann Jung, also from UK, shared their expertise in standards-based grading for Shelby County Public Schools because we have completed a study of their book, Grading Exceptional and Struggling Learners.

  • What we think: A great new idea for downtown

    Robert Burry had a vision, and Bob Andriot saw it clearly, a vision that holds beautiful hope for downtown Shelbyville.

    Mr. Andriot, a lifelong downtown businessman and property owner, and Mr. Burry, an architect, builder and restoration dreamer, have joined forces with a concept to transform one of the downtown’s most undesirable but historic eyesores, the Blue Gables, from a seedy rental property into something of vibrancy and potential.

  • We congratulate: Sen. Hornback did the right thing

    State Sen. Paul Hornback got it right, and he deserves our applause.

    Whether or not you think Sen. Hornback’s telecommunications deregulation bill – dubbed the “AT&T bill” in the corridors of his state Senate – was a good thing or a bad thing is not the issue here.

    What Sen. Hornback (R-Shelbyville) did that so many don’t do is this: He listened.

    He withdrew his bill on Thursday, and his reason for so doing was prime goodness: He said there was a public outcry against the bill.

  • A memory of a buried March that is not buried by time

    Spring fever is supposed to arrive early in March, when you see the first robin, the bright yellow of an occasional daffodil, things green, abud and, well, warming.

    Spring fever is not supposed to be a full-blown summer sweat at the strike of the vernal equinox.

    It’s not as if there isn’t always plenty to talk about with basketball, politics, religion, economics, basketball, politics and, I don’t know, movies, but today we have to talk about the weather, because everyone is.

  • What we think: A great new idea for downtown

    Robert Burry had a vision, and Bob Andriot saw it clearly, a vision that holds beautiful hope for downtown Shelbyville.

    Mr. Andriot, a lifelong downtown businessman and property owner, and Mr. Burry, an architect, builder and restoration dreamer, have joined forces with a concept to transform one of the downtown’s most undesirable but historic eyesores, the Blue Gables, from a seedy rental property into something of vibrancy and potential.

  • We congratulate: Sen. Hornback did the right thing

    State Sen. Paul Hornback got it right, and he deserves our applause.

    Whether or not you think Sen. Hornback’s telecommunications deregulation bill – dubbed the “AT&T bill” in the corridors of his state Senate – was a good thing or a bad thing is not the issue here.

    What Sen. Hornback (R-Shelbyville) did that so many don’t do is this: He listened.

    He withdrew his bill on Thursday, and his reason for so doing was prime goodness: He said there was a public outcry against the bill.

  • The sweet madness of March lies mostly in the brackets

    A few weeks ago, I explained to my 10-year-old son how brackets work. I showed him the elimination process, how the winners moved one way and the losers another. I think he was more intrigued by the maze of lines than what they actually represented.

    And so today I give you the NCAA Tournament, basketball’s version of a maze in which good teams get lost when their names fall on bad lines.