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Today's Opinions

  • What we think: Triple S acted according to plan

    There was no close vote or public hemming and hawing in the most recent big decision made by the Triple S Planning Commission: Commissioners voted unanimously to deny the City of Shelbyville’s request to rezone 73 acres on the corner of Harrington Mill Road and Freedom’s Way from agriculture to light industrial.

  • We congratulate: Readiness rates of our students

    We feel a little like a student in a statistics class because of the avalanche of data about the performance and progress of Shelby County’s Public School students that has covered our heads this past week.

    To be able to digest the reports from the state’s about-to-be-dead KCCT tests, the federal governments’ trying-to-be-dead No Child Left Behind and the new buzzword of development – college and career readiness – is overwhelming to just about anyone who doesn’t get paid to spend full days evaluating what the numbers say.

  • The story of a horrible crime that just had to be explained

    You may be wondering what the heck has been going on with your newspaper these past few days.
    You may not care that Tonya Nicole Brown went into a restroom in Shelbyville more than three years ago and left behind her newborn baby, wrapped in plastic bags and dumped in a trashcan.
    You may not care that she is out of jail, barely paying for a crime to which she admitted in a court plea.
    But we, as a newspaper, had to tell you, and we hope you did pay attention and that deep down you really care.

  • What we think: Shouldn’t we all be outraged?

    Earlier this summer, a woman named Casey Anthony went on trial under the glaring lights of national TV, charged with murdering her 4-year-old daughter and covering up that crime.

    She became a national lightning rod, a source of vile hate, a person castigated in the streets even when a court found her not guilty of those charges, for which she could have faced the death penalty.

    A tragedy had occurred in the death of Caylee Anthony, to be sure, and it brought with it pure outrage among those who thought the guilty person was getting away with murder.

  • What we think: Shouldn’t we all be outraged?

    Earlier this summer, a woman named Casey Anthony went on trial under the glaring lights of national TV, charged with murdering her 4-year-old daughter and covering up that crime.

    She became a national lightning rod, a source of vile hate, a person castigated in the streets even when a court found her not guilty of those charges, for which she could have faced the death penalty.

    A tragedy had occurred in the death of Caylee Anthony, to be sure, and it brought with it pure outrage among those who thought the guilty person was getting away with murder.

  • What we think: Shouldn’t we all be outraged?

    Earlier this summer, a woman named Casey Anthony went on trial under the glaring lights of national TV, charged with murdering her 4-year-old daughter and covering up that crime.

    She became a national lightning rod, a source of vile hate, a person castigated in the streets even when a court found her not guilty of those charges, for which she could have faced the death penalty.

    A tragedy had occurred in the death of Caylee Anthony, to be sure, and it brought with it pure outrage among those who thought the guilty person was getting away with murder.

  • The story of a horrible crime that just had to be explained

    You may be wondering what the heck has been going on with your newspaper these past few days.
    You may not care that Tonya Nicole Brown went into a restroom in Shelbyville more than three years ago and left behind her newborn baby, wrapped in plastic bags and dumped in a trashcan.
    You may not care that she is out of jail, barely paying for a crime to which she admitted in a court plea.
    But we, as a newspaper, had to tell you, and we hope you did pay attention and that deep down you really care.

  • What we think: Shouldn’t we all be outraged?

    Earlier this summer, a woman named Casey Anthony went on trial under the glaring lights of national TV, charged with murdering her 4-year-old daughter and covering up that crime.

    She became a national lightning rod, a source of vile hate, a person castigated in the streets even when a court found her not guilty of those charges, for which she could have faced the death penalty.

    A tragedy had occurred in the death of Caylee Anthony, to be sure, and it brought with it pure outrage among those who thought the guilty person was getting away with murder.