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Today's Opinions

  • What we think: Farm equipment must share, too

    Every planting and harvest season, when farm equipment is being moved so frequently from one field to another, from one property to another, there goes out a request to motorists to beware of the machinery and to share the road with care.

    We think that’s a good idea, to understand the needs of the agricultural corners of our community, to show patience and consideration.

    We also think that consideration should go both ways.

  • We congratulate: Blue-ribbon fair needs all our focus

    The 150th celebration of the Shelby County Fair has concluded, and we want to present the Shelby County A&M Association with a blue ribbon for this year’s event.

    Fair Board President Ray Tucker and his army of volunteers and mercenaries did their dead-level best to make this show the biggest and best and most customer friendly as they possibly could. Their effort was evident from the midway, to the tractor-pull site to special events.

  • Letters to the Editor, June 20, 2012

    Flag Day trivia


    When the United States was first created, our flag had 13 starts and 13 stripes. After the admission of Vermont and Kentucky, a resolution was adopted on Jan. 1, 1794, making a new flag with 15 starts and 15 stripes.

    The flag then looked like this.

  • A life may have ended, but a legacy continue

    There is a sesne today that I shouldn’t be here. I should be in the suburbs of Denver, helping to lay to rest a man who in many ways made me whatever success I have been in this world, a man I call friend.
    Just a week ago, Tom Patterson lay quietly in an ICU in California, tubes and machines breathing for him. Breathing long had been Tom’s downfall, brought on by a 15-year battle with a lung-eating disease called scleroderma.

  • What we think: Coal support resolution was a waste of time

    We found it curious last week when Shelby County Fiscal Court took meeting time and office time to develop, distribute and pass a resolution supporting the coal industry in Kentucky and decrying strict enforcement of regulations by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    We don’t have a problem supporting an industry that is at the core of the economy in parts of Kentucky and contributes heavily to state tax coffers.

    We just wonder why it’s a matter of business for the citizens of Shelby County, because coal is hardly a big entity here.

  • We congratulate: Creators of sensational idea

    Sometime over the years the Shelby County Fair evolved into a pageant of pageants.

    What began in 1842 as a celebration of farm life and livestock has evolved in 2012 to be a celebration of our children on display like a lot of that livestock, and we venture there are more of the former than the latter entered at the fair.

    What for decades was a baby show and a beauty contest for young women now has expanded into a days-long, multi-age-group competition among girls and boys, which would beg the question about whether we have taken this too far.

  • A life may have ended, but a legacy continue

    There is a sesne today that I shouldn’t be here. I should be in the suburbs of Denver, helping to lay to rest a man who in many ways made me whatever success I have been in this world, a man I call friend.
    Just a week ago, Tom Patterson lay quietly in an ICU in California, tubes and machines breathing for him. Breathing long had been Tom’s downfall, brought on by a 15-year battle with a lung-eating disease called scleroderma.

  • What we think: Coal support resolution was a waste of time

    We found it curious last week when Shelby County Fiscal Court took meeting time and office time to develop, distribute and pass a resolution supporting the coal industry in Kentucky and decrying strict enforcement of regulations by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    We don’t have a problem supporting an industry that is at the core of the economy in parts of Kentucky and contributes heavily to state tax coffers.

    We just wonder why it’s a matter of business for the citizens of Shelby County, because coal is hardly a big entity here.