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Today's Opinions

  • What we think: Coal support resolution was a waste of time

    We found it curious last week when Shelby County Fiscal Court took meeting time and office time to develop, distribute and pass a resolution supporting the coal industry in Kentucky and decrying strict enforcement of regulations by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    We don’t have a problem supporting an industry that is at the core of the economy in parts of Kentucky and contributes heavily to state tax coffers.

    We just wonder why it’s a matter of business for the citizens of Shelby County, because coal is hardly a big entity here.

  • We congratulate: Creators of sensational idea

    Sometime over the years the Shelby County Fair evolved into a pageant of pageants.

    What began in 1842 as a celebration of farm life and livestock has evolved in 2012 to be a celebration of our children on display like a lot of that livestock, and we venture there are more of the former than the latter entered at the fair.

    What for decades was a baby show and a beauty contest for young women now has expanded into a days-long, multi-age-group competition among girls and boys, which would beg the question about whether we have taken this too far.

  • A life may have ended, but a legacy continue

    There is a sesne today that I shouldn’t be here. I should be in the suburbs of Denver, helping to lay to rest a man who in many ways made me whatever success I have been in this world, a man I call friend.
    Just a week ago, Tom Patterson lay quietly in an ICU in California, tubes and machines breathing for him. Breathing long had been Tom’s downfall, brought on by a 15-year battle with a lung-eating disease called scleroderma.

  • What we think: Coal support resolution was a waste of time

    We found it curious last week when Shelby County Fiscal Court took meeting time and office time to develop, distribute and pass a resolution supporting the coal industry in Kentucky and decrying strict enforcement of regulations by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    We don’t have a problem supporting an industry that is at the core of the economy in parts of Kentucky and contributes heavily to state tax coffers.

    We just wonder why it’s a matter of business for the citizens of Shelby County, because coal is hardly a big entity here.

  • We congratulate: Creators of sensational idea

    Sometime over the years the Shelby County Fair evolved into a pageant of pageants.

    What began in 1842 as a celebration of farm life and livestock has evolved in 2012 to be a celebration of our children on display like a lot of that livestock, and we venture there are more of the former than the latter entered at the fair.

    What for decades was a baby show and a beauty contest for young women now has expanded into a days-long, multi-age-group competition among girls and boys, which would beg the question about whether we have taken this too far.

  • NEIHOF: Goal-setting efforts paying off

    This BIG Goal was introduced to staff and students three years ago, a lofty goal with high expectations, intense monitoring, and consistent engagement.

    The focus never wavered. The hard work got harder. The efforts were never-ending.

    “Not all of my students are on grade level but by golly way more than the majority are,” is what Pam Pickens from Painted Stone Elementary said on the last day of school, June 4. “Setting that bar so high made us aim high, and it worked.”

  • MY WORD: For the ink-stained, this is wretched

    I was first paid for my writing when I was 13 years old. The Shelby Newsadvertised for "correspondents" to cover activities at the eight local junior high schools. Because the major activities were sports-related, a phone call and my immediate hiring became an introduction to the world of print journalism.

    It was the best call I ever made, not only because I would be paid the princely sum of 10 cents for every column inch of information I contributed, but it set me off on a career path that continues a half-century to this day.

  • SOUDER: Father’s Day is just like Mother’s Day, except smaller presents

    As I hope you are aware, this Sunday is Father’s Day. For whatever reason, as the title of today’s column suggests, Father’s Day seems to play second fiddle to Mother’s Day.

    Perhaps it is because, in many instances, moms play a bigger role in the child-rearing process. I once read an article describing differences between moms and dads, and one of the areas it highlighted was the knowledge about their children.