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Today's Opinions

  • WHAT WE THINK: We need to take care as we move forward with the city center

    Two of the first dominoes for a proposed downtown city center in Shelbyville fell on Thursday as Shelby County Public Schools joined the Ohio Valley Education Cooperative with a tentative financial commitment.

    The two groups are still waiting for financial commitments from the Shelbyville City Council, Shelby County Fiscal Court and Shelby County Industrial Foundation before they will move forward, but this is as close as we have been to seeing the concept become a reality.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Efforts to save owl from steeple are admirable

    Last week we all found out about a Great-horned Owl that was trapped in the steeple of Centenary United Methodist Church.

    It seems the owl was chasing a pigeon when it became trapped in the tower.

    Lucky for the great bird, the church was beginning a renovation project on the tower and the crew from Thoroughbred Contractors is a pretty honest and ethical group.

    The crew spotted the bird, made sure it had some food and water, and then called in a raptor rescue group to help get the beast out.

  • WE CONGRATULATE: Efforts to save owl from steeple are admirable

    Last week we all found out about a Great-horned Owl that was trapped in the steeple of Centenary United Methodist Church.

    It seems the owl was chasing a pigeon when it became trapped in the tower.

    Lucky for the great bird, the church was beginning a renovation project on the tower and the crew from Thoroughbred Contractors is a pretty honest and ethical group.

    The crew spotted the bird, made sure it had some food and water, and then called in a raptor rescue group to help get the beast out.

  • MY WORD: Letting private business continue on course

    I’ve heard local and state officials say – off the record, of course – the only thing Kentucky has going for it is cheap energy.

    The Alpha Natural Resources Co. says they may close 11 coal mines in West Virginia and lay off 1,100 workers. They found out they can ship coal by sea from the country of Columbia up the east coast for about half the cost of shipping it by rail from Kentucky. What’s more, they say it is easier to get out the ground and burns more efficiently. As if we didn’t have enough to worry about.

  • Letters to the Editor: Oct. 1, 2014

    Stop avoiding Fairness Ordinance issue

     

    Dear Sentinel-News,

     

    It is both surprising and disturbing that just before an election year, our Shelby County officials from Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty to the [Shelby County] Human Rights Commission – formed in 2009 in Shelby County – are avoiding and postponing action on the Fairness Ordinance which other communities have passed.

  • Letters to the Editor: Oct. 1, 2014

    Stop avoiding Fairness Ordinance issue

     

    Dear Sentinel-News,

     

    It is both surprising and disturbing that just before an election year, our Shelby County officials from Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty to the [Shelby County] Human Rights Commission – formed in 2009 in Shelby County – are avoiding and postponing action on the Fairness Ordinance which other communities have passed.

  • WHAT WE THINK: It’s time to take advantage of our empty lots downtown

    Last weekend the city of Louisville started its ReSurfaced event.

    Behind still-standing facades of three buildings on Louisville’s Main Street, a party pops up on Thursdays through Sundays through the last Sunday in October. There are food trucks, drink service, and live music and plenty of young adults and families enjoying the atmosphere.

    The annual fall event takes advantage of the cool temperatures, a vacant city lot and people’s penchant for eating, drinking and congregating in an outdoor setting. Call it tailgating without the football game.

  • WHAT WE THINK: It’s time to take advantage of our empty lots downtown

    Last weekend the city of Louisville started its ReSurfaced event.

    Behind still-standing facades of three buildings on Louisville’s Main Street, a party pops up on Thursdays through Sundays through the last Sunday in October. There are food trucks, drink service, and live music and plenty of young adults and families enjoying the atmosphere.

    The annual fall event takes advantage of the cool temperatures, a vacant city lot and people’s penchant for eating, drinking and congregating in an outdoor setting. Call it tailgating without the football game.