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Today's Opinions

  • WHAT WE THINK: A total eclipse of our day

    Well that was fun!

    The build up was immense, the hype beyond anything even the sporting world could produce.

    But the solar eclipse lived up to its billing as one of the greatest celestial shows on earth.

    Maybe Shelby County wasn’t in the path of totality and maybe it’s didn’t get dark enough to fool our bats into coming out and our chickens into going in to roost.

    It turns out about 5 percent of the sun is still a lot of light.

  • WHAT WE THINK: A total eclipse of our day

    Well that was fun!

    The build up was immense, the hype beyond anything even the sporting world could produce.

    But the solar eclipse lived up to its billing as one of the greatest celestial shows on earth.

    Maybe Shelby County wasn’t in the path of totality and maybe it’s didn’t get dark enough to fool our bats into coming out and our chickens into going in to roost.

    It turns out about 5 percent of the sun is still a lot of light.

  • Letters to the Editor: Aug. 23, 2017

    Successful summer reading program

     

    Letter to the Editor

    I would like to thank all of the Shelby County children and youth, along with their parents, grandparents and caregivers, who participated in our “Build a Better World” summer reading program for 2017. We had more than 1,300 children and youth sign up for the summer reading program, with almost 800 completing the program. Well done!

  • Letters to the Editor: Aug. 23, 2017

    Successful summer reading program

     

    Letter to the Editor

    I would like to thank all of the Shelby County children and youth, along with their parents, grandparents and caregivers, who participated in our “Build a Better World” summer reading program for 2017. We had more than 1,300 children and youth sign up for the summer reading program, with almost 800 completing the program. Well done!

  • GUEST EDITORIAL, Matthew Paxton IV: Slow mail costs money

    Most people get mail every day, Monday through Saturday. But what happens when the mail comes later than we expect?

    We found out a few years ago, when the Postmaster General had to take away overnight First-Class and Periodicals mail from most of the nation. That caused a problem for a lot of consumers and businesses. Now we may be facing a new slowdown, if Congress doesn’t do something very soon.

    Who needs the mail, some people ask? We have the Internet now.

  • GUEST EDITORIAL, Matthew Paxton IV: Slow mail costs money

    Most people get mail every day, Monday through Saturday. But what happens when the mail comes later than we expect?

    We found out a few years ago, when the Postmaster General had to take away overnight First-Class and Periodicals mail from most of the nation. That caused a problem for a lot of consumers and businesses. Now we may be facing a new slowdown, if Congress doesn’t do something very soon.

    Who needs the mail, some people ask? We have the Internet now.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Water tower removal is a sign of growth

    Facebook has been flooded recently with people taking photos of and waxing poetic about the old water tower in downtown Shelbyville.

    As crews started working on taking it down over the weekend – and work will continue this weekend – we heard more and more people lament its removal.

    We, too, were sad to see it go, but changes are necessary.

    Water company manager Tom Doyle said last week that it would cost more than $300,000 just to bring it up to current safety standards.

  • WHAT WE THINK: Water tower removal is a sign of growth

    Facebook has been flooded recently with people taking photos of and waxing poetic about the old water tower in downtown Shelbyville.

    As crews started working on taking it down over the weekend – and work will continue this weekend – we heard more and more people lament its removal.

    We, too, were sad to see it go, but changes are necessary.

    Water company manager Tom Doyle said last week that it would cost more than $300,000 just to bring it up to current safety standards.