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My Word

  • MY WORD: ‘Miss Bug’ spotlights a final student

    When I visited the Education Center @ Cropper on May 2, I chatted with a junior, Jose Menendez, about the online algebra course he was taking. He switched gears and reminded me that we first met when he was a student at Painted Stone Elementary. He vividly remembered the history lesson I shared about the Painted Stone settlement and even the rock painted red that I brought with me.

    “You’re ‘Miss Bug,’ right?” he asked.

    He was right.

  • MY WORD: The real challenge to education

    In response to my article titled (“Is public education at a crossroad?” My Word, April 10), Rev. Jerry Stephenson suggested that I had “left out some important points as it relates to charter schools and the value they could bring to Kentucky” (“In support charter schools,” My Word, April 17).

  • MY WORD: A take on outlet mall construction

    Jamie Jarboe of Simpsonville created this drawing to show her feelings about the ecological issues around construction of the outlet mall at Simpsonville.

  • MY WORD: What Jason Collins did was not heroic

    NBA player Jason Collins made headlines and history last week when he became the first active male player from one of the big four team sports to openly announce he was gay. Of all the adjectives used to describe the announcement,  “courageous’ seems to be the most oft-repeated. I disagree for two reasons.

  • MY WORD: How to help feed the birds

    I suggest each of you save money, save your valuable time and save birds – even if not all of you would like to do. I hope to suggest to you as to how this can be accomplished in such a way that also hopefully will make you proud.

  • MY WORD:Walking route to visit Oprah passes through Shelby County

    In autumn of 2009, I left my hometown of Hazard on a 500-mile walk to Oprah Winfrey’s studio in Chicago, Illinois, only 18 months after I finished extensive chemotherapy. The walk served two purposes: raising money for the American Cancer Society and hand delivering my writings to Oprah. I’ve dreamed of being an author since I was 6 years old. Operation Oprah led me up and down the Appalachian Mountains, through the entire state of Indiana and finally into the windy city. Along the way, I walked through your beautiful town of Shelbyville.

  • MY WORD: Explaining votes on gun measures

    Every time I listen to the parents of the children who were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary, I am profoundly sad. I have three boys, and the grief and pain that a parent feels when their child is taken is hard to fathom. I can only imagine the magnitude of their grief.

  • MY WORD: In support of charter schools

    An article published in The Sentinel News (“Public education at a crossroad? Charter schools aren't answer,” My Word, April 10), written by J. Howard Griffith, raised some interesting questions about charter schools and what they could mean for the state of Kentucky, which, as the author notes, is one of only seven states that do not allow the formation of such educational options.

  • MY WORD: A story of life after death

    Eight years ago, Jessica Stivers had a dream, she said, that included a former classmate, Tylan Smither. “We met when we were four years old and attended the old Cropper Elementary,” she said.

    They had similar friends at Shelby County High School but never dated, even lost track of each other – until eight years ago, when she had the dream, mentioned it to her mother and then ran into Smither and his mother at Cracker Barrel.

  • MY WORD: Public education at a crossroad? Charter schools aren't answer

    My grandfather was a farmer and teamster in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in West Virginia. Back in 1915 he was asked to move a rural school building from one location to another, about 100 yards.

    He raised up that little one room schoolhouse by about 2 feet and placed several round logs under the building as rollers. He then hooked his fine team of horses to a harness attached to the building and slowly but surely moved the building to its new location.