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My Word

  • MY WORD: The legacy of our children

    Ten years after I graduated from college, I felt like I had a dual life. On one hand, I was a husband and new father. On the other hand, I was a salesman with a $14 million, 5-state territory.

    The two parts of my life battled each other. I performed the job from my car and was the classic "road warrior." It was not uncommon for me to leave on a Monday morning and spend the majority of the week calling the other portion of my life from a hotel telephone.

  • MY WORD: How I made it to 102

    Hard work won't kill you, for I did my share of that. Born on July 24, 1911. as the only girl in the family of Thomas D. and Minnie K Lewis, I had three older brothers to put up with. This meant I had to clean up after them, help cook their meals and wash their dishes.

  • MY WORD: Saying thanks to a pair of extraordinary music teachers who helped us grow

    NOTE: Chris Hauck, a former resident of Shelby County, was one of the participants in the memorial jam concert on Saturday to honor late former music teachers Ernie Threlkeld, Susie Saunders and Mel Owen. He wrote this on the Facebook after Threlkeld’s passing last fall. Hauck shared it for publication.

     

  • MY WORD: Why the planet doesn’t need to be saved

    I have for many years enjoyed Horace Brown’s weekly articles on birds. It brings me no pleasure to correct what are significant factual errors in his article by such a passionate proponent of exploring the world of nature. I don’t suppose for a moment that I will be able to change his mind, but refuse to let unreferenced misstatements stand unrefuted (“The Evidence for Global Warming,” March 6).

  • MY WORD: Here's the whole story on Shelby garbage plan action

    It became apparent to me after reading Lisa King’s article published in The Sentinel-News  (“County trashing pickup plan?” April 19) that she and I were not at the same meeting.  I attended and spoke at the meeting and feel I need to clarify several discrepancies Ms. King reported in her article about the unpopular, proposed, mandatory or government franchised countywide garbage/recycling pickup the county wants to force upon its citizens.

  • MY WORD: Making sense of unemployment

    In the April edition of Readers Digest there is an article by David Brooks, an op-ed columnist for the New York Times entitled “The Stem and the Flower.”

  • MY WORD: Concerned for animal rights

    I would like to thank Linda Ethington for her compassionate letter (Animal Rights, Page A4, July 16) concerning the plight of chained dogs, and to let her know that there are people fighting for this cause.

    On July 28th from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Dogs Deserve Better (DDB) founder Tamira Thayne chained herself to a doghouse on the Capitol steps in Frankfort to bring attention to the plight of chained and penned dogs. Representatives from Speak Out and Rescue (SOAR) and the Franklin County Humane Society joined her.

  • MY WORD: Confused by confusion at JHS

    A recent encounter with some local medical professionals has left me wondering how, and why, there is a facility in Shelbyville known as a “hospital.”  After dealing with my father’s passing in January 2014, my mother had two questionable mammograms this spring, which lead her doctor to prescribe a needle biopsy, or a stereotactic biopsy.  The procedure was scheduled for June 23, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. at Shelbyville’s Jewish Hospital.

  • MY WORD: How to disprove your own argument
  • MY WORD: Requiem for a tree

    When I was a little boy, my favorite book was The Giving Tree, by Shel Silverstein. Perhaps like most children, I was always saddened by the slow disappearance of the tree into the insatiable worldly desires of the young boy. The apples and branches and trunk all find their way into the black hole of the boy’s ambition.

    “I want money, a house, a boat.” Take from my body, the tree says. I am told that the story is a parable for the selfless giving of a parent, a friend, a Christ, a God who is willing to sacrifice in the name of love and affection.