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My Word

  • MY WORD: Pleasureville's no decision is an unfair decision

    Oh, Pleasureville.

    I can’t say after Monday night’s meeting that I’m surprised, really. Disappointed, but not surprised. And that, in itself, is a fairly sad commentary on what happened.

    You see, you had a chance to do something good. You had a chance to do something that really matters. You had a chance to lead the way in Henry County – and a corner of Shelby County.

    But you sat on your hands, looking quietly and somewhat awkwardly at the table while the motion to approve a Fairness Ordinance died for lack of a second.

  • MY WORD: Leadership Shelby has a new appreciation of farming

    It is easy in today’s busy world to overlook and even under-appreciate the role agriculture plays in our communities, and the Leadership Shelby Class of 2014 embarked last month on its first field session affectionately known as Ag Day.

  • MY WORD: Lessons we need to learn anew

    Opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of this publication or any organization to which I have belonged. I hold a degree in economics from Duke. I do not profess to be an expert. An economist, to me, is someone who spends years, maybe a lifetime, studying some arcane numbers and comes up with a theory no one else understands.

  • MY WORD: Remembering Doolittle's raid on Tokyo

    I am one of a number of active members in the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1179 and in Governor Isaac Shelby Sons of the American Revolution in Shelbyville.

    Two fellow World War II veterans are Ed Myles and Roy Hardesty. Ed flew on a B24 on bombing missions over Germany, and Roy flew on a B25 making bombing flights on Japanese positions in China. Both were gunners on their planes.

  • MY WORD: Problems with Affordable Care Act

    In answer to Linda Humphress’ question regarding why Sen. Mitch McConnell would be opposed to the Affordable Care Act (“Health care reform, Letters to the editor, Sept. 25):

    He is well aware of the harmful effects of the act and wishes to protect his constituents. We all know our health care as it stands now needs some improvements. The ACA misses the mark by a wide margin, and Senator McConnell expressed that opinion.

  • MY WORD: Help needed for preservation of pioneer graves

    Shelby County has the honor of being the final resting place of two of Kentucky’s foremost pioneer frontiersmen, Gen. Benjamin Logan and Col. James Knox. They both lie in peaceful repose in the Logan family cemetery on a bluff overlooking Bullskin Creek on what was the Benjamin Logan farm. They played key roles in history, and our county needs your help to preserve their heritage.

  • MY WORD: Health department leader explains role

    After reviewing the articles regarding North Central District Health Department and the Shelby County Board of Health (“Spending Your Tax Dollars: 2 agencies, 1 leader,” Sept. 27), I find it necessary to address several issues raised.

  • MY WORD: Hard work, great progress

    As chairman of the Shelby County Board of Education, I have an interesting and unique view of the Shelby County Public School (SCPS) system. It is an eye-opening experience.

    I am amazed at the dedication and commitment that the school’s administration and employees show for our students. Through the first full year of Unbridled Learning, the state’s accountability model, they simply got down to business and went about the tireless work of improving.

  • MY WORD: Marching to realize the dream

    Why was I marching on Aug. 24, in Washington, D.C.? The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom took place in 1963, five years before I was born. I grew up in a very small racist town Shelbyville, so I take civil rights to heart.

    Being an African-American female, the 1963 civil rights March on Washington, DC left a bittersweet feeling. We still have to realize the dream. Some of the same issues and racism civil rights leaders marched for in 1963 still exist today.

  • MY WORD: Tour tells tales of the dead

    The local newspaper has published wedding announcements longer than all of us have been alive. In my days with the newspaper from 1971-1998, I can remember publishing details about the bride’s gown and flowers, the musical selections, and even a list of all the parties or showers that were held in honor of the happy couple.

    However, an announcement from 1867 would have raised a few eyebrows: “...The bride, who our readers all know, is not mere ‘skin and bones’…”

    Who was the bride? Who wrote the article?